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Book
56p. ; 4⁰.
find.galegroup.com Eighteenth Century Collections Online
Book
[2], iv, 3-43, [1]p. ; 4⁰.
find.galegroup.com Eighteenth Century Collections Online
Book
x, 238 p. ; 24 cm.
  • The culture of manhood
  • The grammar of manhood
  • The bachelor and other disorderly men
  • The family man and citizenship
  • The better sort and leadership
  • The heroic man and national destiny
  • The founders' gendered legacy.
An analysis of the writings and speeches of the American founders. Kann (political science, U. of Southern Calif.) looks at how the founders deployed a "grammar of manhood" that provided informal rules for stigmatizing disorderly men, justifying citizenship for deserving men, and elevating exceptio.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780814747148 20160528
Green Library
Book
xiii, 236 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
215 p.
Green Library
Book
215 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxv, 270 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
Benjamin Franklin was serious when he suggested the colonists arm themselves with the longbow. The American colonies were not logistically prepared for the revolution and this became painfully obvious in war's first years. Trade networks were destroyed, inflation undermined the economy, and American artisans could not produce or repair enough weapons to keep the Continental Army in the field. The Continental Congress responded to this crisis by mobilizing the nation's manufacturing sector for war.With information obtained from Europe through both commercial exchange and French military networks, Congress became familiar with the latest manufacturing techniques and processes of the nascent European industrial revolution. They therefore initiated an innovative program of munitions manufacturing under the Department of the Commissary General of Military Stores. The department gathered craftsmen and workers into three national arsenals where they were trained for the large-scale production of weapons. The department also engaged private manufacturers, providing them with materials and worker training, and instituting a program of inspecting their finished products. As historian Robert F. Smith relates in Manufacturing Independence: Industrial Innovation in the American Revolution, the colonies were able to provide their military with the arms it needed to fight, survive, and outlast the enemy-supplying weapons for the victory at Saratoga, rearming their armies in the South on three different occassions, and providing munitions to sustain the siege at Yorktown. But this manufacturing system not only successfully supported the Continental Army, it also demonstrated new production ideas to the nation. Through this system, the government went on to promote domestic manufacturing after the war, becoming a model for how the nation could produce goods for its own needs. The War for Independence was not just a political revolution, it was an integral part of the Industrial Revolution in America.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781594162473 20161031
Green Library
Book
2 v. (xxxii, 1,450 p.) ; 27 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
226 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
  • Theory
  • Medical history
  • Quacks and corpses
  • Medical feuds in Philadelphia
  • Medical feuds in the revolutionary army.
Focusing on doctors' feuds and duels, yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, and a court-martial of the medical director of army hospitals in the Revolutionary War, this title is set during a time when American medicine was caught in a period of catastrophic change.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780838641903 20160528
Green Library
Book
xi, 246 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of illustrations-- List of tables-- Acknowledgements-- Introduction-- 1. Extravagance and dissipation-- 2. Revolutionary transformations-- 3. 'A democracy of glee'-- 4. Butcher, baker, candlestick maker-- 5. A commercial community-- 6. Into the hands of the people-- Epilogue: 'from an infant stage'-- Tables-- Notes-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521825085 20160528
Theatre has often served as a touchstone for moments of political change or national definition and as a way of exploring cultural and ethnic identity. Heather Nathans examines the growth and influence of the theatre in the development of the young American Republic, from the Revolution through to the election of Thomas Jefferson in 1800. Unlike many works on the early American theatre, this book explores the lives and motives of the people working behind the scenes to establish a new national drama. Some of the most famous figures in American history, from George Washington to Sam Adams, from John Hancock to Alexander Hamilton, battled over the creation of the American theatre. The book traces their motives and strategies - suggesting that for many of these men, the question of whether or not Americans should go to the playhouse meant the difference between the success and failure of the Revolutionary mission.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521825085 20160528
Green Library
Book
xiv, 370 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
x, 233 p. ; 25 cm.
This first volume in a six-volume history of American journalism surveys the earliest printing in American colonies up to the revolutionary war. It focuses on the nature of journalism during the years covered and the direction it was taking.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780313275258 20160528
Green Library
Book
394 p.
Challenging carved-in-stone tenets of Christianity, deism began sprouting in colonial America in the early 18th century, was flourishing nicely by the American revolution, and to all intents and purposes was dead by 1811. Despite its hasty demise, deism left a theological legacy. Christian sensibility would never be quite the same again. Bringing together the works of six major American deists - Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Ethan Allen, Thomas Paine, Elihu Palmer and Philip Freneau - and the Frenchman Comte de Volney, whose writings greatly influenced American deists - Kerry Walters has created a full analysis of deism and rational religion in colonial and early America. In addition to presenting a chronological collection of several works by each author, he provides a description of deism's historical roots, its major themes, its social and political implications, and the reasons for its eventual demise as a movement. Essential readings from the three major deistic periodicals of the period - "Temple of Reason", "Prospect" and the "Theophilanthropist" - are also included in the volume. This is the first time they have been reprinted since their original publication. American deism is more than merely an antiquated philosophical position possessing only historical interest, Walters contends. Its search for a religion based upon the ideals of reason, nature and humanitarianism, rather than the blind faith, scriptural inerrancy, and miracles preached by Christian churches at the time, continues to offer insight of real significance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780700605408 20160527
Green Library
Book
306 p.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiv, 215 p. : 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)

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