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Book
x, 269 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction Chapter 1. Battling the Veil: American Reactions to the Iranian Revolution Chapter 2. Muslim Women in U.S. Public Discourse After 1979 Chapter 3. Sisterhood Is Global: Transnational Feminism and Islam Chapter 4. The First Gulf War and Saudi "Gender Apartheid" Chapter 5. Female Genital Mutilation and U.S. Policy in the 1990s Chapter 6. The Taliban, Feminist Activism, and the Clinton Administration Chapter 7. Muslim Women's Human Rights and U.S. Foreign Policy Since 9/11 Notes Index Acknowledgments.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249675 20180213
Americans' concerns about women's human rights in Muslim countries were triggered by the Iranian Revolution of 1979 and have evolved within the context of long-standing Western stereotypes about Muslims, as well as transnational feminism and the global human rights movement. As these frameworks simultaneously competed against and reinforced one another, U.S. public conversations about Muslim women intensified, culminating in feminist campaigns and U.S. policies that aimed to defend women's rights in Islamic countries-such was the case with the Clinton administration's decision not to recognize the Taliban regime after they seized control of Afghanistan in 1996. U.S. Foreign Policy and Muslim Women's Human Rights provides a fresh interpretation of U.S. relations with the Muslim world and, more broadly, U.S. foreign relations history and the history of human rights. Kelly J. Shannon argues that, as U.S. attention to the Middle East and other Muslim-majority regions became more focused and sustained, the issue of women's human rights in Islamic societies was one that Americans gradually identified as vitally important to U.S. foreign policy. Based on an analysis of a wide range of sources-including U.S. government and United Nations documents, oral histories, NGO archival records, news media, scholarship, films and television, and novels-and a wide range of actors including journalists, academics, activists, NGOs, the public, Muslim women, Islamic fundamentalists, and U.S. policymakers-the book challenges traditional interpretations of U.S. foreign policy that assert the primacy of "hard power" concerns in U.S. decision making. By reframing U.S.-Islamic relations with respect to women's rights, and revealing faulty assumptions about the drivers of U.S. foreign policy, Shannon sheds new light on U.S. identity and policy creation and alters the standard narratives of the U.S. relationship with the Muslim world in the closing years of the Cold War and the emergence of the post-Cold War era.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249675 20180213
Green Library
Book
x, 269 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Battling the Veil: American Reactions to the Iranian Revolution
  • 2. Muslim Women in U.S. Public Discourse After 1979
  • 3. Sisterhood Is Global: Transnational Feminism and Islam
  • 4. The First Gulf War and Saudi "Gender Apartheid"
  • 5. Female Genital Mutilation and U.S. Policy in the 1990s
  • 6. The Taliban, Feminist Activism, and the Clinton Administration
  • 7. Muslim Women's Human Rights and U.S. Foreign Policy Since 9/11.
Americans' concerns about women's human rights in Muslim countries were triggered by the Iranian Revolution of 1979 and have evolved within the context of long-standing Western stereotypes about Muslims, as well as transnational feminism and the global human rights movement. As these frameworks simultaneously competed against and reinforced one another, U.S. public conversations about Muslim women intensified, culminating in feminist campaigns and U.S. policies that aimed to defend women's rights in Islamic countries-such was the case with the Clinton administration's decision not to recognize the Taliban regime after they seized control of Afghanistan in 1996. U.S. Foreign Policy and Muslim Women's Human Rights provides a fresh interpretation of U.S. relations with the Muslim world and, more broadly, U.S. foreign relations history and the history of human rights. Kelly J. Shannon argues that, as U.S. attention to the Middle East and other Muslim-majority regions became more focused and sustained, the issue of women's human rights in Islamic societies was one that Americans gradually identified as vitally important to U.S. foreign policy. Based on an analysis of a wide range of sources-including U.S. government and United Nations documents, oral histories, NGO archival records, news media, scholarship, films and television, and novels-and a wide range of actors including journalists, academics, activists, NGOs, the public, Muslim women, Islamic fundamentalists, and U.S. policymakers-the book challenges traditional interpretations of U.S. foreign policy that assert the primacy of "hard power" concerns in U.S. decision making. By reframing U.S.-Islamic relations with respect to women's rights, and revealing faulty assumptions about the drivers of U.S. foreign policy, Shannon sheds new light on U.S. identity and policy creation and alters the standard narratives of the U.S. relationship with the Muslim world in the closing years of the Cold War and the emergence of the post-Cold War era.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249675 20180213
Law Library (Crown)
Book
222 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
In the past decade, debates over immigrant rights and family rights, and accompanying concerns over birthright citizenship, have taken center stage in popular media and mainstream political debates. These debates, however, frequently overlook the role of the public child welfare system in the United States-the agency charged with protecting children and maintaining the integrity of families. Based on research conducted in the San Diego-Tijuana region between 2008 and 2012, Fragile Families tells the stories of children, parents, social workers, and legal actors enmeshed in the child welfare system, and sheds light on the particular challenges faced by the children of detained and deported non-U.S. citizen parents who are simultaneously caught up in the immigration system in this border region. Many families come into contact with child welfare services because of the precariousness of their lives-unsafe housing, unstable employment, and the conditions of violence, drug use, and domestic violence made visible by the heightened police presence in impoverished communities. Naomi Glenn-Levin Rodriguez examines the character of child welfare decision-making processes and how discretionary decisions constitute the central avenue through which race, citizenship, and other cultural processes inflect child welfare practice in a manner that disproportionately impacts Latina/o families-both undocumented and U.S. citizens. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork to look at how immigration enforcement and child welfare play central roles in the ongoing production of citizenship, race, and national belonging, Fragile Families focuses on the everyday experiences of Latina/o families whose lives are shaped at the nexus of child welfare services and immigration enforcement.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249385 20170911
Green Library
Book
ix, 209 pages ; 23 cm.
  • The United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide
  • The evil in genocide
  • Genocide and comparative evil : counting victims, numbers, degrees
  • Disputing "genocide" : issues of uniqueness and group-identity
  • The pushback and its search for a replacement
  • "Genocide" and "holocaust" : language as history
  • Raphael Lemkin, unsung hero : reparation
  • From genocide to group-rights
  • Arendt on the evil in genocide : banality's depths
  • Genocide-denial.
The term "genocide"-"group killing"-which first appeared in Raphael Lemkin's 1944 book, Axis Rule in Occupied Europe, had by 1948 established itself in international law through the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. Since then the charge of genocide has been both widely applied but also contested. In Genocide: The Act as Idea, Berel Lang examines and illuminates the concept of genocide, at once articulating difficulties in its definition and proposing solutions to them. In his analysis, Lang explores the relation of genocide to group identity, individual and corporate moral responsibility, the concept of individual and group intentions, and the concept of evil more generally. The idea of genocide, Lang argues, represents a notable advance in the history of political and ethical thought which proposed alternatives to it, like "crimes against humanity, " fail to take into account.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812248852 20170306
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (337 pages).
Directed at a diverse audience of students, legal and public health practitioners, and anyone interested in understanding what human rights-based approaches (HRBAs) to health and development mean and why they matter, Power, Suffering, and the Struggle for Dignity provides a solid foundation for comprehending what a human rights framework implies and the potential for social transformation it entails. Applying a human rights framework to health demands that we think about our own suffering and that of others, as well as the fundamental causes of that suffering. What is our agency as human subjects with rights and dignity, and what prevents us from acting in certain circumstances? What roles are played by others in decisions that affect our health? How do we determine whether what we may see as "natural" is actually the result of mutable, human policies and practices? Alicia Ely Yamin couples theory with personal examples of HRBAs at work and shows the impact they have had on people's lives and health outcomes. Analyzing the successes of and challenges to using human rights frameworks for health, Yamin charts what can be learned from these experiences, from conceptualization to implementation, setting out explicit assumptions about how we can create social transformation. The ultimate concern of Power, Suffering, and the Struggle for Dignity is to promote movement from analysis to action, so that we can begin to use human rights frameworks to effect meaningful social change in global health, and beyond.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812247749 20170502
Power, Suffering, and the Struggle for Dignity provides a solid foundation for comprehending what a human rights framework implies and the potential for greater justice in health it entails.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812292190 20170502
Book
1 online resource (248 pages) : illustrations.
  • Chapter 1. Introduction Chapter 2. Creating a Dataset Chapter 3. A Cognitive Approach to IJ Decision Making Chapter 4. Local Conditions and IJ Decision Making Chapter 5. Appealing to the Board of Immigration Appeals Chapter 6. The Policy Gap and Asylum Outcomes Chapter 7. IJs and Reform of the U.S. Asylum System Notes References Index Acknowledgments.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812246605 20160802
Although there are legal norms to secure the uniform treatment of asylum claims in the United States, anecdotal and empirical evidence suggest that strategic and economic interests also influence asylum outcomes. Previous research has demonstrated considerable variation in how immigration judges decide seemingly similar cases, which implies a host of legal concerns-not the least of which is whether judicial bias is more determinative of the decision to admit those fleeing persecution to the United States than is the merit of the claim. These disparities also raise important policy considerations about how to fix what many perceive to be a broken adjudication system. With theoretical sophistication and empirical rigor, Immigration Judges and U.S. Asylum Policy investigates more than 500,000 asylum cases that were decided by U.S. immigration judges between 1990 and 2010. The authors find that judges treat certain facts about an asylum applicant more objectively than others: facts determined to be legally relevant tend to be treated similarly by judges of different political ideologies, while facts considered extralegal are treated subjectively. Furthermore, the authors examine how local economic and political conditions as well as congressional reforms have affected outcomes in asylum cases, concluding with a series of policy recommendations aimed at improving the quality of immigration law decision making rather than trying to reduce disparities between decision makers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812246605 20160802
Immigration Judges and U.S. Asylum Policy investigates hundreds of thousands of U.S. asylum cases with theoretical sophistication and empirical rigor, finding that immigration judges tend to assess legally relevant facts objectively while their decisions may be subjectively influenced by extralegal facts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812290370 20160802
Book
1 online resource (335 pages).
  • Introduction Chapter 1. Three Stories of Aid in Danger: From Baghdad and Muttur to Solferino 00 Chapter 2. The Twin Challenges for Contemporary Humanitarianism Chapter 3. The Dangers They Face: Understanding Violence Against Aid Workers and Agencies Chapter 4. The Dominant Explanations: Competing Discourses of Aid Chapter 5. Explanations in the Shadows: Competing Images of Aid Chapter 6. Coping with Danger: Paradigms of Humanitarian Security Management Conclusion. Reclaiming Humanity List of Interviewees Notes Bibliography Index Acknowledgments.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812246032 20160614
Humanitarian aid workers increasingly remain present in contexts of violence and are injured, kidnapped, and killed as a result. Since 9/11 and in response to these dangers, aid organizations have fortified themselves to shield their staff and programs from outside threats. In Aid in Danger, Larissa Fast critically examines the causes of violence against aid workers and the consequences of the approaches aid agencies use to protect themselves from attack. Based on more than a decade of research, Aid in Danger explores the assumptions underpinning existing explanations of and responses to violence against aid workers. According to Fast, most explanations of attacks locate the causes externally and maintain an image of aid workers as an exceptional category of civilians. The resulting approaches to security rely on separation and fortification and alienate aid workers from those in need, representing both a symptom and a cause of crisis in the humanitarian system. Missing from most analyses are the internal vulnerabilities, exemplified in the everyday decisions and ordinary human frailties and organizational mistakes that sometimes contribute to the conditions leading to violence. This oversight contributes to the normalization of danger in aid work and undermines the humanitarian ethos. As an alternative, Fast proposes a relational framework that captures both external threats and internal vulnerabilities. By uncovering overlooked causes of violence, Aid in Danger offers a unique perspective on the challenges of providing aid in perilous settings and on the prospects of reforming the system in service of core humanitarian values.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812246032 20160614
Aid in Danger explores why aid workers are attacked, kidnapped, and killed around the world and critically examines how aid agencies respond to these dangers. It addresses a timely and neglected topic, providing a unique analytical perspective on broader issues of humanitarianism and humanitarian reform.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812209631 20160619
Book
1 online resource (311 pages).
For the last thirty years, documented human rights violations have been met with an unprecedented rise in demands for accountability. This trend challenges the use of amnesties which typically foreclose opportunities for criminal prosecutions that some argue are crucial to transitional justice. Recent developments have seen amnesties circumvented, overturned, and resisted by lawyers, states, and judiciaries committed to ending impunity for human rights violations. Yet, despite this global movement, the use of amnesties since the 1970s has not declined. Amnesties, Accountability, and Human Rights examines why and how amnesties persist in the face of mounting pressure to prosecute the perpetrators of human rights violations. Drawing on more than 700 amnesties instituted between 1970 and 2005, Renee Jeffery maps out significant trends in the use of amnesty and offers a historical account of how both the use and the perception of amnesty has changed. As mechanisms to facilitate transitions to democracy, to reconcile divided societies, or to end violent conflicts, amnesties have been adapted to suit the competing demands of contemporary postconflict politics and international accountability norms. Through the history of one evolving political instrument, Amnesties, Accountability, and Human Rights sheds light on the changing thought, practice, and goals of human rights discourse generally.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812245899 20160616
Book
1 online resource (381 pages) : illustrations.
Book
1 online resource (248 pages).
Analyzing "heritage events"-from Roma wedding music to Trinidadian wining, Moroccan verbal art, and neopagan rituals-Cultural Heritage in Transit tracks the effects of the heritage industry, focusing on cultural rights and human rights writ large.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812209464 20160613
Are human rights universal? The immediate response is "yes, of course." However, that simple affirmation assumes agreement about definitions of the "human" as well as what a human is entitled to under law, bringing us quickly to concepts such as freedom, property, and the inalienability of both. The assumption that we all mean the same things by these terms carries much political import, especially given that different communities (national, ethnic, religious, gendered) enact some of the most basic categories of human experience (self, home, freedom, sovereignty) differently. But whereas legal definitions often seek to eliminate ambiguity in order to define and protect the rights of humanity, ambiguity is in fact inherently human, especially in performances of heritage where the rights to sense, to imagine, and to claim cultural identities that resist circumscription are at play. Cultural Heritage in Transit examines the intangibilities of human rights in the realm of heritage production, focusing not only on the ephemeral culture of those who perform it but also on the ambiguities present in the idea of cultural property in general-who claims it? who may use it? who should not but does? In this volume, folklorists, ethnologists, and anthropologists analyze the practice and performance of culture in particular contexts-including Roma wedding music, Trinidadian wining, Moroccan verbal art, and Neopagan rituals-in order to draw apart the social, political, and aesthetic materialities of heritage production, including inequities and hierarchies that did not exist before. The authors collectively craft theoretical frameworks to make sense of the ways the rights of nations interact with the rights of individuals and communities when the public value of artistic creations is constituted through international law. Contributors: Valdimar Tr. Hafstein, Deborah Kapchan, Barbro Klein, Sabina Magliocco, Dorothy Noyes, Philip W. Scher, Carol Silverman.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812245943 20160613
Book
1 online resource (310 pages).
Book
1 online resource (201 pages).
  • Preface Introduction -Rene Lemarchand 1 Mass Murder in Eastern Congo, 1996-1997 -Filip Reyntjens and Rene Lemarchand 2 Burundi 1972: Genocide Denied, Revised, and Remembered -Rene Lemarchand 3 "Every Herero Will Be Shot": Genocide, Concentration Camps, and Slave Labor in German South-West Africa -Dominik J. Schaller 4 Extermination, Extinction, Genocide: British Colonialism and Tasmanian Aborigines -Shayne Breen 5 Tibet: A Neo-Colonial Genocide -Claude Levenson 6 The Anfal Campaign Against the Kurds: Chemical Weapons in the Service of Mass Murder -Choman Hardi 7 The Assyrian Genocide: A Tale of Oblivion and Denial -Hannibal Travis 8 The "Gypsy Problem": An Invisible Genocide -Michael Stewart Notes List of Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812222630 20160605
Unlike the Holocaust, Rwanda, Cambodia, or Armenia, scant attention has been paid to the human tragedies analyzed in this book. From German Southwest Africa (now Namibia), Burundi, and eastern Congo to Tasmania, Tibet, and Kurdistan, from the mass killings of the Roms by the Nazis to the extermination of the Assyrians in Ottoman Turkey, the mind reels when confronted with the inhuman acts that have been consigned to oblivion. Forgotten Genocides: Oblivion, Denial, and Memory gathers eight essays about genocidal conflicts that are unremembered and, as a consequence, understudied. The contributors, scholars in political science, anthropology, history, and other fields, seek to restore these mass killings to the place they deserve in the public consciousness. Remembrance of long forgotten crimes is not the volume's only purpose-equally significant are the rich quarry of empirical data offered in each chapter, the theoretical insights provided, and the comparative perspectives suggested for the analysis of genocidal phenomena. While each genocide is unique in its circumstances and motives, the essays in this volume explain that deliberate concealment and manipulation of the facts by the perpetrators are more often the rule than the exception, and that memory often tends to distort the past and blame the victims while exonerating the killers. Although the cases discussed here are but a sample of a litany going back to biblical times, Forgotten Genocides offers an important examination of the diversity of contexts out of which repeatedly emerge the same hideous realities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812222630 20160605
Book
vi, 256 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Obligations of states to prevent and prohibit torture in an extraterritorial perspective / Manfred Nowak
  • Obligations to protect the right to life : constructing a rule of transfer regarding small arms and light weapons / Barbara Frey
  • Growing barriers : international refugee law / Thomas Gammeltoft-Hansen
  • Diagonal environmental rights / John H. Knox
  • The human rights responsibility of international assistance and cooperation in health / Judith Bueno de Mesquita, Paul Hunt, Rajat Khosla
  • The world food crisis and the right to adequate food / Michael Windfuhr
  • Labor standards and extraterritoriality : Cambodian textile exports and the international labour organization / Virginia A. Leary
  • A sort of homecoming : the right to housing / Malcolm Langford
  • Protecting rights in the face of scarcity : the right to water / Amanda Cahill.
Globalization challenges fundamental principles governing international law, especially with respect to state sovereignty and international relations. This transformation has had a significant impact on the practice of trade law, financial regulation, and environmental law but relatively little effect on one area of law and regulation: human rights. Universal Human Rights and Extraterritorial Obligations examines both the international and domestic foundations of human rights law. What other contemporary human rights debates have almost totally ignored is that in an increasingly interdependent world-where public and private international actors have great influence on the lives of individuals everywhere-it is insufficient to assess only the record of domestic governments in human rights. It is equally important to assess the effect of actions taken by intergovernmental organizations, international private entities, and foreign states. From this standpoint, contributors to this book address how states' actions or omissions may affect the prospects of individuals in foreign states and asks important questions: To what extent do agricultural policies of rich countries influence the right to food in poorer countries? How do decisions to screen asylum seekers outside state borders affect refugee rights? How does cooperation among different states in the "war on terror" influence individuals' rights to be free from torture? This volume presents a brief for a more complex and updated approach to the protection of human rights worldwide.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812242157 20160604
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 385 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
This book focuses on international human rights. It explores the transformation of a world patterned by centuries of traditional structures of authority, gender abuse, racial prejudice, class divisions and slavery, colonial empires, and claims of national sovereignty into a global community.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812232745 20160527
Selected by Choice magazine as an Outstanding Academic Book for 1999 Using the theme of visions seen by those who dreamed of what might be, Lauren explores the dramatic transformation of a world patterned by centuries of traditional structures of authority, gender abuse, racial prejudice, class divisions and slavery, colonial empires, and claims of national sovereignty into a global community that now boldly proclaims that the way governments treat their own people is a matter of international concern-and sets the goal of human rights "for all peoples and all nations." Lauren makes clear the truly universal nature of this movement by drawing into his discussion people and cultures in every quadrant of the globe. In this regard, the book offers particularly remarkable revelations and insights when analyzing the impact of wars and revolutions, non-Western nations, struggles against sexism and racism, liberation movements and decolonization, nongovernmental organizations, and the courage and determination of countless numbers of common men and women who have contributed to the evolution of international human rights.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812215212 20160527
Green Library
Book
xvi, 283 p. ; 24 cm.
Fifteen countries have emerged from the collapse of the Soviet Union. Freedom's Ordeal recounts the struggles of these newly independent nations to achieve freedom and to establish support for fundamental human rights. Although history has shown that states emerging from collapsed empires rarely achieve full democracy in their first try, Peter Juviler analyzes these successor states as crucial and not always unpromising tests of democracy's viability in postcommunist countries. Taking into account the particularly difficult legacies of Soviet communism, Freedom's Ordeal is distinguished by its careful tracing of the historical background, with special attention to human rights before, during, and after communism. Juviler suggests that the culture and practices of despotism may wither wherever modernization conflicts with tyranny and with the curtailment or denial of democratic rights and freedoms.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812234183 20160527
Green Library
Book
xvi, 345 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxviii, 636 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Human Rights Education for the Twenty-First Century is a comprehensive resource for training, education, and raising awareness in a wide variety of settings, both formal and informal. A diverse group of contributors-experienced activists, education experts, and representatives of several international governmental organizations-provides a rich potpourri of ideas and real-world approaches to initiating, planning, and implementing programs for teaching people about their human rights and fundamental freedoms. This volume has been developed for a global audience of educators, scholars in many disciplines, nongovernmental organizations, and foundation officers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812216073 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xii, 272 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Exclusion from a public social space defined by qualities and values
  • Wielding employment discrimination against gay lawyers as a sword and shield
  • Defending the masculine identity of the military and its service members
  • Teaching that homosexuality is immoral
  • Representing the electorate's values
  • Promoting the all-American image of major league sports
  • Maintaining a distance between gay people and God in defense of greater orthodoxies
  • Conclusion: The importance of teaching the qualities and values of gay people.
From the first game of the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs on April 22, 1876, tens of thousands of men have played professional sports in the Big Four-baseball, basketball, football, and hockey-major professional sports leagues in the United States. Until April 29, 2013, however, when National Basketball Association center Jason Collins came out publicly as gay, not one of those tens of thousands of men had ever come out to the public as gay while an active player on a major league roster. Is it because gay men can't jump (or throw, or catch, or skate)? Or is it more likely that the costs of coming out are too high? In Antigay Bias in Role-Model Occupations, E. Gary Spitko argues that in the case of athletes, and others in role-model occupations, a record of widespread and frequently systematic employment discrimination has been excluding gay people from the public social spaces that identify and teach whom society respects and whom members of society should seek to emulate. Creating a typology of role models-lawyers/judges, soldiers, teachers, politicians, athletes, and clergy-and the positive values and character traits associated with them, Spitko demonstrates how employment discrimination has been used for the purpose of perpetuating the generally accepted notion that gay people are inferior because they do not possess the requisite qualities-integrity, masculinity, morality, representativeness, all-American-ness, and blessedness-associated with employment in these occupations. Combining the inspirational stories of LGBT trailblazers with analysis of historical data, anecdotal evidence, research, and literature, Antigay Bias in Role-Model Occupations is the first book to explore in a comprehensive fashion the broad effects of sexual orientation discrimination in role-model occupations well beyond its individual victims.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812248708 20170130
Green Library
Book
xii, 272 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Exclusion from a public social space defined by qualities and values
  • Wielding employment discrimination against gay lawyers as a sword and shield
  • Defending the masculine identity of the military and its service members
  • Teaching that homosexuality is immoral
  • Representing the electorate's values
  • Promoting the all-American image of major league sports
  • Maintaining a distance between gay people and God in defense of greater orthodoxies
  • Conclusion: The importance of teaching the qualities and values of gay people.
From the first game of the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs on April 22, 1876, tens of thousands of men have played professional sports in the Big Four-baseball, basketball, football, and hockey-major professional sports leagues in the United States. Until April 29, 2013, however, when National Basketball Association center Jason Collins came out publicly as gay, not one of those tens of thousands of men had ever come out to the public as gay while an active player on a major league roster. Is it because gay men can't jump (or throw, or catch, or skate)? Or is it more likely that the costs of coming out are too high? In Antigay Bias in Role-Model Occupations, E. Gary Spitko argues that in the case of athletes, and others in role-model occupations, a record of widespread and frequently systematic employment discrimination has been excluding gay people from the public social spaces that identify and teach whom society respects and whom members of society should seek to emulate. Creating a typology of role models-lawyers/judges, soldiers, teachers, politicians, athletes, and clergy-and the positive values and character traits associated with them, Spitko demonstrates how employment discrimination has been used for the purpose of perpetuating the generally accepted notion that gay people are inferior because they do not possess the requisite qualities-integrity, masculinity, morality, representativeness, all-American-ness, and blessedness-associated with employment in these occupations. Combining the inspirational stories of LGBT trailblazers with analysis of historical data, anecdotal evidence, research, and literature, Antigay Bias in Role-Model Occupations is the first book to explore in a comprehensive fashion the broad effects of sexual orientation discrimination in role-model occupations well beyond its individual victims.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812248708 20161219
Law Library (Crown)
Book
290 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Stephen Porter's Benevolent Empire examines political-refugee aid initiatives and related humanitarian endeavors led by American people and institutions from World War I through the Cold War, opening an important window onto the "short American century." Chronicling both international relief efforts and domestic resettlement programs aimed at dispossessed people from Europe, Latin America, and East Asia, Porter asks how, why, and with what effects American actors took responsibility for millions of victims of war, persecution, and political upheaval during these decades. Diverse forces within the American state and civil society directed these endeavors through public-private governing arrangements, a dynamic yielding both benefits and liabilities. Motivated by a variety of geopolitical, ethical, and cultural reasons, these advocates for humanitarian action typically shared a desire to portray the United States, to the American people and international audiences, as an exceptional, benevolent world power whose objects of concern might potentially include any vulnerable people across the globe. And though reality almost always fell short of that idealized vision, Porter argues that this omnivorous philanthropic energy helped propel and steer the ascendance of the United States to its position of elite global power. The messaging and administration of refugee aid initiatives informed key dimensions of American and international history during this period, including U.S. foreign relations, international humanitarianism and human rights, global migration and citizenship, and American political development and social relations at home. Benevolent Empire is thus simultaneously a history of the United States and the world beyond.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812248562 20161219
Green Library

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