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Book
1 v. (various pagings) ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 420 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 420 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Dreams of glory
  • An ugly scene : Duke meets Durham
  • So many stories, so few injuries
  • Police : from disbelief to creativity
  • Cops ignite firestorm, Duke runs for cover
  • The most dangerous power : enter Nifong
  • Politically correct sensationalism
  • An academic mob
  • A college president's test of courage
  • Politics trumps law
  • Blind injustice : indicted after proven innocent
  • Nifong defeats the evidence
  • Investigation vindicates team, Duke trashes it
  • DA hides evidence, Evans fights back
  • Lacrosse reinstated, with disrespect
  • Nifong defies gravity
  • Turning the tide
  • Nifong wins election, proves his criminality
  • Falling apart fast
  • End
  • No isolated case : from Duke to death row
  • The rape of due process : feminist overkill
  • Betraying their students : identity politics in higher education.
Green Library
Book
vii, 370 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • The foundations of the frenzy
  • Misleading through statistics
  • The realities of "rape culture"
  • Denying due process
  • Media malpractice
  • The witch-hunt mentality
  • College athletes : myths and realities
  • The witch hunt intensifies
  • From campus to criminal law
  • A new generation's contempt for civil rights
  • Conclusion.
"In recent years, politicians led by President Obama and prominent senators and governors have teamed with extremists on campus to portray our nation's campuses as awash in a violent crime wave-and to suggest (preposterously) that university leaders, professors, and students are indifferent to female sexual assault victims in their midst. Neither of these claims has any bearing in reality. But they have achieved widespread acceptance, thanks in part to misleading alarums from the Obama Administration and biased media coverage led by the New York Times. The panic about campus rape has helped stimulate-and has been fanned by-ideologically skewed campus sexual assault policies and lawless commands issued by federal bureaucrats to force the nation's all-too-compliant colleges and universities essentially to presume the guilt of accused students. The result has been a widespread disregard of such bedrock American principles as the presumption of innocence and the need for fair play. This book will use hard facts to set the record straight. It will, among other things, explore about two dozen of the many cases since 2010 in which innocent or probably innocent students have been branded as sex criminals and expelled or otherwise punished by their colleges. And it will show why all students-and, eventually, society as a whole-are harmed when our nation's universities abandon pursuit of truth and seek instead to accommodate the passions of the mob"-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 370 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • The foundations of the frenzy
  • Misleading through statistics
  • The realities of "rape culture"
  • Denying due process
  • Media malpractice
  • The witch-hunt mentality
  • College athletes : myths and realities
  • The witch hunt intensifies
  • From campus to criminal law
  • A new generation's contempt for civil rights
  • Conclusion.
"In recent years, politicians led by President Obama and prominent senators and governors have teamed with extremists on campus to portray our nation's campuses as awash in a violent crime wave-and to suggest (preposterously) that university leaders, professors, and students are indifferent to female sexual assault victims in their midst. Neither of these claims has any bearing in reality. But they have achieved widespread acceptance, thanks in part to misleading alarums from the Obama Administration and biased media coverage led by the New York Times. The panic about campus rape has helped stimulate-and has been fanned by-ideologically skewed campus sexual assault policies and lawless commands issued by federal bureaucrats to force the nation's all-too-compliant colleges and universities essentially to presume the guilt of accused students. The result has been a widespread disregard of such bedrock American principles as the presumption of innocence and the need for fair play. This book will use hard facts to set the record straight. It will, among other things, explore about two dozen of the many cases since 2010 in which innocent or probably innocent students have been branded as sex criminals and expelled or otherwise punished by their colleges. And it will show why all students-and, eventually, society as a whole-are harmed when our nation's universities abandon pursuit of truth and seek instead to accommodate the passions of the mob"-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (1 v.)
  • The idea of mismatch and why it matters
  • A primer on affirmative action
  • The discovery of the mismatch effect
  • Law school mismatch
  • The debate on law school mismatch
  • The breadth of mismatch
  • Proposition 209: the high road and the low road
  • The warming effect
  • Mismatch and the swelling ranks of graduates
  • The hydra of preferences: the evasion of prop 209 at the University of California
  • Why academics avoid honest debate about affirmative action
  • Media, politics, and the accountability void
  • The supreme court: rewarding opacity
  • The George Mason affair
  • Transparency and the California Bar affair
  • Class, race, and the targeting of preferences
  • Closing the test score gap: better parenting and K-12 education.
Affirmative action in higher education started in the late 1960s as a noble effort to jump-start racial integration in American society and create the conditions for genuine equal opportunity. Forty years later, it has evolved into a swampland of posturing, concealment, pork-barrel set-asides, and-worst of all-a preferences system so blind to its own shortcomings that it ends up hurting the very minorities educators set out to help. Over the past several years, economist, law professor and civil rights activist Richard Sander has led a national consortium of more than two dozen nonpartisan scholars to study the operation and effects of preferences in higher education. In Mismatch, he and journalist Stuart Taylor present a rich and data-driven picture of the way affirmative action works (and doesn't work) in this setting. Though their liberal leanings would indicate support for race-based policies, Sander and Taylor argue that the research shows that affirmative action does not in fact help minorities. Racial preferences in higher education put a great many students in educational settings where they have no hope of competing-a phenomenon that they call "mismatch." American law schools provide a particularly vivid illustration of how "mismatch" harms the educations and careers of many minority students. Compelling evidence shows that racial preferences double the rate at which black students fail bar exams and may well in the end reduce, rather than increase, the aggregate number of black lawyers. Moreover, because preferences are targeted at upper-middle class minorities, they help shut low-income students of all races out of much of higher education. If you're black and poor-or white and poor, for that matter-your chances of stepping into the halls of some of the nation's most elite institutions are no greater than they were in the 1960s. Unfortunately, the academic establishment is only committed to symbolic change, and it will undermine any research that contests its reflexive political correctness and challenges its sacred cows. Sander and Taylor argue that university leaders and much of America's elite have become so deeply committed to an ideology of racial preferences, and so distrustful of broader American public opinion on these issues, that they have widely embraced regimes that ignore the law, hide data, and put out systematic misinformation on their own racial policies. Sander and Taylor conclude by looking at data on how to level the racial playing field in higher education. Existing studies, they argue, suggest that early childhood interventions are much more likely to produce success down the line.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780465030019 20160610
Book
xix, 348 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • The idea of mismatch and why it matters
  • A primer on affirmative action
  • The discovery of the mismatch effect
  • Law school mismatch
  • The debate on law school mismatch
  • The breadth of mismatch
  • Proposition 209 : the high road and the low road
  • The warming effect
  • Mismatch and the swelling ranks of graduates
  • The hydra of preferences : the evasion of Prop 209 at the University of California
  • Why academics avoid honest debate about affirmative action
  • Media, politics, and the accountability void
  • The Supreme Court : rewarding opacity
  • The George Mason affair
  • Transparency and the California Bar affair
  • Class, race, and the targeting of preferences
  • Closing the test score gap : better parenting and K-12 education
  • Conclusion.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xix, 348 pages ; 25 cm
  • I. Introduction. The idea of mismatch and why it matters ; A primer on affirmative action
  • II. Stirrings of mismatch. The discovery of the mismatch effect ; Law school mismatch ; The debate on law school mismatch ; The breadth of mismatch
  • III. The California experiment : what happens after a legal ban on racial preferences? Proposition 209 : the high road and the low road ; The warming effect ; Mismatch and the swelling ranks of graduates ; The hydra of preferences : the evasion of prop 209 at the University of California
  • IV. Law and ideology. Why academics avoid honest debate about affirmative action ; Media, politics, and the accountability void ; The Supreme Court : rewarding opacity ; The George Mason affair ; Transparency and the California Bar affair
  • V. The way forward. Class, race, and the targeting of preferences ; Closing the test score gap: better parenting and K-12 education ; Conclusion.
Argues that affirmative action actually harms minority students and that the movement started in the late 1960s is only a symbolic change that has become mired in posturing, concealment, and pork-barrel earmarks.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Video
1 online resource (58 minutes) Digital: data file.
On this edition of Meet the Press: Republican Senator John McCain wants to raise cigarettes more than $1 a pack to help curb teen-age smoking. Republican Senator Orrin Hatch calls the McCain legislation "pitiful." Washington's battle over big tobacco--Republican versus Republican, Hatch versus McCain; an interview with Colin Powell; roundtable discussion with Elizabeth Drew, Lisa Myers, Stuart Taylor, and Jonathan Broder.
Video
1 online resource (59 min.).
On this edition of Meet the Press: Charles Bakaly discusses the Starr Investigation; Stuart Taylor, Richard Ben-Veniste, Lanny Davis, and Paul Gigot discuss the grand jury proceedings; Yogi Berra and Cal Ripken discuss baseball and role models.
Video
1 online resource (59 min.).
On this edition of Meet the Press: India and Pakistan gain nuclear fire power, Deputy Secretary of State, Strobe Talbott analyzes how this will affect the U.S. Republican from Tennessee, Fred Thompson discusses Chinese influence on American politics. Susan McDougal defends her stand to not cooperate in Clinton case. Jane Sherburne, Stewart Taylor, Jonathan Turley, and Richard Ben-Veniste discuss ongoing allegations against President Clinton. Berry Goldwater is remembered.
Video
1 online resource (59 min.)
On this edition of Meet the Press: Bob Graham and Orrin Hatch discuss the prescription drug coverage bill put forth by the House Republicans; Francis Collins, Craig Venter, Henry Waxman, and Arthur Caplan discuss the mapping of the human genome and the ethical dilemma that will follow; insights and analysis from Bob Woodward, Al Hunt, and Stewart Taylor.
Video
1 online resource (59 min.).
Martin McGuinness discusses historic peace agreement in Northern Ireland with IRA. Steven Parrish,  Donna Shalala,  Bill Frist,  and Henry Waxman analyze the tobacco industry as smoking in youth gains momentum. John Kasich discusses social security and the future of President Bill Clinton. William Safire, David Maraniss, and Stuart Taylor provide insight and analyzes on whether or not Ken Starr will recommend impeachment for President Clinton.
Video
1 online resource (59 min.).
On this edition of Meet the Press: Senators Barney Frank and Orrin Hatch discuss President Clinton's upcoming testimony; Leon Panetta, Stuart Taylor, Lanny Davis, and Jonathan Turley discuss the legal obstacles facing the president; David Maraniss and Bob Herbert discuss how Americans view honesty in the office of the president.
Video
1 online resource (59 min.).
On this edition of Meet the Press: the attorney for three subpoenaed Secret Service agents, Michael Leibig, former Clinton White House chief of staff, Leon Panetta, Stuart Taylor of the National Journal, former White House counsel special assistant Jeff Connaughton, and law professor Jonathan Turley; insights and analysis from William Safire and Doris Kearns Goodwin.
Video
1 online resource (59 min.).
On this edition of Meet the Press: White House Council, Charles Ruff discusses President Clinton's defense in the face of Ken Starr's charges. House leaders, David Bonior and Tom DeLay discuss the possibility of impeachment. Bill McCollum and Maxine Waters discuss the current state of the presidency. Richard Ben-Veniste, Jonathan Turley, Stuart Taylor, and Lisa Meyers discuss whether or not President Clinton can make it through the current charges and possible impeachment.
Video
1 online resource (59 min.).
On this edition of Meet the Press: an interview with Monica Lewinsky's lawyer, William Ginsburg; an interview with presidential advisor, James Carville; an interview with former prosecutor, Arlen Spector, about the Clinton scandal; Cardinals John O'Connor and Bernard Law discuss Pope John Paul II's pilgrimage to Cuba; and a discussion with journalists William Safire, Michael Isikoff, Matt Drudge, and Stuart Taylor about the Clinton scandal.

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