%{search_type} search results

7 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
3 v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
  • v. 1. General report
  • v. 2. National reports
  • v. 3. [No distinctive title].
Green Library
Book
32 p. ; 22 cm.
Hoover Library
Book
xlviii, 316 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Integration through courts - Article 177 as a pre-federal device, Silvana Sciarra: community dialogues under Article 177 as a lawmaking process-- judges as legislators - testing labour law cases-- integration, interdependence and multi-level policy-making-- pre-federal and pre-constitutional labour law in inter-court co-operation-- a research project on labour law in the courts - exercises in neo-institutionalism. Gender equality - a fundamental dialogue, Clair Kilpatrick: preliminary remarks-- the active preliminary reference couple - Germany and the UK-- the languid couple - France and Denmark-- the inactive couple - Spain and Italy-- conclusions. Transfers of undertakings: preliminary remarks, Paul Davies-- the European Court of Justice in dialogue on transfers of undertakings - a fallible interlocutor?, Sylvaine Laulom-- transfers of undertakings - an experience of clashes and harmonies between community law and national legal systems, Fernando Valdes Dal-Re-- Judicial developments of EC social policy and intro-community institutional dialogues - how to define a "legal transfer", Antonio Lo Faro. Lessons from some secondary areas of dialogue: preliminary remarks, Antoine Jeammaud-- job centre - an illustrative example of strategic litigation, Silvana Sciarra-- the European Court of Justice and the Spanish labour and social security courts - two examples, Fernando Vales Dal-Re-- never on a Sunday - what has (EU) law got to do with it?, Miguel Poiares Maduro. The complexities of living with an interpretation prerogative - some observations on an imperfect dialogue, Spiros Simitis.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781841130248 20160528
The research underpinning this book was designed to support and further develop ideas already described in broader and more theoretical studies, about the dialogues happening among national courts and the ECJ as a key factor of European integration. The role played by the courts as part of the interplay of institutions within the European Union has been recognised as crucial, and this research, which was conducted at the European University Institute, homes in upon some specific examples. It deals with six Member States of the European Union: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK, analysing two select but significant areas of substantive law: transfer of undertakings and equality legislation. The analysis dwells on these key areas, although some other fields of social law were selected in order to prove the main theory underlying the whole research. While on the one hand offering a comparative assessment of developments in the six member states chosen for study, the research also highlights national peculiarities as well as the factors perceived to be driving national actors towards the preliminary ruling procedures This work will be of interest to all scholars of EU law and labour law.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781841130248 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 210 p. ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Labour Law, Public Services and Citizenship - New Domains, New Regimes?-- 2. Public Services, Citizenship and the State - the British Experience 1967-1997-- 3. Public Service, Market Ideology and Citizenship-- 4. Public Service, Public Services, Public Functions and Guarantees of the Rights of Citizens: Unchanging Needs in a Changed Context-- 5. Citizenship, Fundamental Rights and Public Services-- 6. The Liberalization and Privatization of Public Utilities and the Protection of Users' Rights: the Perspective of Economic Theory-- 7. Universal Service Obligations and the Emergence of Citizens' Rights in European Telecommunications Liberalization-- 8. Citizenship and Public Services - Some Concluding Comments-- 9. Employment, Citizenship, the Services of General Public Interest-- 10. Labour Law - a Bridge between Public Services and Citizenship Rights.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198265757 20160528
The operation of public services at both domestic and European levels is becoming a subject of considerable interest to researchers and policy makers alike. This book examines the economic and political implications of public services alongside a detailed analysis of their legal impact. Through this analysis, a new concept of constitutional citizenship is identified; a concept which would give consumers, as well as employees, new rights. The book also examines the new doctrine of services of general economic interest, as enshrined in the Amsterdam Treaty, and the impact it will have on public services. The privatization of public services and the resulting impact on consumers is also dealt with.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198265757 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 200 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction / Bob Hepple, Rochelle le Roux and Silvana Sciarra
  • The freedom to strike and its rationale / Bob Hepple
  • The international and regional framework / Tonia Novitz
  • Constitutionalising the right to strike / Halton Cheadle
  • Representativeness and the legitimacy of bargaining agents / Luisa Corazza and Emma Fergus
  • The role of trade unions in strikes / Alan Rycroft
  • Limitations of the right to strike in the public sector and essential services / Tamara Cohen and Rochelle le Roux
  • Political strikes / Giovanni Orlandini
  • Running the gauntlet : understanding policing responses and strategies to strike violence / Julie Berg and Simon Howell
  • Heritage and adjustment : some concluding remarks / Silvana Sciarra.
The Marikana massacre at a platinum mine in South Africa on 16 August 2012 reflected a deep social crisis in post-apartheid South Africa, but also marked a failure of voluntary collective bargaining. Against the backdrop of Marikana and other violent protest action in "South Africa, Laws Against Strikes examines what went wrong with labour relations in South Africa and what can be done to stabilise and improve those relations. In the European Union, the right to strike has been at the centre of the complex and controversial jurisprudence of the Court of Justice regarding industrial action, which started with the rulings in Viking and Laval in 2007. Although violence was not a factor in those cases, they brought into public focus the problem of disequilibrium between economic freedoms and fundamental social rights. Since 2008, the era of austerity measures in Europe has also called into question the adequacy of labour laws and has revealed that organisations representing collective interests lack the power to significantly influence macro-economic policy. Laws Against Strikes, comprising contributions from South African, Italian and British legal scholars, examines the right to strike in periods of socio-economic crisis. The book aims to contribute to the debates on this issue, by comparing, where appropriate, the operation of the right to strike in South Africa with its operation in the European Union countries."--Page 4 of book cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 200 pages ; 23 cm.
  • The freedom to strike and its rationale / Bob Hepple
  • The international and regional framework / Tonia Novitz
  • Constitutionalising the right to strike / Halton Cheadle
  • Representativeness and the legitimacy of bargaining agents / Luisa Corazza and Emma Fergus
  • The role of trade unions in strikes / Alan Rycroft
  • Limitations of the right to strike in the public sector and essential services / Tamara Cohen and Rochelle le Roux
  • Political strikes / Giovanni Orlandini
  • Running the gauntlet : understanding policing responses and strategies to strike violence / Julie Berg and Simon Howell
  • Heritage and adjustment : some concluding remarks / Silvana Sciarra.
"The Marikana massacre at a platinum mine in South Africa on 16 August 2012 reflected a deep social crisis in post-apartheid South Africa, but also marked a failure of voluntary collective bargaining. Against the backdrop of Marikana and other violent protest action in "South Africa, Laws Against Strikes examines what went wrong with labour relations in South Africa and what can be done to stabilise and improve those relations. In the European Union, the right to strike has been at the centre of the complex and controversial jurisprudence of the Court of Justice regarding industrial action, which started with the rulings in Viking and Laval in 2007. Although violence was not a factor in those cases, they brought into public focus the problem of disequilibrium between economic freedoms and fundamental social rights. Since 2008, the era of austerity measures in Europe has also called into question the adequacy of labour laws and has revealed that organisations representing collective interests lack the power to significantly influence macro-economic policy. Laws Against Strikes, comprising contributions from South African, Italian and British legal scholars, examines the right to strike in periods of socio-economic crisis. The book aims to contribute to the debates on this issue, by comparing, where appropriate, the operation of the right to strike in South Africa with its operation in the European Union countries."-- Back cover.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xviii, 368 p. ; 24 cm.
  • List of figures and tables-- Preface-- List of abbreviations-- Notes on contributors-- Part I: 1. New discourses in labour law: part-time work and the paradigm of flexibility Silvana Sciarra-- 2. The European employment strategy and the regulation of part-time work Diamond Ashiagbor-- 3. The role of EU employment law and policy in the de-marginalisation of part-time work: a study in the interaction between EU regulation and member state regulation Paul Davies and Mark Freedland-- Part II: 4. France: no longer an employment policy tool Sylvaine Laulom-- 5. Germany: a bone of contention Maximilian Fuchs-- 6. Italy: adaptable employment and private autonomy in the Italian part-time reform Antonio Lo Faro-- 7. The Netherlands: from atypicality to typicality Jelle Visser, Ton Wilthagen, Ronald Beltzer and Esther Van Der Putte-- 8. Spain: the difficulty of marrying flexibility with security Fernando Valdes Dal-Re-- 9. Sweden: welfare or unfair? Ronnie Eklund-- 10. The United Kingdom: how is EU governance transformative? Claire Kilpatrick and Mark Freedland.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521840026 20160528
This book originates from the research project 'New discourses in labour law' held at the European University Institute. A detailed analysis of part-time work regulation is presented for seven European countries, in order to ascertain how internal domestic choices of the legislatures have merged into the 'Open method of co-ordination'. The impact of European employment policies is considered in parallel with the implementation of the Directive on part-time work, thus providing a complete overview of both soft and hard law mechanisms available to national policy-makers. In this original work, the inter-action between law and policy emerges as a dynamic and constantly changing process of exchange between national and supranational actors, through the use of concrete examples of law-making. Labour law is put forward as being central in the current evolution of European law, and this centrality is presented as a confirmation of innovation and continuity in regulatory techniques.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521840026 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

Articles+

Journal articles, e-books, & other e-resources
Articles+ results include