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Book
36 pages
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
iii, 78 page ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
viii, 122 p. : ill. (some col.)
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
Book
214 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
iii, 88 p. : ill. ; 24 cm
  • Promoting global internet freedom
  • New technologies, innovative repression: growing threats to internet freedom.
Green Library
Book
xvii, 301 p.
'Chris Marsden maneuvers through the hype articulated by Netwrok Neutrality advocates and opponents. He offers a clear-headed analysis of the high stakes in this debate about the Internet's future, and fearlessly refutes the misinformation and misconceptions that about' Professor Rob Freiden, Penn State University Net Neutrality is a very heated and contested policy principle regarding access for content providers to the Internet end-user, and potential discrimination in that access where the end-user's ISP (or another ISP) blocks that access in part or whole. The suggestion has been that the problem can be resolved by either introducing greater competition, or closely policing conditions for vertically integrated service, such as VOIP. However, that is not the whole story, and ISPs as a whole have incentives to discriminate between content for matters such as network management of spam, to secure and maintain customer experience at current levels, and for economic benefit from new Quality of Service standards. This includes offering a 'priority lane' on the network for premium content types such as video and voice service. The author considers market developments and policy responses in Europe and the United States, draws conclusions and proposes regulatory recommendations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781849663571 20160605
Book
viii, 122 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Opening remarks / Jörg Eberspächer
  • ICT for the poor at large scale : innovative connections to markets and services / Joachim von Braun
  • People driven innovation : how to create the demand for ICT solutions in underserved areas / Kazi Islam
  • Transfer of services to emerging markets : mobile services, m-payment & m-health / Stanley Chia
  • Incubating micro enterprises in rural South Africa : the use case of virtual buying cooperatives / Christian Merz
  • "What can we learn from the developing world?" : impact of mobile applications from developing markets on mature economies / Gary Marsden
  • Mobile broadband community centers / Jean-Marc Cannet
  • Myths about ICT for the other billions / Kentaro Toyama
  • From voice to broadband data : affordable communications in emerging markets / Frank Oehler
  • Leapfrogging ICT with cloud computing in emerging countries / Hagen Wenzek
  • Panel discussion: ICT and economics development in underserved markets : a chicken and egg problem / chair, Arnold Picot ; participants, Anriette Esterhuysen ... [et al.]
  • Closing remarks / Arnold Picot.
Currently, around one to two billion users are able to connect to the Internet, most of them living in the industrialized parts of the world. However, if we want to improve the quality of life of the world population with the help of access to information and education, it is necessary that in the next decade an additional five billion people gain access to the Internet. The next five billion Internet users are mainly living in emerging economies. Therefore, the main challenge is to lower the economic barrier using new approaches for infrastructure deployment and service delivery to billions of people. This book reflects the discussions of the challenges from the Munchner Kreis with representatives from the ICT industry, academia, non-governmental organizations and governmental development organizations, among them many representatives from emerging economies in Africa and Asia. They had highlighted the real demand for ICT, and what impact ICT creates for the wealth and lifestyle of the people.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783642122248 20160605
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (503 pages) : digital, PDF file(s).
  • 1. What makes CDMA work for my cell phone?-- 2. How does Google sell ad space?-- 3. How does Google rank webpages?-- 4. How does Netflix recommend movies?-- 5. When can I trust product ratings on Amazon?-- 6. Why does Wikipedia even work?-- 7. How do I viralize a YouTube video and tip a Groupon deal?-- 8. How do I influence people on Facebook and Twitter?-- 9. Can I really reach anyone in 6 steps?-- 10. Does the Internet have an Achilles' heel?-- 11. Why do AT&T and Verizon Wireless charge me $10 a GB?-- 12. How can I pay less for my Internet connection?-- 13. How does traffic get through the Internet?-- 14. Why doesn't the Internet collapse under congestion?-- 15. How can Skype and BitTorrent be free?-- 16. What's inside the cloud of iCloud?-- 17. Netflix, iTunes, IPTV: which way to watch video?-- 18. Why is WiFi faster at home than at a hotspot?-- 19. Why am I only getting a few percent of advertised 4G speed?-- 20. Is it fair that my neighbour's iPhone downloads faster?
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107024946 20160618
How does Google sell ad space and rank webpages? How does Netflix recommend movies and Amazon rank products? How can you influence people on Facebook and Twitter and can you really reach anyone in six steps? Why doesn't the Internet collapse under congestion and does it have an Achilles' heel? Why are you charged per gigabyte for mobile data and how can Skype and BitTorrent be free? How are cloud services so scalable and why is WiFi slower at hotspots than at home? Driven by twenty real-world questions about our networked lives, this book explores the technology behind the multi-trillion dollar Internet and wireless industries. Providing easily understandable answers for the casually curious, alongside detailed explanations for those looking for in-depth discussion, this thought-provoking book is essential reading for students in engineering, science and economics, for network industry professionals and anyone curious about how technological and social networks really work.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107024946 20160618
Book
xi, 345 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction / Jonathan Lazar and Michael Ashley Stein
  • Standards bodies, access to information technology, and human rights / Judy Brewer
  • Accessible ICTs and the opening of political space for persons with disabilities / Janet E. Lord
  • Web accessibility for people with cognitive disabilities : a legal right? / Peter Blanck
  • Intersection of human rights, social justice, the internet, and accessibility in libraries : access, education, and inclusion / Paul T. Jaeger, Brian Wentz, and John Carlo Bertot
  • Public financing of information technology and human rights for people with disabilities / Deborah Kaplan
  • Using provincial laws to drive a national agenda : connecting human rights and disability rights laws / Ravi Malhotra and Megan A. Rusciano
  • Access to justice / Fredric I. Lederer
  • Open government and digital accessibility / Timothy Elder
  • E-books and human rights / Jim Fruchterman
  • Accessibility and online learning / Mary J. Ziegler and David Sloan
  • Who owns captioning? / Raja Kushalnagar
  • Information privacy and security as a human right for people with disabilities / Jonathan Lazar, Brian Wentz, and Marco Winckler
  • How does inaccessible gaming lead to social exclusion? / Joyram Chakraborty
  • Pivot model of policy entrepreneurship : an application of European ideas in the global South / G. Anthony Giannoumis, Mirriam Nthenge, and Jorge Manhique
  • Accessibility infrastructure and the global South / Joyojeet Pal
  • ICT access, disability human rights, and social inclusion in India / Sanjay S. Jain.
Disability, Human Rights, and Information Technology addresses the global issue of equal access to information and communications technology (ICT) by persons with disabilities. The right to access the same digital content at the same time and at the same cost as people without disabilities is implicit in several human rights instruments and is featured prominently in Articles 9 and 21 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The right to access ICT, moreover, invokes complementary civil and human rights issues: freedom of expression; freedom to information; political participation; civic engagement; inclusive education; the right to access the highest level of scientific and technological information; and participation in social and cultural opportunities. Despite the ready availability and minimal cost of technology to enable people with disabilities to access ICT on an equal footing as consumers without disabilities, prevailing practice around the globe continues to result in their exclusion. Questions and complexities may also arise where technologies advance ahead of existing laws and policies, where legal norms are established but not yet implemented, or where legal rights are defined but clear technical implementations are not yet established. At the intersection of human-computer interaction, disability rights, civil rights, human rights, international development, and public policy, the volume's contributors examine crucial yet underexplored areas, including technology access for people with cognitive impairments, public financing of information technology, accessibility and e-learning, and human rights and social inclusion. Contributors: John Bertot, Peter Blanck, Judy Brewer, Joyram Chakraborty, Tim Elder, Jim Fruchterman, G. Anthony Giannoumis, Paul Jaeger, Sanjay Jain, Deborah Kaplan, Raja Kushalnagar, Jonathan Lazar, Fredric I. Lederer, Janet E. Lord, Ravi Malhotra, Jorge Manhique, Mirriam Nthenge, Joyojeet Pal, Megan A. Rusciano, David Sloan, Michael Ashley Stein, Brian Wentz, Marco Winckler, Mary J. Ziegler.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249231 20170717
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 345 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Standards bodies, access to information technology, and human rights / Judy Brewer
  • Accessible ICTs and the opening of political space for persons with disabilities / Janet E. Lord
  • Web accessibility for people with cognitive disabilities : a legal right? / Peter Blanck
  • Intersection of human rights, social justice, the internet, and accessibility in libraries : access, education, and inclusion / Paul T. Jaeger, Brian Wentz, and John Carlo Bertot
  • Public financing of information technology and human rights for people with disabilities / Deborah Kaplan
  • Using provincial laws to drive a national agenda : connecting human rights and disability rights laws / Ravi Malhotra and Megan A. Rusciano
  • Access to justice / Fredric I. Lederer
  • Open government and digital accessibility / Timothy Elder
  • E-books and human rights / Jim Fruchterman
  • Accessibility and online learning / Mary J. Ziegler and David Sloan
  • Who owns captioning? / Raja Kushalnagar
  • Information privacy and security as a human right for people with disabilities / Jonathan Lazar, Brian Wentz, and Marco Winckler
  • How does inaccessible gaming lead to social exclusion? / Joyram Chakraborty
  • Pivot model of policy entrepreneurship : an application of European ideas in the global South / G. Anthony Giannoumis, Mirriam Nthenge, and Jorge Manhique
  • Accessibility infrastructure and the global South / Joyojeet Pal
  • ICT access, disability human rights, and social inclusion in India / Sanjay S. Jain.
Disability, Human Rights, and Information Technology addresses the global issue of equal access to information and communications technology (ICT) by persons with disabilities. The right to access the same digital content at the same time and at the same cost as people without disabilities is implicit in several human rights instruments and is featured prominently in Articles 9 and 21 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The right to access ICT, moreover, invokes complementary civil and human rights issues: freedom of expression; freedom to information; political participation; civic engagement; inclusive education; the right to access the highest level of scientific and technological information; and participation in social and cultural opportunities. Despite the ready availability and minimal cost of technology to enable people with disabilities to access ICT on an equal footing as consumers without disabilities, prevailing practice around the globe continues to result in their exclusion. Questions and complexities may also arise where technologies advance ahead of existing laws and policies, where legal norms are established but not yet implemented, or where legal rights are defined but clear technical implementations are not yet established. At the intersection of human-computer interaction, disability rights, civil rights, human rights, international development, and public policy, the volume's contributors examine crucial yet underexplored areas, including technology access for people with cognitive impairments, public financing of information technology, accessibility and e-learning, and human rights and social inclusion. Contributors: John Bertot, Peter Blanck, Judy Brewer, Joyram Chakraborty, Tim Elder, Jim Fruchterman, G. Anthony Giannoumis, Paul Jaeger, Sanjay Jain, Deborah Kaplan, Raja Kushalnagar, Jonathan Lazar, Fredric I. Lederer, Janet E. Lord, Ravi Malhotra, Jorge Manhique, Mirriam Nthenge, Joyojeet Pal, Megan A. Rusciano, David Sloan, Michael Ashley Stein, Brian Wentz, Marco Winckler, Mary J. Ziegler.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249231 20170717
Green Library

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