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Book
655 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Introduction - a tour of multiple view geometry-- Part 0. The Background: Projective Geometry, Transformations and Estimation: 2. Projective geometry and transformations of 2D-- 3. Projective geometry and transformations of 3D-- 4. Estimation - 2D projective transforms-- 5. Algorithm evaluation and error analysis-- Part I. Camera Geometry and Single View Geometry: 6. Camera models-- 7. Computation of the camera matrix-- 8. More single view geometry-- Part II. Two-View Geometry: 9. Epipolar geometry and the fundamental matrix-- 10. 3D reconstruction of cameras and structure-- 11. Computation of the fundamental matrix F-- 12. Structure computation-- 13. Scene planes and homographies-- 14. Affine epipolar geometry-- Part III. Three-View Geometry: 15. The trifocal tensor-- 16. Computation of the trifocal tensor T-- Part IV. N -View Geometry: 17. N-linearities and multiple view tensors-- 18. N-view computational methods-- 19. Auto-calibration-- 20. Duality-- 21. Chirality-- 22. Degenerate configurations-- Part V. Appendices: Appendix 1. Tensor notation-- Appendix 2. Gaussian (normal) and chi-squared distributions-- Appendix 3. Parameter estimation. Appendix 4. Matrix properties and decompositions-- Appendix 5. Least-squares minimization-- Appendix 6. Iterative Estimation Methods-- Appendix 7. Some special plane projective transformations-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521540513 20160528
A basic problem in computer vision is to understand the structure of a real world scene given several images of it. Techniques for solving this problem are taken from projective geometry and photogrammetry. Here, the authors cover the geometric principles and their algebraic representation in terms of camera projection matrices, the fundamental matrix and the trifocal tensor. The theory and methods of computation of these entities are discussed with real examples, as is their use in the reconstruction of scenes from multiple images. The new edition features an extended introduction covering the key ideas in the book (which itself has been updated with additional examples and appendices) and significant new results which have appeared since the first edition. Comprehensive background material is provided, so readers familiar with linear algebra and basic numerical methods can understand the projective geometry and estimation algorithms presented, and implement the algorithms directly from the book.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521540513 20160528
Engineering Library (Terman)
Book
xvi, 607 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • Introduction-- Part I. The Background: Projective Geometry, Transformations and Estimation: 1. Outline of Part I-- 2. Projective geometry and transformations of 2D-- 3. Projective geometry and transformations of 3D-- 4. Estimation - 2D projective transforms-- Part II. Camera Geometry and Single View Geometry: 6. Outline of Part II-- 6. Camera models-- 7. Camera calibration-- 8. More single view geometry-- Part III. Two View Geometry: 9. Outline of Part III-- 10. Epipolar geometry and the fundamental matrix-- 11. 3D reconstruction and structure computations-- 12. Computation of F-- 13. Structure computation-- 14. The case of planes-- 15. Affine epipolar geometry-- Part IV. Three View Geometry: 16. Outline of Part IV-- 17. The trifocal tensor-- 18. Computation of T-- Part V. N View Geometry: 19. Outline of Part V-- 20. N-linearities-- 21. Computation of the quadrifocal tensor-- 22. N-view computational methods-- 23. Chirality-- 24. Degenerate configurations-- 25. Auto-calibration-- 26. Image rectification-- Appendix 1. Useful formulas-- Appendix 2. Tensor notation-- Appendix 3. Gaussian (normal) and chi-squared distributions-- Appendix 4. Numerical algorithms-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521623049 20160528
A basic problem in computer vision is to understand the structure of a real world scene given several images of it. Techniques used in the book for solving this are taken from projective geometry and photogrammetry. The authors cover the geometric principles and their algebraic representation in terms of camera projection matrices, the fundamental matrix and the trifocal tensor. The theory and methods of computation of these entities are discussed with real examples, as is their use in the reconstruction of scenes from multiple images. Recent major developments in the theory and practice of scene reconstruction are described in detail in a unified framework. The authors provide comprehensive background material, so a reader familiar with linear algebra and basic numerical methods will be able to understand the projective geometry and estimation algorithms presented, and implement the algorithms directly from the book.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521623049 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
225 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 655 p. : ill. (some col.)
Book
xvi, 655 p. : ill. (some col.)
Book
xiii, 540 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Part 1 Foundations: algebraic invariants - invariant theory and enumerative combinatorics of young tableaux, Shreeram S. Abhyankar, geometric interpretation of joint conic invariants, Joseph L. Mundy, et al, an experimental evaluation of projective invariants, Christopher Coelho, et al-- the projection of two non-coplanar conics, Stephen J. Maybank-- the non-existence of general-case view-invariants, J. Brian Burns, et al-- invariants of non-algebraic curves - noise resistant invariants of curves, Isaac Weiss, semi-differential invariants, Luc J. Van Gool, et al, projective invariants for curves in two and three dimensions, Michael H. Brill, et al, numerical evaluation of differential and semi-differential invariants, Christopher Brown, recognizing general curved objects efficiently, Andrew Zisserman, et al-- fitting affine invariant conics to curves, Deepak Kapur and Joseph L. Mundy, projectively invariant decomposition of planar shapes, Stefan Carlsson-- invariants from multiple views - invariant linear methods in photogrammetry and model-matching, Eamon B. Barrett, et al-- semi-differential invariants for nonplanar curves, Luc J. Van Gool, et al-- disambiguating stereo matches with spatio-temporal surfaces, Olivier Faugeras and Theo Papadopoulo. Part 2 Applications: transformation invariant indexing, Haim J. Wolfson and Yehezkel Lamdan-- affine invariants for model-based recognition, John E. Hopcroft, et al-- object recognition based on moment (or algebraic) invariants, Gabriel Taubin and David B. Cooper-- fast recognition using algebraic invariants, Charles A. Rothwell, et al-- toward 3D curved object recognition from image contours, Jean Ponce and David J. Kriegman-- relative positioning with uncalibrated cameras, Roger Mohr, et al. Appendix: projective geometry for machine vision, Joseph L. Mundy and Andrew Zisserman.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262132855 20160528
These 23 contributions focus on developments in the field of geometric invariants and their application to computer vision. The introduction summarizes the basics of invariant theory, discusses how invariants are related to problems in computer vision, and looks at the future possibilities, particularly the notion that invariant analysis might provide a solution to the elusive problem of recognizing general curved 3D objects from an arbitrary viewpoint. The remaining chapters consist of original papers that present important developments as well as tutorial articles that provide useful background material. These chapters are grouped into categories covering algebraic invariants, nonalgebraic invariants, invariants of multiple views, and applications. An appendix provides an extensive introduction to projective geometry and its applications to basic problems in computer vision.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262132855 20160528
Engineering Library (Terman)
Book
4 v. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
The four-volume set comprising "LNCS" volumes 5302/5303/5304/5305 constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 10th European Conference on Computer Vision, ECCV 2008, held in Marseille, France, in October 2008. The 243 revised papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from a total of 871 papers submitted. The four books cover the entire range of current issues in computer vision. The papers are organized in topical sections on recognition, stereo, people and face recognition, object tracking, matching, learning and features, MRFs, segmentation, computational photography and active reconstruction.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783540886921 20160527
Book
401 p.
This book constitutes the strictly refereed post-workshop proceedings of the second International Workshop on Object Representation in Computer Vision, held in conjunction with ECCV '96 in Cambridge, UK, in April 1996.The 15 revised full papers contained in the book were selected from 45 submissions for presentation at the workshop. Also included are three invited contributions based on the talks by Takeo Kanade, Jan Koenderink, and Ram Nevatia as well as a workshop report by the volume editors summarizing several panel discussions and the general state of the art in the area.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783540617501 20160528
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 382 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-workshop proceedings of the International Workshop on Vision Algorithms held in Corfu, Greece in September 1999 in conjunction with ICCV'99. The 15 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 65 submissions; each paper is complemented by a brief transcription of the discussion that followed its presentation. Also included are two invited contributions and two expert reviews as well as a panel discussion. The volume spans the whole range of algorithms for geometric vision. The authors and volume editors succeeded in providing added value beyond a mere collection of papers and made the volume a state-of-the-art survey of their field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783540679738 20160527
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 241 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
link.springer-ny.com requires Adobe Acrobat software to view PDF files
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 510 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
This book is the proceedings of the Second Joint European-US Workshop on Applications of Invariance to Computer Vision, held at Ponta Delgada, Azores, Portugal in October 1993. The book contains 25 carefully refereed papers by distinguished researchers. The papers cover all relevant foundational aspects of geometric and algebraic invariance as well as applications to computer vision, particularly to recovery and reconstruction, object recognition, scene analysis, robotic navigation, and statistical analysis. In total, the collection of papers, together with an introductory survey by the editors, impressively documents that geometry, in its different variants, is the most successful and ubiquitous tool in computer vision.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783540582403 20160528
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

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