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Book
xi, 290 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
In the London summer of 1894, members of the National Vigilance Society, led by the well-known social reformer Laura Ormiston Chant, confronted the Empire Theatre of Varieties, Leicester Square, and its brilliant manager George Edwardes, as he applied for a routine license renewal. On grounds that the Empire's promenade was the nightly resort of prostitutes, that the costumes in the theatre's ballets were grossly indecent, and that the moral health of the nation was imperiled, Chant demanded that the London County Council either deny the theatre its license or require radical changes in the Empire's entertainment and clientele before granting renewal. The resulting license restriction and the tremendous public controversy that ensued raised important issues - social, cultural, intellectual, and moral - still pertinent today. "Fantasies of Empire" is the first book to recount, in full, the story of the Empire licensing controversy, in all its captivating detail. Contemporaneous accounts are interwoven with Donohue's identification and analysis of the larger issues raised: what the controversy reveals about contemporary sexual and social relations, what light it sheds on opposing views regarding the place of art and entertainment in modern society, and what it says about the pervasive effect of British imperialism on society's behavior in the later years of Queen Victoria's reign. Donohue connects the controversy to one of the most interesting developments in the history of modern theatre, the simultaneous emergence of a more sophisticated, varied, and moneyed audience and a municipal government insistent on its right to control and regulate that audience's social and cultural character and even its moral behavior. Rich in illustrations and entertainingly written, "Fantasies of Empire" will appeal to theatre, dance, and social historians, and to students of popular entertainment, the Victorian period, urban studies, gender studies, leisure studies, and the social history of architecture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780877459606 20160528
Green Library
Archive/Manuscript
4 folders.
A diary, 1883, and notebook, n.d. The purchase included miscellaneous letters, one group primarily from Charles Baker to "Winston" at a time when he was running the Haymarket Theater, 1810-1820. Also seemingly unrelated to Horne are a group of production contracts.
Special Collections
Book
[4], 76; [6], 47, [1]; 32,17-113, [1]p. ; 8⁰.
find.galegroup.com Eighteenth Century Collections Online
Book
393 p. illus., ports. 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 354 p. illus. 29 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xi, 252 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
xx, 609 pages ; 30 cm
Theatre in London has celebrated a rich and influential history, and in 1976 the first volume of J. P. Wearing's reference series provided researchers with an indispensable resource of these productions. In the decades since the original calendars were produced, several research aids have become available, notably various reference works and the digitization of important newspapers and relevant periodicals. The second edition of The London Stage 1890-1899: A Calendar of Productions, Performers, and Personnel provides a chronological calendar of London shows from the first of January, 1890, through the 31st of December, 1899. The volume chronicles more than 3,000 productions at 31 major central London theatres during this period. For each entry the following information is provided: *Title *Author *Theatre *Performers *Personnel *Opening and Closing Dates *Number of Performances Other details include genre of the production, number of acts, and a list of reviews. A comment section includes other interesting information, such as plot description, first-night reception by the audience, noteworthy performances, staging elements, and details of performances in New York either prior to or after the London production. Among the plays staged in London during this decade were Alice in Wonderland, Arms and the Man, Cyrano de Bergerac, An Ideal Husband, The Prisoner of Zenda, and The Second Mrs. Tanqueray, as well as numerous musical comedies (British and American), foreign works, operas, and revivals of English classics. A definitive resource, this edition revises, corrects, and expands the original calendar. In addition, approximately 20 percent of the material-in particular, information of adaptations and translations, plot sources, and comment information-is new. Arranged chronologically, the shows are fully indexed by title, genre, and theatre. A general index includes numerous subject entries on such topics as acting, audiences, censorship, costumes, managers, performers, prompters, staging, and ticket prices. The London Stage 1890-1899 will be of value to scholars, theatrical personnel, librarians, writers, journalists, and historians.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810892811 20160617
Green Library
Book
xxi, 709 pages ; 29 cm
For centuries, London theatre has celebrated a rich and influential history, and in 1976, the first volume of J. P. Wearing's reference series provided scholars and other researchers with an indispensable resource of these productions. In the decades since the original calendars were produced, several research aids have become available, notably various reference works and the digitization of important newspapers and relevant periodicals. The London Stage 1900-1909 A Calendar of Productions, Performers, and Personnel, Second Edition provides a chronological calendar of London shows from January 1900 through December 1909. The volume chronicles more than 3,000 productions at 35 selected, major central London theatres during this period. For each entry the following information is provided: *Title *Author *Theatre *Performers *Personnel *Opening and Closing Dates *Number of Performances Other details include genre of the production, number of acts, and references to reviews. A comment section includes other interesting information, such as a plot description, the first-night reception by the audience, noteworthy performances, staging elements, and details of performances in New York either prior to or after the London production. Among the plays staged in London during this decade were Candida, His House in Order, The Only Way, The Playboy of the Western World, Raffles (The Amateur Cracksman), and The Scarlet Pimpernel, as well as numerous musical comedies (British and American), foreign works, operas, and revivals of English classics. A definitive resource, this edition revises, corrects, and expands the original, well-received calendar. In addition, approximately 20 percent of the material-in particular, information of adaptations and translations, plot sources, and comment information-is new. Arranged chronologically, the shows are indexed fully by title, genre, and theatre. A general index also includes numerous subject entries on such topics as acting, audiences, censorship, costumes, managers, performers, prompters, staging, ticket prices, or other relevant subjects. An authoritative reference providing essential details, this work will be of value to scholars, theatrical personnel, librarians, writers, journalists, and historians.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810892934 20160613
Green Library
Book
xxi, 775 pages ; 29 cm
Theatre in London has celebrated a rich and influential history, and in 1976 the first volume of J. P. Wearing's reference series provided researchers with an indispensable resource of these productions. In the decades since the original calendars were produced, several research aids have become available, notably various reference works and the digitization of relevant newspapers and periodicals. This second edition of The London Stage 1910-1919: A Calendar of Productions, Performers, and Personnel provides a chronological calendar of London shows from January 1910 through December 1919. The volume chronicles more than 3,000 productions at 35 major central London theatres during this period. For each entry the following information is provided: *Title *Author *Theatre *Performers *Personnel *Opening and closing dates *Number of performances Other details include genre of the production, number of acts, and a list of reviews. A comment section includes other interesting information, such as a plot description, first-night audience reception, noteworthy performances, staging elements, and details of performances in New York either prior to or after the London production. Among the plays staged in London during this decade were Chu Chin Chow, The Gaol Gate, Hindle Wakes, Justice, Kismet, Pygmalion, and Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, as well as numerous musical comedies (British and American), foreign works, operas, and revivals of English classics. A definitive resource, this edition revises, corrects, and expands the original calendar. In addition, approximately 20 percent of the material-in particular, information on adaptations and translations, plot sources, and comments-is new. Arranged chronologically, the shows are fully indexed by title, genre, and theatre. A general index includes numerous subject entries on such topics as acting, audiences, censorship, costumes, managers, performers, prompters, staging, and ticket prices. The London Stage 1910-1919 will be of value to scholars, theatrical personnel, librarians, writers, journalists, and historians.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810892996 20160614
Green Library
Book
88 p. : col. ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
xii, 109 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
For all its wonderful achievements, both on stage and off, Market Harborough Drama Society had something else to be proud of when it reached its 75th anniversary this year. It was a milestone worthy of celebration - and some of the more pro-active members of the society got to work organising what form those celebrations should take. A number of events were planned. One aim was to update the book Stage By Stage, first published during the society's diamond jubilee year in 1993. It was decided that, when the book was updated in the 75th anniversary year, the original Stage By Stage, conceived and written as a labour of love by the late Arthur Jones, who had long-standing links with the society, should remain intact. His efforts had produced a fascinating and valuable account of the society's colourful past, and it was agreed his original text should not be altered. Updating the book, however, would take just as much time and effort, as the last 15 years had seen many changes, as well as a number of memorable plays and performances. It would be a collaborative process. Many members of the drama society would contribute memories and stories to help fill its pages. Though impossible to mention everyone who has contributed to the theatre and the drama society over the years, the aim of the new version of Stage By Stage is to promote and showcase what the society does, as well as capture and preserve, in writing, its important place within the town's history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781848760738 20160528
Green Library
Book
xiv, 310 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Preface-- Part I. The theatre restored: 1660-1700: 1. The material circumstance-- 2. The drama-- 3. Actors and acting-- Part II. The theatre reformed: 1700-1737: 4. The material circumstance-- 5. The drama-- 6. Actors and acting-- Part III. The theatre tamed: 1737-1789: 7. The material circumstance-- 8. The drama-- 9. Actors and acting-- Part IV. Theatre in the age of reform: 1789-1843: 10. The material circumstance-- 11. The drama-- 12. Actors and acting-- Part V. The theatre industry: 1843-1901: 13. The material circumstance-- 14. The drama-- 15. Actors and acting-- Index of plays.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521839259 20160528
This introduction aims to share with readers the author's enjoyment of the turbulent 240-year history of a theatre that tried, often against the odds, to be 'modern'. In each of its five parts, it deals successively with history and cultural context, with the plays and the actors who caught the imagination of their era. Peter Thomson's text, always approachable, is enriched by quotations and carefully selected illustrations that capture 'the spirit of the age' under consideration. Beginning with the reopening of the playhouses under licence from Charles II, Thomson introduces the modern English theatre by breaking off at key dates - 1700, 1737, 1789 and 1843 - in order to explore both continuity and innovation. Familiar names and well-known plays feature alongside the forgotten and neglected. This is a reading of dramatic history that keeps constantly in mind the material circumstances that produced, and sometimes oppressed, a supremely popular theatre.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521839259 20160528
Green Library
Book
232 p. ; 25 cm. (bk.)
Green Library
Book
xv, 382 p. ; 23 cm.
Michael Billington's own selection from 20 years of reviewing for "The Guardian" - from 1971, with Ralph Richardson in John Osborne's "West of Suez" and Olivier in "Long Day's Journey into Night", through two decades of theatrical events such as Ken Dodd, "Amadeus" and Peter Hall's National, up to "Carmen Jones" and the new David Hare of 1991. Chronologically arranged with a 5000-word introduction on the critic's role, his reviews and "think pieces" add up to an authoritative, yet personal history of the theatre of our generation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781854591852 20160528
Green Library

20. Roscius Anglicanus [1987]

Book
xxviii, 164 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library

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