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Book
1 online resource (15 pages) : digital, PDF file.
This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2005-September 2006. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in 2005 and 2006 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Twenty-six turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 62 at the Oregon Zoo in fall 2005. These turtles joined two that were held back from release in summer 2005 due to their small size. All 90 juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2006. Twenty-eight juvenile turtles were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 19 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 944; 285 for the Klickitat ponds, 158 for the Klickitat lake, 227 for the Skamania pond complex, and 274 at Pierce NWR. In 2006, 20 females from the Klickitat population were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Fifteen nests were located and protected; these produced 55 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. One wild hatchling captured in spring 2006 was placed in the head-start program to attain more growth in captivity. During the 2006 field season trapping effort, 414 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 374 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 179 individual painted turtles captured in 2006 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population.
Book
1 online resource (14 pages) : digital, PDF file.
This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2004-September 2005. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2004 and 2005 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Thirty-five turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 53 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 77 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2005. Four were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Eleven were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 39 at the Skamania site, and 5 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 257 for the Klickitat ponds, 136 for the Klickitat lake, 206 for the Skamania pond complex, and 255 at Pierce NWR. In 2005, 34 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-four nests were located and protected; these produced 90 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. During the 2005 field season trapping effort, 486 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 430 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 216 individual painted turtles captured in 2005 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 75% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2004 through September 2005.
Book
1 online resource (23 pages) : digital, PDF file.
This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of June 2002-September 2003. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2002 and 2003 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. In 2002, 27 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored until they nested. Four more females carrying old transmitters were also monitored; only one of these transmitters lasted through the nesting season. In 2003, 30 females were monitored. Twenty-three of the females monitored in 2002 nested and produced 84 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in fall 2002 and reared in captivity at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in the head-start program. Twenty-seven of the turtles monitored in 2003 nested. Six of the turtles nested twice, producing a total of 33 nests. The nests will be checked in September and October 2003 for hatchlings. Of 121 head-started juvenile western pond turtles collected in the Columbia Gorge during the 2001 nesting season, 119 were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2002, and 2 held over for additional growth. Of 86 turtles reared in the head-start program at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos fall 2002 through summer 2003, 67 were released at sites in the Columbia Gorge in summer of 2003, and 15 held over for more growth. Fifty-nine juveniles were released at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge in July 2002, and 51 released there in July 2003. Sixteen of those released in 2002 and 16 released in 2003 were instrumented with radio transmitters and monitored for varying amounts of time for survival and habitat use between the time of release and August 2003, together with juveniles from the 2001 release which were monitored from June 2001 through August 2003, and juveniles from the 2000 release which were monitored from August 2000 through August 2003. The number of functioning transmitters varied due to transmitter failures and detachments, and availability of replacement transmitters, as well as opportunities to recapture turtles. By August 15, 2003, a total of 39 turtles were being monitored: 6 from the 2000 release, 8 from the 2001 release, 10 from the 2002 release, and 15 from the 2003 release. During the 2002 field season trapping effort, 280 turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 236 previously head-started turtles. During the 2003 trapping season, 349 turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge; 304 of these had been head-started. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual re-sightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 160 individual painted turtles captured in 2002 and 189 painted turtles captured in 2003 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Eight female painted turtles were monitored by telemetry during the 2002 nesting season; 4 nests were recorded for these animals, plus 35 nests located incidentally. Preferred habitat for nesting was identified based on the telemetry results, to be considered in anticipating future turtle habitat needs and in management planning at Pierce NWR. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding supported activities in the Columbia River Gorge from June 2002 through September 2003.
Book
1 online resource (18 pages) : digital, PDF file.
This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2003-September 2004. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2003 and 2004 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Sixty-nine turtles were over-wintered at the Woodland Park Zoo and 69 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 136 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2004. Two were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Thirty-four were released at the Klickitat ponds, 19 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 62 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 246 for the Klickitat ponds, 114 for the Klickitat lake, 167 for the Skamania pond complex, and 250 at Pierce NWR. In 2004, 32 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-one of the females nested and produced 85 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and October and transported to the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos for rearing in the head-start program. Data collection for a four-year telemetry study of survival and habitat use by juvenile western pond turtles at Pierce NWR concluded in 2004. Radio transmitters on study animals were replaced as needed until all replacements were in service; afterward, the turtles were monitored until their transmitters failed. The corps of study turtles ranged from 39 in August 2003 to 2 turtles at the end of August 2004. These turtles showed the same seasonal pattern of movements between summer water and upland winter habitats observed in previous years. During the 2004 field season trapping effort, 345 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 297 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 224 individual painted turtles captured in 2004 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 60% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2003 through September 2004.
Book
1 online resource (51 pages) : color illustrations, color maps
Book
viii, 199 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Book
xvi, 221 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
  • Foreword / by Stephen Curley
  • Preface
  • Sea turtles and the threats to their survival
  • Sea turtle species
  • The nesting experience
  • Threats to sea turtles
  • A traveler's guide to sea turtles
  • United States
  • California and the West Coast
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Hawaii
  • North Carolina
  • South Carolina
  • Texas
  • Caribbean islands
  • Cayman Islands sea turtle farming
  • Cuba
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Puerto Rico
  • St. Eustatius
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • US Virgin Islands
  • Mexico
  • Baja California Sur
  • Colima
  • Guerrero
  • Oaxaca
  • Quintana Roo
  • Central America
  • Costa Rica
  • El Salvador
  • Guatemala
  • Nicaragua
  • Panama
  • South America
  • Brazil
  • Uruguay
  • Mediterranean Sea
  • Mediterranean Association to Save the Sea Turtles, Athens
  • The Sea Turtle Protection Society of Greece, Zakynthos
  • Africa
  • Cape Verde
  • Gabon
  • Ghana
  • Kenya, Watamu Turtle Program
  • Mozambique
  • South Africa
  • Indian Ocean
  • India
  • Oman
  • South Pacific
  • National Park of American Samoa/National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa
  • Australia
  • Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
  • Indonesia
  • Ulithi Sea Turtle Project, Micronesia
  • Samoa
  • Arnavons Community Marine Conservation Area, Solomon Islands
  • Captive encounters
  • Reef HQ Aquarium, Australia
  • Neotropical Foundation, Tenerife, Canary Islands
  • Xcaret, Quintana Roo, Mexico
  • South Africa
  • United States
  • Resources and organizations.
Sea turtle populations around the world are endangered, and in recent years tourism has been a critical element in worldwide efforts to save them. More travelers seek meaningful experiences that bring them close to nature and wildlife, and opportunities to interact with and help sea turtles now exist at locations around the globe, from remote beaches to urban labs. In A Worldwide Travel Guide to Sea Turtles, a scientist, a conservationist, and a journalist have come together to provide a guide to the places where people can view sea turtles and participate in authentic conservation projects. Covering five continents and including the South Pacific and Caribbean, the authors direct readers to the parks, reserves, and research sites where they can responsibly observe turtles in the wild, especially nesting beaches where people can see female sea turtles lay eggs and hatchlings make their harrowing journey from nest to sea. Options for on-site lodging and other amenities are included, if available, as well as details of other nearby attractions that travelers may wish to include in their itineraries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781623491611 20160616
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Book
v, 31 p. ; 30 cm.
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Book
116 p. : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 184 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
37 pages : color illustrations, 2 color maps ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
2 volumes (108; 16 pages) : color illustrations ; 21 cm
  • [1] Uma ação de resultados
  • [2] Místicas e interações : caderno de exercícios.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Video
1 online resource (12 min.)
In 2001, the Ashaninka community of the river Amonia adopted a new system for the sustainable management of the tracajá, a type of river turtle that had become scarce due to over-consumption of its eggs and meat by whites and Indians.
www.aspresolver.com Alexander Street Anthropology
Video
1 online resource (11 min.)
In 2001, the Ashaninka community of the river Amonia adopted a new system for the sustainable management of the tracajá, a type of river turtle that had become scarce due to over-consumption of its eggs and meat by whites and Indians.
www.aspresolver.com Alexander Street Anthropology
Book
xi, 172 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 23 cm.
  • Black vultures (Coragyps atratus) foraging on olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) sea turtle eggs and hatchlings / Joanna Burger and Michael Gochfeld
  • Spatial-temporal distribution of Kemp's ridley turtles (Lepidochelys kempi) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nests in a beach of the north of veracruz, mexico / Jorge E. Morales-Mávil, Laura Acela Contreras-Vega, Arturo Serrano, Jazmín Cobos-Silva and Leonel Zavaleta-Lizárraga --Spirorchiidiosis and other forms of parasitosis in sea turtles on the coast of Brazil / Max Rondon Werneck, Hassan Jerdy Leandro and Eulógio Carlos Queiroz Carvalho
  • Mitigation strategies for the reduction of sea turtle bycatch in the Mediterranean bottom trawl fisheries / Alessandro Lucchetti, Jacopo Pulcinella, Valeria Angelini, Sauro Pari, Tommaso Russo, Stefano Cataudella and Massimo Virgili
  • Marine turtles : conservation strategies and future research / Ohiana Revuelta.
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Book
xii, 338 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
The journals of early maritime explorers traversing the Atlantic Ocean often describe swarms of sea turtles, once a plentiful source of food. Many populations had been decimated by the 1950s, when Archie Carr and others raised public awareness of their plight. One species, the green turtle, has been the most heavily exploited due to international demand for turtle products, especially green turtle soup. The species has achieved some measure of recovery due to thirty years of conservation efforts, but remains endangered. In "The Case of the Green Turtle", Alison Rieser provides an unparalleled look into the way science and conservation interact by focusing on the most controversial aspect of green turtle conservation-farming. While proponents argued that farming green sea turtles would help save them, opponents countered that it encouraged a taste for turtle flesh that would lead to the slaughter of wild stocks. The clash of these viewpoints once riveted the world. Rieser relies on her expertise in ocean ecology, policy, and law to reveal how the efforts to preserve sea turtles changed marine conservation and the way we view our role in the environment. Her study of this early conservation controversy will fascinate anyone who cares about sea turtles or the oceans in which they live.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781421405797 20160609
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Video
1 videodisc (approximately 70 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical. Dolby Digital. Video: NTSC. Digital: video file. DVD video.
"Sea turtles globally are in trouble, and human activities are largely to blame. The most critically endangered sea turtle in the world, the Kemp's Ridley, is in the most danger of becoming extinct. Once heralded as an endangered species success story in the making, it would all change after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. This feature length documentary focuses on a record-breaking sea turtle stranding season in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, where over 1,200 cold-stunned sea turtles washed ashore, over 90 percent of the Kemp's Ridley sea turtles. Hundreds of people from over 10 states and 21 institutions came together to rescue these cold-stunned sea turtles, which also features 'the largest airlift of an endangered species, probably anywhere in the United States, and quite possibly the world.' It will take the actions of humans in New England, Texas, Georgia and across the United States and in Mexico to prevent the extinction and determine the ultimate survival of the Kemp's Ridley sea turtle."--Container.
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
360 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
252 pages, [16] pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 24 cm
A passionate account by an ardent conservationist who records his experiences while undertaking fundamental research, this book details how sea turtles are suddenly struggling to survive, largely because of harm that has been done to the planet's oceans and beaches. Much can be learned about the condition of the planet's environment by looking at sea turtles because they have existed for more than 100 million years and travel throughout the world's oceans. Including descriptions of the life cycles of turtles as well as fascinating facts, this book asks what their demise means for the human species. The remarkable story also highlights the active role South Africa has played in protecting its own sea turtle population and researching the turtle populations in neighboring countries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781431405626 20160612
Green Library

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