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Book
xxvii, 996 pages ; 27 cm
  • Preface
  • Overview of Fourth Amendment structure
  • Historical overview of search and seizure practices
  • The right to be "secure"
  • Objects protected by the Amendment : people, persons, houses, papers, and effects
  • "Seizure" : when does a seizure occur?
  • Arrests, stops, and other seizures of persons
  • Defining "search"
  • Search incident to arrest
  • Protective weapon searches [frisks] and sweeps
  • Other categories of searches
  • The reasonableness of a search or seizure
  • Warrant issuance, review, and execution
  • The exclusionary rule and other remedies.
"[This book] treats Supreme Court case law and offers a structured, analytical approach to the Fourth Amendment, addressing foundational questions: What is a search? What is a seizure? What does the Amendment protect? When is it satisfied? When does the exclusionary rule apply? The treatise offers ready access to current doctrine. The historical events and the development of search and seizure principles over time provide perspective. Fourth Amendment jurisprudence is in constant change and this third edition incorporates all Supreme Court developments since the second edition and many important lower court cases. The third edition...expands treatment of digital evidence in Chapter 1, highlighting the increasing importance of such evidence, and has additional treatment of digital evidence throughout. Although the structure of previous editions has been retained, every section of the new edition has new material and many sections have been substantially revised to address new developments. It is apparent to any student of our Constitution that the Fourth Amendment is the fundamental right that makes all the others viable by restraining governmental actions in so many aspects of life."-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
pages cm
  • Approaching the Fourth Amendment
  • Historical overview of search and seizure practices
  • The right to be "secure"
  • Objects protected by the amendment: people, persons, houses, papers, and effects
  • "Seizure": when does a seizure occur?
  • Arrests, stops, other seizures of persons
  • Defining "search"
  • Search incident to arrest
  • Protective weapon searches [frisks] and sweeps
  • Other categories of searches
  • The reasonableness of a search or seizure
  • Warrant issuance, review, and warrant execution issues
  • The exclusionary rule and other remedies.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 145 p.
  • Protecting the U.S. perimeter : border searches under the Fourth Amendment / Yule Kim
  • Border searches of laptop computers and other electronic storage devices / Yule Kim
  • Government access to phone calling activity and related records : legal authorities / Elizabeth B. Bazan, Edward C. Liu, Gina Stevens
  • Herring v. United States : extension of the good-faith exception to the exclusionary rule in Fourth Amendment cases / Anna C. Henning
  • Fourth Amendment protections against student strip searches : Safford Unified School District #1 v. Redding / David H. Carpenter
  • Governmental drug testing programs : legal and constitutional developments / David H. Carpenter
  • Compulsory DNA collection : a Fourth Amendment analysis / Anna C. Henning.
Book
ix, 321 p. ; 24 cm.
  • The history of the Fourth Amendment
  • The cardinal principle of search and seizure
  • Exceptions to the cardinal principle
  • Reasonableness and the Fourth Amendment
  • The exclusionary rule of justice
  • Limiting the definition of a search
  • The future of the Fourth Amendment.
This book explains the different approaches to interpreting the Fourth Amendment that the Supreme Court has used throughout American history, concentrating on the changes in interpretation since the Court applied the exclusionary rule to the states in 1961. It examines the evolution of the warrant rule and the exceptions to it, the reasonableness approach, the special needs approach, individual and society expectations of privacy, and the role of the exclusionary rule.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739129784 20160527
Green Library
Book
ix, 321 p. ; 24 cm.
  • The history of the Fourth Amendment
  • The cardinal principle of search and seizure
  • Exceptions to the cardinal principle
  • Reasonableness and the Fourth Amendment
  • The exclusionary rule of justice
  • Limiting the definition of a search
  • The future of the Fourth Amendment.
This book explains the different approaches to interpreting the Fourth Amendment that the Supreme Court has used throughout American history, concentrating on the changes in interpretation since the Court applied the exclusionary rule to the states in 1961. It examines the evolution of the warrant rule and the exceptions to it, the reasonableness approach, the special needs approach, individual and society expectations of privacy, and the role of the exclusionary rule.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739129784 20160527
Law Library (Crown)
Book
218 p. ; 26 cm.
  • Foreword / Thomas K. Clancy
  • "A long step down the totalitarian path" : Justice Douglas's great dissent in Terry v. Ohio / Paul Butler
  • Warrants for wearing a wire : Fourth Amendment privacy and Justice Harlan's dissent in United States v. White / Catherine Hancock
  • Knowing "consent" means "knowing consent" : the underappreciated wisdom of Justice Marshall's Schneckloth v. Bustamonte dissent / Arnold H. Loewy
  • Reasonableness as a rule : a paean to Justice O'Connor's dissent in Atwater v. City of Lago Vista / Wayne A. Logan
  • Brandeis in Olmstead : "our government is the potent, the omnipresent teacher" / Carol S. Steiker
  • Introduction to James Otis lectures / Thomas K. Clancy
  • The road to reason : Arizona v. Gant and the search incident to arrest doctrine / Myron Moskovitz.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxi, 716 p. ; 26 cm.
  • Approaching the Fourth Amendment
  • Historical overview of search and seizure practices
  • The right to be "secure"
  • Objects protected by the amendment : people, persons, houses, papers, and effects
  • "Seizure" : when does a seizure occur?
  • Arrests, stops, and other seizures of persons
  • Defining "search"
  • Search incident to arrest
  • Protective weapon searches (frisks) and sweeps
  • Other categories of searches
  • The reasonableness of a search or seizure
  • Warrant issuance, review, and execution
  • The exclusionary rule and other remedies.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 109 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
4 v. ; 26 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
3 v. ; 27 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 285 p.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
154 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
368 p. ; 22 cm.
  • What can history teach us about the meaning of the Fourth Amendment?
  • What constitutes a "search"?
  • What constitutes a "seizure"?
  • Terry stops and frisks
  • Racial profiling
  • The exclusionary rule
  • The Fourth Amendment and new technologies
  • The Fourth Amendment and the war on terror
  • New directions for the Fourth Amendment.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
465 pages ; 26 cm
  • Innocence, evidence, and the courts / Morgan Cloud
  • Deadly dilemmas II : bail and crime / Larry Laudan, Ronald J. Allen
  • The Roberts Court's failed innocence project / Janet C. Hoeffel
  • Taking reasonable doubt seriously / Arnold H. Loewy
  • White collar innocence : irrelevant in the high stakes risk game / Ellen S. Podgor
  • The role of innocence commissions : error discovery, systemic reform or both? / Kent Roach
  • Second thoughts on damages for wrongful convictions / Lawrence rosenthal
  • Intentional wrongful conviction of children / Victor Streib
  • Reliability, justice and confessions : th essential paradox
  • The irrelevancy of the Fourth Amendment in the Robert Court / Thomas K. Clancy
  • The Fourth Amendment, the exclusionary rule, and the Roberts Court : normative and empirical dimensions of the over-deterrence hypothesis / Donald Dripps
  • Replacing the exclusionary rule : Fourth Amendment violations as direct criminal contempt / Donald J. Rychlak
  • Mapp v. Ohio's unsung Hero : the suppression hearing as morality play / Scott E. Sundby
  • Fourth Amendment federalism and the silencing of the American poor / Andrew E. Taslitz
  • Melendez-Diaz and the right to confrontation / Craig M. Bradley
  • Stacking in criminal procedure adjudication / Luke M. Milligan.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 363 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Plugging into the Fourth Amendment's matrix
  • Violence as political expression
  • The quantity and quality of evidence
  • Modern implications I : peoplehood and inter-branch responsibilities
  • Modern implications II : precedent and political meaning
  • Expressive violence and southern honor
  • Slave locomotion
  • Mobility's meaning for the South
  • Mobility's meaning for the North
  • Privacy and property
  • Civil War and Reconstruction
  • Law on the street.
The modern law of search and seizure permits warrantless searches that ruin the citizenry's trust in law enforcement, harms minorities, and embraces an individualistic notion of the rights that it protects, ignoring essential roles that properly-conceived protections of privacy, mobility, and property play in uniting Americans. Many believe the Fourth Amendment is a poor bulwark against state tyrannies, particularly during the War on Terror. Historical amnesia has obscured the Fourth Amendment's positive aspects, and Andrew E. Taslitz rescues its forgotten history in "Reconstructing the Fourth Amendment", which includes two novel arguments. First, that the original Fourth Amendment of 1791 - born in political struggle between the English and the colonists - served important political functions, particularly in regulating expressive political violence. Second, that the Amendment's meaning changed when the Fourteenth Amendment was created to give teeth to outlawing slavery, and its focus shifted from primary emphasis on individualistic privacy notions as central to a white democratic polis to enhanced protections for group privacy, individual mobility, and property in a multi-racial republic.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780814782637 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 363 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Plugging into the Fourth Amendment's matrix
  • Violence as political expression
  • The quantity and quality of evidence
  • Modern implications I : peoplehood and inter-branch responsibilities
  • Modern implications II : precedent and political meaning
  • Expressive violence and southern honor
  • Slave locomotion
  • Mobility's meaning for the South
  • Mobility's meaning for the North
  • Privacy and property
  • Civil War and Reconstruction
  • Law on the street.
The modern law of search and seizure permits warrantless searches that ruin the citizenry's trust in law enforcement, harms minorities, and embraces an individualistic notion of the rights that it protects, ignoring essential roles that properly-conceived protections of privacy, mobility, and property play in uniting Americans. Many believe the Fourth Amendment is a poor bulwark against state tyrannies, particularly during the War on Terror. Historical amnesia has obscured the Fourth Amendment's positive aspects, and Andrew E. Taslitz rescues its forgotten history in "Reconstructing the Fourth Amendment", which includes two novel arguments. First, that the original Fourth Amendment of 1791 - born in political struggle between the English and the colonists - served important political functions, particularly in regulating expressive political violence. Second, that the Amendment's meaning changed when the Fourteenth Amendment was created to give teeth to outlawing slavery, and its focus shifted from primary emphasis on individualistic privacy notions as central to a white democratic polis to enhanced protections for group privacy, individual mobility, and property in a multi-racial republic.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780814782637 20160528
Green Library
Book
xxvii, 398 p. ; 27 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 42 p. ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 263 pages ; 24 cm
  • Reconnoitering the frontier, 1775-1899
  • Foreign influences, 1900-1945
  • Espionage and subversion, 1946-1978
  • Calm before the storm, 1979-2000
  • The total information idea, 2001-2015
  • Unreasonable searches
  • Fourth Amendment mirage
  • Enforcement problems
  • The privacy question.
Some see domestic intelligence gathering as a crucial task of national security, regardless of personal privacy. Others warn against a surveillance state that tramples constitutional rights. The idea of a total information state has both inspired and frightened Americans. In confronting these controversies, people appeal to law, liberty, or foreign policy to argue for or against surveilling the citizenry. The polarizing topics of surveillance, intelligence, privacy, and Fourth Amendment protections often produce more heat than light. Anthony Gregory offers a nuanced history and analysis of these vexing questions. He highlights the complex relationships between foreign and domestic intelligence, and between national security surveillance and countervailing efforts to safeguard individual privacy. The Fourth Amendment prohibiting unreasonable searches and seizures offers no panacea, he finds, in combating assaults on privacy--whether by the NSA, the FBI, local police, or more mundane administrative agencies. And, he notes, some of the high-stakes issues provoked by intelligence methods have little to do with privacy. Given the advancement of technology, together with the ambiguities and practical problems of Fourth Amendment enforcement, Gregory emphasizes that privacy advocates need to consider multiple policy fronts. -- Provided by publisher.
Green Library

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