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Book
340 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
  • Spring 1915-the legacy
  • "A flash of lightning from the north"
  • "Humanising war"
  • "The law of facts"
  • "A scrap of paper"
  • "The worst of contrabands"
  • "England will burn"
  • "A most effective weapon"
  • "Something that makes people permanently incapable of fighting"
  • "Operation Disinfection"
  • "This filthy loathsome pestilence"
  • "Solomon's Temple"
  • "They got us this time, all right"
  • "Wilful and wholesale murder"
  • "Too proud to fight"
  • "The very earth shook"
  • "Order, counter-order, disorder!"
  • "A gift of love"
  • "Do you know anything about gas?"
  • "Zepp and a portion of clouds"
  • "Remember the Lusitania"
  • "Each one must fight on to the end"
  • "Weapons of mass destruction"
  • Appendix. The Lusitania controversies.
"In six weeks during April and May 1915, as World War I escalated, Germany forever altered the way war would be fought with poison gas, torpedoes killing civilians, and aerial bombardment. Each of these actions violated rules of war carefully agreed at the Hague Conventions of 1898 and 1907. The era of weapons of mass destruction had dawned. While each of these momentous events has been chronicled in histories of the war, historian Diana Preston links them for the first time, revealing the dramatic stories behind each through the eyes of those who were there, whether making the decisions or experiencing their effect"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
vii, 307 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
An account of the mid-nineteenth-century war in Afghanistan documents how the British government sought to protect regional interests by attempting to install a puppet ruler only to be defeated by united Afghanistan tribes.
Green Library
Book
317 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), map ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
354 p., [10] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), map ; 23 cm.
In 1631, the heartbroken Moghul Emperor, Shah Jahan, ordered the construction of a monument of unsurpassed splendour and majesty in memory of his beloved wife. Theirs was an extraordinary story of passionate love: although almost constantly pregnant - she bore him fourteen children - Mumtaz Mahal followed her husband on every military campaign, in order that they might never be apart. But then Mumtaz died in childbirth. Blinded by grief, Shah Jahan created an exquisite and extravagant memorial for her on the banks of the river Jumna. A gleaming mausoleum of flawless symmetry, the Taj Mahal was built from milk-white marble and rose sandstone, and studded with a fortune in precious jewels. It took twenty years to complete and involved over 20,000 labourers, depleting the Moghul treasuries. But Shah Jahan was to pay a greater price for his obsession. He ended his days imprisoned by his own son in Agra Fort, gazing across the river at the monument to his love. The building of the Taj Mahal had set brother against brother and son against father in a savage conflict that pushed the seventeenth century's most powerful empire into irreversible decline. The story behind the Taj Mahal has the cadences of Greek tragedy, the carnage of a Jacobean revenge play and the ripe emotion of grand opera. With the storytelling skills that characterize their previous books, in this compelling narrative history Diana and Michael Preston succeed in putting a revealing human face on the famous marble masterpiece.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780385609470 20160528
Green Library
Book
x, 438 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
'Is there a point beyond which the scientist cannot go under any circumstances?' - Heisenberg's uncertainty about nuclear progress. 'I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds' - Oppenheimer quoting the Bhagavad Gita after witnessing the successful demonstration of the atom bomb. The bomb which killed an estimated 140,000 (tbc) civilians in Hiroshima and destroyed the countryside for miles around, was one of the defining moments in world history, if not the defining moment of the twentieth century. That mushroom cloud cast a terrifying shadow over the contemporary world and continues to do so today. But how could this have happened? What led to the creation of a weapon of mass destruction on an unprecedented other-worldly scale? From the moment scientists contemplated the destructive potential of splitting the atom the role of science changed. Ethical and moral dilemmas faced all of those who realised the implications of their research and those who decided to use and advance it. BEFORE THE FALL-OUT charts the chain of events from Marie Curie's scientific breakthrough through the many colourful characters such as Einstein, Robert Oppenheimer, and Lord Rutherford whose discoveries contributed to the bomb. Many of the international scientists who had collaborated and developed close friendships in the early years of the century would find themselves on opposite sides of a world war with loyalties and motivations called into question. The fate of Jewish scientists in the field also hung in the balance with colleagues taking huge risks to rescue and find them positions abroad. In war-time, the arms race became a matter of covert undercover operations, the British Maud Committee competing with the German Uranium Club and even the American Manhattan Project. A complicated ballet of Anglo-American relations moved from co-operation to hostility, secrecy and independence. The story of the atomic bomb spans 50 years of prolific scientific innovation, turbulent politics, foreign affairs and world-changing history. Through personal stories of exile, indecision and soul-searching, to charges of collaboration, spying and deceit, Diana Preston presents the human side of an unstoppable programme with a lethal outcome.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780385604383 20160528
Green Library
Book
ix, 372 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • In 1676, William Dampier started his career as a buccaneer preying on ships on the Spanish Main and struggling through the impenetrable jungle of the Isthmus of Panama in search of gold. He could easily have ended up on the gallows. Poor and obscure yet determined to sail the world and to make his fortune, he was to become the first person to circumnavigate the globe three times. He had a uniquely questing and, in Coleridge's words, 'exquisite' mind, and recorded with passion and dedication all that he discovered about the new world around him. Among his many extraordinary and pioneering achievements, Dampier mapped the winds and the currents of the world's oceans for the first time. He landed in Australia eighty years before Cook and brought back the first scientific specimens. He inspired Darwin a hundred and fifty years later with his notes on the wildlife of the Galapagos Islands and elsewhere. He wrote the first bestselling travel books, which influenced Defoe's Robinson Crusoe and Swift's Gulliver's Travels, and enriched the English language with many new words, from 'barbecue', 'avocado' and 'chopsticks' to 'sub-species'. A curious man in a curious age, once courted by Samuel Pepys as John Evelyn but now all but forgotten in his native country, William Dampier combined a swashbuckling life of adventure with pioneering scientific achievements. In A Pirate Of Exquisite Mind, Diana and Michael Preston reveal, in a compelling narrative, the story of a uniquely English hero.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780385607056 20160528
In 1676, William Dampier started his career as a buccaneer preying on ships on the Spanish Main and struggling through the impenetrable jungle of the Isthmus of Panama in search of gold. He could easily have ended up on the gallows. Poor and obscure yet determined to sail the world and to make his fortune, he was to become the first person to circumnavigate the globe three times. He had a uniquely questing and, in Coleridge's words, 'exquisite' mind, and recorded with passion and dedication all that he discovered about the new world around him. Among his many extraordinary and pioneering achievements, Dampier mapped the winds and the currents of the world's oceans for the first time. He landed in Australia eighty years before Cook and brought back the first scientific specimens. He inspired Darwin a hundred and fifty years later with his notes on the wildlife of the Galapagos Islands and elsewhere. He wrote the first bestselling travel books, which influenced Defoe's ROBINSON CRUSOE and Swift's GULLIVER'S TRAVELS, and enriched the English language with many new words, from 'barbecue', 'avocado' and 'chopsticks' to 'sub-species'. A curious man in a curious age, once courted by Samue.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780385607056 20160528
Green Library
Book
xi, 532 p., [32] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
This work relates the story of the sinking of the Lusitania on May 7th, 1915. On board were some world-famous figures, including multimillionare Alfred Vanderbilt. But this wasn't the Titanic and there was no iceberg; the Lusitania was torpedoed by a German U-boat. Here, Preston looks at the events in their full historical context, placing the human dimension at the heart of her exploration. Using first-hand accounts of the tragedy she brings characters to life, recreating the splendour of the liner as it set sail and the horror of its final moments. Using British, American and German research material Preston answers many of the unanswered and controversial questions surrounding the Lusitania: Why didn't Cunard listen to warnings that the ship would be a target of the Germans? Was the Lusitania sacrificed to bring the Americans into the War? What was really in the Lusitania's hold? Was she armed? Had Cunard's offices been infiltrated by German agents? And did the Kaiser's decision to cease unrestricted U-boat warfare in response to international outrage expressed after the sinking effectively change the outcome of World War I? This book casts light on these questions surrounding one of the world's most famous maritime disasters.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780385601733 20160528
Green Library
Book
322 p., [24] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
The 1900 Boxer Rebellion in China culminated in the siege of the eleven Foreign Legations in Peking, their relief by an international force sent up from Tientsin and the subsequent looting of the Forbidden City in Peking.'.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780094793903 20160528
Green Library
Book
254 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Published to coincide with the 250th anniversary of the Battle of Culloden, an account of the life of Bonnie Prince Charlie, of his childhood and upbringing, his claim to the throne he thought was rightfully his, of the Battle of Culloden and of his escape to the Highlands. First published in 1995 and now available in paperback.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780094740808 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Video
1 videodisc (85 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
On May 7, 1915, the passenger ship Lusitania was en route to England from New York City when a torpedo from a German U-boat sent the luxury liner and more than 1,000 passengers to an icy grave. The sinking of this great ocean liner shocked the world and "Avenge the Lusitania!" was the rallying cry that lured many young American men to enlist during World War I. In this dramatic special, Discovery Channel brings you the story of the doomed ship and, for the first time, goes inside the cramped, foul-smelling hull of the U-boat that fired the fateful torpedo.
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