Book
xv, 363 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • Introduction-- Section A: Theory-- Part 1: Background-- History And Methods-- Critiques Of Transparency-- Part 2: Definitions And Models-- Definitions Of Transparency-- Fair Allocation Systems-- Population Level Transparency-- Equality Of Narrative Power-- Transparency In An Age Of Big Data-- Section B: Practice-- Part 1: Transparency 1.0-- Every Day Is A Fight For Information-- Access To Information Laws (Ati)-- Social Audit And Public Reporting-- International Initiatives-- Open Data And Forced Disclosure-- Editorial Control-- Regulation And Transparency-- Part 2: Transparency 2.0-- Ceding Control Of The Data-- Independent Narratives-- Getting My Own Data-- Surveillance, Transparency And Privacy-- Part 3: Transparency 3.0-- Artificial Intelligence And Allocation Systems-- What Happens Next?.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781447325369 20170502
Using case studies from around the world including India, Tanzania, the UK and US, Transparency and the open society surveys the adoption of transparency globally, providing an essential framework for assessing its likely performance as a policy and the steps that can be taken to make it more effective.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781447325369 20170502
Green Library
Book
182 p.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 231 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Transparency in Historical Perspective-- Varieties of Transparency-- Transparency as a Human Right-- Transparency as an Instrumental Value-- Transparency and the Ethics of Communication-- The More Closely We Are Watched, the Better We Behave?-- Dashed Expectations: Governmental Adaptation to Transparency Rules-- What Hope Freedom of Information in th UK-- Member State Bedgetary Transparency in the Economic and Monetary Union-- Does Transparency Make a Difference? The Example of European Council of Ministers-- Varieties of Software and their Implications for Effective Democratic Government-- Transparency and Digital Government-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780197263839 20160528
'Transparency' is widely canvassed as a key to better governance, increasing trust in public-office holders. But transparency is more often preached than practised, more often referred to than defined, and more often advocated than critically analysed. This volume exposes this fashionable doctrine to critical scrutiny from a range of disciplinary perspectives, including political science, philosophy and economics. The volume traces the history of transparency as a doctrine of good governance and social organization, and identifies its different forms; it assesses the benefits and drawbacks of measures to enhance various forms of transparency; and examines how institutions respond to measures intended to increase transparency, and with what consequences. Transparency is shown not to be a new doctrine. It can come into conflict with other doctrines of good governance, and there are some important exceptions to Jeremy Bentham's famous dictum that 'the more closely we are watched, the better we behave'. And instead of heralding a new culture of openness in government, measures to improve transparency tend to lead to tighter and more centralised management of information.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780197263839 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
1 online resource (iv, 68 pages) : color illustrations
Book
xvii, 129 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 116 p. ; 24 cm.
  • 1 Introduction 2 Advancing Excellence and Public Trust in Government 3 Part I: The Challenge 4 Chapter 1: The Challenge of Resurrecting the Public Trust 5 Chapter 2: Serving the Public to Restore the Public Trust 6 Part II: Promoting Transparency 7 Chapter 3: Promoting Transparency in Local Governments 8 Chapter 4: Bringing Transparency to Public Budgeting 9 Chapter 5: Using the Internet to Create Transparency in State Budgets 10 Chapter 6: Transparency in the Contracting Process 11 Chapter 7: Higher Education as Transparency Challenged 12 Chapter 8: Transparency and Cleaning Up Local Governments 13 Chapter 9:Measuring Government Performance and Officials' Qualifications 14 Chapter 10: A "Bottoms Up" Approach to State Transparency 15 Chapter 11: Issues in Transparency and Restoring the Public Trust 16 Part III: Performance Measures and Reform 17 Chapter 12: Measuring Government Performance to Promote Transparency 18 Chapter 13: Transparency and Measuring What Governments Do 19 Chapter 14: Targeted Transparency 20 David Weil 21 Chapter 15: Transparency in the Broader Context of Governance and Civic Engagement 22 Part IV: Transforming General Governance 23 Chapter 16: Making a Difference in People's Lives to Regain the Public Trust 24 Chapter 17: The Need to Establish the Purpose of Government 25 Paula Gordon 26 Chapter 18: Civic Engagement and Transparency for Regaining the Public Trust 27 Contributors.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739145449 20160605
Over the last four decades the public trust in government in the United States has fallen dramatically due to a "perfect storm" of contributing factors, such as a seemingly never ending string of political scandals, partisan polarization and toxic attack politics, and miserable failures to respond to natural disasters or the devastation of the Great Recession. This book contains the academic presentations that were made at the Symposium on Advancing Excellence and Public Trust in Government that was held at the National Press Club in Washington D.C. on September 17, 2007. In particular, the Symposium focused upon how improving transparency in governmental operations could be used to assuage some of the popular doubts about and hostility toward America's governments. There was certainly a very broad consensus at the Symposium that transparency in government is extremely desirable, needs to be improved, will bring reform and improvement to the public sector, and should make a major contribution to the restoration of the public trust in the United States. Indeed, support for improved transparency can be found across the political spectrum, as both conservatives and liberals believe that more openness in government will promote parts of their very different policy agendas. Truly, transparency appears to be an all-American issue. The discussion at the Symposium revolved around three broad themes. The first concerned transparency about government operations per se, such as how decisions were made and what detailed budgets are. A second and somewhat broader theme concerned greater transparency of "performance measures" which tell us what the effects of specific policies are and how effective or efficient government agencies are. Third and even more broadly, some of the participants argued that general questions of governance provide the key for a renewal of public trust among our citizenry. This book of presentations at the Symposium is organized into four parts based on this distinction. Part I contains.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739145449 20160605
Green Library

7. Transparencia [1997 - ]

Journal/Periodical
volumes : illustrations ; 27 cm
Hoover Library
Book
127 pages ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
85 pages ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource : illustrations (black and white)
  • PART 1: INTRODUCTION -- 1. The Multi-Faceted Concept of Transparency -- Jens Forssbaeck and Lars Oxelheim -- PART 2: POLICY TRANSPARENCY -- 2. Constitutional Transparency -- Richard J. Sweeney -- 3. Monetary Policy Transparency -- Petra M. Geraats -- 4. Fiscal Policy Transparency -- Iain Begg -- 5. Transparent and Unique Sovereign Default Risk Assessment -- Edward I. Altman and Herbert Rijken -- 6. Transparency and Competition Policy in an Imperfectly Competitive World -- Philippe Gugler -- 7. Transparency in International Trade Policy -- Michael G. Plummer and Alissa Tafti -- 8. Transparency of Climate Change Policies, Markets, and Corporate Practices -- Thomas L. Brewer and Michael Mehling -- 9. Transparency of Human Resource Policy -- Erik Mellander -- 10. Transparency of Innovation Policy -- Bo Carlsson -- PART 3: INSTITUTIONAL, MARKET AND REGULATORY TRANSPARENCY -- 11. Labor Market Transparency -- Eskil Wadensjo -- 12. Transparency in Financial Regulation -- James R. Barth, Apanard (Penny) Prabha, and Clas Wihlborg -- 13. Price Transparency and International Market Integration -- Richard Friberg -- 14. Transparency of Inward Investment Incentives -- Frederick Lehmann and Ana Teresa Lehmann -- 15. Transparency and Corruption -- Alvaro Cuervo-Cazurra -- PART 4: CORPORATE TRANSPARENCY -- 16. Multinational Corporations' Relationship with Political Actors: Transparency versus Opacity -- Pervez N. Ghauri, Amjad Hadjikhani, and Cecilia Pahlberg -- 17. Corporate Governance and Optimal Transparency -- Tom Berglund -- 18. Transparency Differences at the Top of the Organization: Market-Pull versus Strategic Hoarding Forces -- Winfried Ruigrok, Dimitrios Georgakakis, and Peder Greve -- 19 . Governance Transparency and the Institutions of Capitalism: Implications for Finance -- Raj Aggarwal and John Goodell -- 20. Transparency and Executive Compensation -- Raghavendra Rau -- 21. Transparency and Disclosure in the Global Microfinance Industry -- Leif Atle Beisland, Roy Mersland, and Trond Randoy -- 22. Accounting Transparency and International Standard-Setting -- Sidney J. Gray and Helen Kang -- 23. Transparency of Fair Value Accounting and Tax -- Eva Eberhartinger and Soojin Lee -- 24. Transparency of Corporate Risk Management and Performance -- Peter McKay -- 25. Stress Testing, Transparency and Uncertainty in European Banking: What impacts? -- Rym Ayadi and Willem Pieter De Groen.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199917693 20160617
In recent years, the term 'transparency' has emerged as one of the most popular and keenly-touted concepts around. In the economic-political debate, the principle of transparency is often advocated as a prerequisite for accountability, legitimacy, policy efficiency, and good governance, as well as a universal remedy against corruption, corporate and political scandals, financial crises, and a host of other problems. But transparency is more than a mere catch-phrase. Increased transparency is a bearing ideal behind regulatory reform in many areas, including financial reporting and banking regulation. Individual governments as well as multilateral bodies have launched broad-based initiatives to enhance transparency in both economic and other policy domains. Parallel to these developments, the concept of transparency has seeped its way into academic research in a wide range of social science disciplines, including the economic sciences. This increased importance of transparency in economics and business studies has called for a reference work that surveys existing research on transparency and explores its meaning and significance in different areas. The Oxford Handbook of Economic and Institutional Transparency is such a reference. Comprised of authoritative yet accessible contributions by leading scholars, this Handbook addresses questions such as: What is transparency? What is the rationale for transparency? What are the determinants and the effects of transparency? And is transparency always beneficial, or can it also be detrimental (if so, when)? The chapters are presented in three sections that correspond to three broad themes. The first section addresses transparency in different areas of economic policy. The second section covers institutional transparency and explores the role of transparency in market integration and regulation. Finally, the third section focuses on corporate transparency. Taken together, this volume offers an up-to-date account of existing work on and approaches to transparency in economic research, discusses open questions, and provides guidance for future research, all from a blend of disciplinary perspectives.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199917693 20160617
Book
224 p. : ill.
  • pt. 1. Key documents of the global forum for peer reviews. Terms of reference
  • Revised methodology for peer review and non-member reviews
  • Assessment criteria
  • pt. 2. Main sources of standards. Article 26 of the OECD Model Tax Convention on Income and on Capital and its commentary
  • The 2002 Model Agreement on Exchange of Information on Tax Matters and its commentary
  • Enabling effective exchange of information : availability and reliability standard, the Joint Ad Hoc Group on Accounts (JAHGA) report
  • The 2006 OECD manual on information exchange : module on general and legal aspects of exchange of information
  • The 2006 OECD manual on information exchange : module 1 on exchange of information request
  • The OECD's project on harmful tax practices consolidated application note guidance in applying the 1998 report to preferential tax regimes.
dx.doi.org OECD iLibrary
Green Library
Book
376 p. : ill ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
123 p. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
346 p. : ill.; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 30 cm.
Green Library

17. Annual report [ - 2019]

Journal/Periodical
volumes : color illustrations ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
100 pages ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
87 pages ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
91 pages ; 23 cm.
Green Library

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