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Book
66 p.
Media & Microtext Center
Book
151 p. ; 24 cm.
The first translation into English of this commentary, Philoponus explains Aristotle's account of place to elementary students.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xii, 127 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
1 online resource (143 pages).
  • Preface Richard Sorabji Translator's Note Translation Notes Bibliography English-Greek Glossary Greek-English Index Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780715640883 20160606
Philoponus' commentary on the last part of Aristotle's Physics Book 4 does not offer major alternatives to Aristotle's science, as did his commentary on the earlier parts, concerning place, vacuum and motion in a vacuum. Aristotle's subject here is time, and his treatment of it had led to controversy in earlier writers. Philoponus does offer novelties when he treats motion round a bend as in one sense faster than motion on the straight over the same distance in the same time, because of the need to consider the greater effort involved. And he points out that in an earlier commentary on Book 8 he had argued against Aristotle for the possibility of a last instant of time. This volume contains an English translation of Philoponus' commentary, as well as a detailed introduction, extensive explanatory notes and a bibliography.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780715640883 20160606
Book
185 p. ; 24 cm.
In the chapters discussed in this section of "Philoponus' Physics commentary" Aristotle explores a range of questions about the basic structure of reality, the nature of prime matter, the principles of change, the relation between form and matter, and the issue of whether things can come into being out of nothing, and if so, in what sense that is true. Philoponus' commentaries do not merely report and explain Aristotle and the other thinkers whom Aristotle is discussing. They are also the philosophical work of an independent thinker in the Neoplatonic tradition. Philoponus has his own, occasionally idiosyncratic, views on a number of important issues, and he sometimes disagrees with other teachers whose views he has encountered perhaps in written texts, and sometimes in oral delivery. A number of distinctive passages of philosophical importance occur in this part of Book 1, in which we see Philoponus at work on issues in physics and cosmology, as well as logic and metaphysics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780715637876 20160610
Philosophy Library (Tanner)
Book
338 p. ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xix, 300 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 194 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Aristotle on the principles of change in Physics I-- 2. Transmutation of the Elements in De Generatione et Corruptione 1.1-4-- 3. Aristotle's Theory of Matter-- 4. Aristotle on Teleology in Nature-- 5. Aristotle's Theory of Form-- 6. Aristotle on the Eleatics in Physics I, 2-3-- 7. Aristotle, Zeno, and the Potential Infinite-- 8. Note on Aristotle's Account of Place-- 9. Aristotle's Account of Time-- 10. Aristotle on Continuity in Physics VI.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199286867 20160528
Space, Time, Matter, and Form collects ten of David Bostock's essays on themes from Aristotle's Physics, four of them published here for the first time. The first five papers look at issues raised in the first two books of the Physics, centred on notions of matter and form, and the idea of substance as what persists through change. They also range over other of Aristotle's scientific works, such as his biology and psychology and the account of change in his De Generatione et Corruptione. The volume's remaining essays examine themes in later books of the Physics, including infinity, place, time, and continuity. Bostock argues that Aristotle's views on these topics are of real interest in their own right, independent of his notions of substance, form, and matter; they also raise some pressing problems of interpretation, which these essays seek to resolve.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199286867 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xxxi, 308 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
3 v. ; 23 cm.
  • t. 1. Introduction
  • t. 2. Quaestiones (L. I-L. IIII)
  • t. 3. Quaestiones (L. IV-L. VIII).
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
[20], 108 p. : ill.
Media & Microtext Center
Book
362 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
[4], 262, [2] pages : illustrations (woodcuts) ; 32 cm (fol.)
Medical Library (Lane)
Book
220, [12] p.
Media & Microtext Center
Book
235 p. : 3 ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiii, 224 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Part 1 Background to the Solvay councils: preface - when physicists held a "witches' sabbath", I. Stengers-- Ernest Solvay -the system, the law and the council, D. Devriese and G. Wallenborn-- Rutherford, the Cavendish laboratory and the Solvay congresses, J. Hughes-- Paul Langevin and the French scientists at the Solvay conferences, B. Bensaude-Vincent-- the Solvay councils and the Nobel institution, E. Crawford-- the organization of science in the 19th century, G. Vanpaemel-- physics prior to the first council, P. Marage and G. Wallenborn. Part 2 The birth of modern physics: the first Solvay council-- 1913-1921 - from the second to the third council-- 1927 - the fifth council-- the debate between Einstein and Bohr, or how to interpret quantum mechanics-- 1933 - the seventh council-- a new era.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783764357054 20160528
The Solvay Councils, called since 1911 by Belgian industrialist Ernest Solvay have had a major impact on the birth and development of modern physics, especially quantum and nuclear physics. This text tells the story of the Councils through the presentation of reports and debates.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783764357054 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 736 p. 29 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

18. Fisica : libro III [2012]

Book
188 p. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

19. Physics [1996]

Book
lxxx, 301 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
For many centuries, Aristotle's Physics was the essential starting point for anyone who wished to study the natural sciences This book begins with an analysis of change, which introduces us to Aristotle's central concepts of matter and form, before moving on to an account of explanation in the sciences and a defence of teleological explanation. Aristotle then turns to detailed, important, and often ingenious discussions of notions such as infinity, place, void, time, and conintuity. He ends with an argument designed to show that the changes we experience in the world demand as their cause a single unchanging cause of all change, namely God. This is the first complete translation of Physics into English since 1930. It presents Aristotle's thought accurately, while at the same time simplifying and expanding the often crabbed and elliptical style of the original, so that it is very much easier to read. A lucid introduction and extensive notes explain the general structure of each section of the book and shed light on particular problems. This book is intended for students of Classics, Ancient Philosophy, History of Science, Philosophy of Science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780192823106 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xi, 260 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)

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