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Book
xvi, 210 pages ; 23 cm.
The one percent has been providing an ever larger share of campaign funds since the 1980s. Well over half of the money contributed to the presidential race in 2015 came from only about 350 families. One-fourth of it came from just seventy-eight donors, all of whom made contributions of $1 million or more. Can we still say we live in a democracy if a few hundred rich families provide such disproportionate shares of campaign funds? Congress and the courts are divided on that question, with conservatives saying yes and liberals saying no. The debate is about the most fundamental of political questions: how we define democracy, and how we want our democracy to work. The debate may ultimately be about political theory, but in practice it is conducted in terms of laws, regulations, and court decisions about PACs, super PACs, 527s, 501(c)(4)s, dark money, the Federal Election Commission, and even the IRS. This book explains how those laws, regulations, and court decisions fit into the larger debate about how we want our democracy to work.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190274696 20161024
Green Library
Book
xi, 306 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Parties, incumbents, and campaign finance in American politics
  • Majority status and institutional power
  • The growth of member giving
  • Brother, can you spare a thousand? who gives to whom?
  • Getting ahead by giving a lot: party goals and advancement in the House
  • Leveraging funds to pay for the new party fundraising expectations
  • Redistribution and the value of a house career
  • Beyond legislating.
With the need for ever increasing sums of money to fuel the ongoing campaign for majority control, both Republicans and Democrats have made large donations to the party and its candidates mandatory for members seeking advancement within party and congressional committee hierarchies. Eric S. Heberlig and Bruce A. Larson analyze this development and discuss its implications for American government and democracy. They address the consequences of selecting congressional leaders on the basis of their fundraising skills rather than their legislative capacity and the extent to which the battle for majority control leads Congress to prioritize short-term electoral gains over long-term governing and problem-solving.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780472118137 20160608
Green Library

3. Election spending [2012]

Book
225 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xi, 157 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Why do some 30 million people in the United States give money to political candidates and causes-even though most individual contributions are irrational from the perspective of a strict cost-benefit analysis? How do campaign fundraisers tap into potential donors' motivations? Exploring three decades of historical data and also drawing extensively on the insights of contemporary campaign directors and consultants, Bertram Johnson makes sense of why people give and considers what this means for the campaign finance system, and the quality of representation, in the United States.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781935049555 20180709
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (157 pages) : illustrations, charts, tables
Why do some 30 million people in the United States give money to political candidates and causes-even though most individual contributions are irrational from the perspective of a strict cost-benefit analysis? How do campaign fundraisers tap into potential donors' motivations? Exploring three decades of historical data and also drawing extensively on the insights of contemporary campaign directors and consultants, Bertram Johnson makes sense of why people give and considers what this means for the campaign finance system, and the quality of representation, in the United States.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781935049555 20180709

7. Committee treasurers [1996 - ]

Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 23 x 10 cm.
Journal/Periodical
v.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 315 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction : a contractual perspective on interest group politics
  • The political utility of advisory committees
  • The institutional underpinnings of political contracts
  • A theory of political contracts
  • Defusing contractual hazards
  • Interest group demand and the spread of advisory committees
  • Advisory committees as instruments of bureaucratic influence
  • The efficiency of contracts in governing political exchange
  • Conclusions.
Green Library
Book
viii, 188 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Pay-to-Play Politics examines money and politics from different angles to understand a central paradox of American democracy: why, when the public and politicians decry money as the worst aspect of American politics, are there so few signs of change? * Presents a holistic academic treatment of the topic of money and politics in America that is also accessible to general readers * Includes a broad range of policy recommendations pertaining to lobbying, campaign finance, and wealth * Synthesizes the complex research on the relationship between money and politics, offering readers a clear explanation of what to worry about and what is not a cause for concern * Offers an expert assessment of all the major political reforms to promote democratic government and reduce the negative consequences of money and politics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781440850059 20160704
Green Library
Book
x, 241 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Campaign financing is one of today's most divisive political issues. The left asserts that the electoral process is rife with corruption. The right protests that the real aim of campaign limits is to suppress political activity and protect incumbents. Meanwhile, money flows freely on both sides. In Plutocrats United, Richard Hasen argues that both left and right avoid the key issue of the new Citizens United era: balancing political inequality with free speech. The Supreme Court has long held that corruption and its appearance are the only reasons to constitutionally restrict campaign funds. Progressives often agree but have a much broader view of corruption. Hasen argues for a new focus and way forward: if the government is to ensure robust political debate, the Supreme Court should allow limits on money in politics to prevent those with great economic power from distorting the political process.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300212457 20160619
Green Library
Video
1 online resource (15 min.)
May 9, 2014 - What's widely known in Washington may come as a surprise to the public: members of Congress can and often do use funds donated to their political action committee for personal use like private trips and hiring family members. Steve Kroft reports.
Book
xii, 363 pages, 12 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Introduction -- Chapter One From Plutocrats to Populists: 1884-1900 -- Chapter Two The 1904 Election and the First Scandals: 1904-1907 -- Chapter Three The Beginning of Reform: 1905-1907 -- Chapter Four The Triumph of Reform: 1908-1911 -- Chapter Five Big Business Money Remains Dominant: 1912-1928 -- Chapter Six Organized Labor Becomes Active: 1932-1948 -- Chapter Seven The Revival of Reform: 1952-1972 -- Chapter Eight From Buckley to Austin: 1976-1990 -- Chapter Nine From Reform to Reaction: 1996-Present -- Conclusion -- Appendix Contributors to Theodore Roosevelt's 1904 Campaign -- References -- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199340002 20160616
Campaign finance reform has always been motivated by a definition of democracy that does not count corporations as citizens and holds that self-government works best by reducing political inequality. In the early years of the twentieth century, Congress recognized the strength of these principles by prohibiting corporations from making campaign contributions, passing a disclosure law, and setting limits on campaign expenditures. These reforms were not controversial at the time, but conservative opposition to them appeared in the 1970s. That opposition was well represented in the Supreme Court, which has rolled back reform by granting First Amendment rights to corporations and declaring the goal of reducing political inequality to be unconstitutional. Buying the Vote analyzes the rise and decline of campaign finance reform by tracking changes in the way presidential campaigns have been funded since the late nineteenth century, and changes in the debate over how to reform fundraising practices. A close examination of major Supreme Court decisions shows how the Court has fashioned a new and profoundly inegalitarian redefinition of American democracy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199340002 20160616
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (306 pages) : illustrations, graphs, tables
The amount of money flowing through U.S. politics continues to astound. "While not all expenditures are reported, " writes David Magleby, "our best estimate is that at least $8 billion was spent in the 2012 federal elections." In this essential volume, the latest in a quadrennial series dating back to 1960, Magleby and his colleagues reveal where all this the money came from, where it went, what were the results - and why it matters.Anthony Corrado examines the most important changes and legal challenges to the law and regulation of campaign finance leading up to the 2012 election. John Green, Michael Koehler, and Ian Schwarber discuss the dynamics and funding of the Republicans' presidential nomination contest as well as the Obama campaign's activity - including the role his Priorities USA "Super PAC" played in negatively defining Romney.Candice Nelson examines in considerable detail how each side raised and spent its funds and the implications of their different approaches. Paul Herrnson, Kelly Patterson, and Stephanie Perry Curtis explore the financing of congressional elections. Diana Dwyre and Robin Kolodny examine the ways political parties raised and spent money through their national committees, including congressional campaign committees.Jay Goodliffe and Magleby examine how interest groups raised and spent money - closely examining the effect of the new Super PACs. How did these organizations raise more than $828 million, and how did they allot the $609 million they reported spending, and to what effect? Thomas Mann concludes with a summary of lessons recently learned regarding the financing of federal elections. What changes should be made to the system, and what institutional steps would they require?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815725633 20180530
Book
xviii, 339 pages ; 25 cm
  • Introduction: Privilege resurgent
  • This is not what democracy looks like
  • The $10 billion election : what it looks like when billionaires start spending
  • The architects of dollarocracy : Lewis Powell, John Roberts, and the robber baron court
  • The bull market : political advertising
  • Media corporations : where the bucks stop
  • The rise and fall of professional journalism
  • Journalism exits, stage right
  • Digital politics : there is no such thing as "too much information"
  • The right to vote : beginning the new age of reform.
Fresh from the first $10 billion election campaign, two award-winning authors show how unbridled campaign spending defines our politics and, failing a dramatic intervention, signals the end of our democracy. Blending vivid reporting from the 2012 campaign trail and deep perspective from decades covering American and international media and politics, political journalist John Nichols and media critic Robert W. McChesney explain how US elections are becoming controlled, predictable enterprises that are managed by a new class of consultants who wield millions of dollars and define our politics as never before. As the money gets bigger--especially after the Citizens United ruling--and journalism, a core check and balance on the government, declines, American citizens are in danger of becoming less informed and more open to manipulation. With groundbreaking behind-the-scenes reporting and staggering new research on "the money power, " Dollarocracy shows that this new power does not just endanger electoral politics; it is a challenge to the DNA of American democracy itself.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781568587073 20160611
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xviii, 339 pages ; 25 cm
  • Privilege resurgent
  • This is not what democracy looks like
  • The $10 billion election: what it looks like when billionaires start spending
  • The architects of dollarocracy: Lewis Powell, John Roberts, and the robber baron court
  • The bull market: political advertising
  • Media corporations: where the bucks stop
  • The rise and fall of professional journalism
  • Journalism exits, stage right
  • Digital politics: there is no such thing as "too much information"
  • The right to vote: beginning the new age of reform.
Fresh from the first $10 billion election campaign, two award-winning authors show how unbridled campaign spending defines our politics and, failing a dramatic intervention, signals the end of our democracy. Blending vivid reporting from the 2012 campaign trail and deep perspective from decades covering American and international media and politics, political journalist John Nichols and media critic Robert W. McChesney explain how US elections are becoming controlled, predictable enterprises that are managed by a new class of consultants who wield millions of dollars and define our politics as never before. As the money gets bigger--especially after the Citizens United ruling--and journalism, a core check and balance on the government, declines, American citizens are in danger of becoming less informed and more open to manipulation. With groundbreaking behind-the-scenes reporting and staggering new research on "the money power, " Dollarocracy shows that this new power does not just endanger electoral politics; it is a challenge to the DNA of American democracy itself.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781568587073 20160611
Green Library
Book
xv, 254 p. : ill ; 23 cm.
  • Measuring the influence of campaign contributions in the legislative process
  • Patterns of state legislative campaign finance
  • An investment model of campaign contributions
  • The time legislators devote to fundraising
  • How much is a legislator's time worth to a contributor?
  • The influence of campaign contributions in legislative chambers
  • Fundraising for the caucus: expectations and practices
  • Fundraising and lobbying.
Campaign contributions are widely viewed as a corrupting influence but most scholarly research concludes that they have marginal impact on legislative behavior. Lynda W. Powell shows that contributions have considerable influence in some state legislatures but very little in others. Using a national survey of legislators, she develops an innovative measure of influence and delineates the factors that explain this great variation across the 99 U.S. state legislative chambers.Powell identifies the personal, institutional, and political factors that determine how much time a legislator devotes to personal fundraising and fundraising for the caucus. She shows that the extent of donors' legislative influence varies in ways corresponding to the same variations in the factors that determine fundraising time. She also confirms a link between fundraising and lobbying with evidence supporting the theory that contributors gain access to legislators based on donations, Powell's findings have important implications for the debate over the role of money in the legislative process.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780472071722 20160614
Green Library
Database topics
American History; Economics and Business; Political Science
Source of comprehensive, timely and objective campaign finance and lobbying information available. With campaign donation and expenditure data dating to the 1979-80 election cycle.
Journal/Periodical
1 online resource

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