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Book
xxi, 404 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
  • Part I. The military strategist
  • Tyro
  • The golden state
  • Into the gloom
  • The black hole
  • Swamped
  • Atlanta
  • The march
  • Bands of steel
  • Part II. The general and his army
  • The boys
  • Road warriors
  • Part III. The man and his families
  • Cump
  • Big time.
A profile of the iconic Civil War general explores the paradoxes attributed to his character to discuss such topics as his achievements as a military strategist, his contributions to the Transcontinental Railroad, and his tempestuous family relationships.
Green Library
Book
xvii, 310 p. : maps ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
390 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
In an elegantly illustrated volume, a noted historian reveals culture, society and history through the saga of war and its implements. Mankind's history has been determined by war. And throughout history, the way that wars are won and lost, and whether they are fought at all, has been determined more by weapons than any other single force. Before there was man, there were weapons. In his investigation of arms and culture, noted military historian Robert O'Connell goes all the way back to the first weapons: the claws, horns, and hooves of our evolutionary antecedents. Even then, a species' weaponry determined its future. So it has been for the human animal. From the ancient Assyrians' conquest of bronze, to the Toledo steel of the Spanish conquistadors, to the MIRV missiles of nuclear deterrence, the great weapons have set their own agendas. They continue to shape our culture and our lives today. THE SOUL OF THE SWORD gives world history from a club, gun, or aircraft carrier's perspective. Along the way, sidebars and drawings from premiere military illustrator John Batchelor illuminate the weapons themselves. In this fascinating book O'Connell unearths the extraordinary weapons of our past, and explains our most basic weapons as never before. Our killing tools are much more than fearsome curiosities; they are the engines of history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780684844077 20160527
Green Library
Book
271 p. ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 305 p.
'Accurst be he that first invented war', wrote Christopher Marlowe - a declaration that most of us would take as a literary, not literal, construction. But in this sweeping overview of the rise of civilization, Robert O'Connell finds that war is indeed an invention - an institution that arose due to very specific historical circumstances, an institution that now verges on extinction. In Ride of the Second Horseman, O'Connell probes the distant human past to show how and why war arose. He begins with a definition that distinguishes between war and mere feuding: war involves group rather than individual issues, political or economic goals, and direction by some governmental structure, carried out with the intention of lasting results. With this definition, he finds that ants are the only other creatures that conduct it - battling other colonies for territory and slaves. But ants, unlike humans, are driven by their genes; in humans, changes in our culture and subsistence patterns, not our genetic hardware, brought the rise of organized warfare. O'Connell draws on anthropology and archeology to locate the rise of war sometime after the human transition from nomadic hunting and gathering to agriculture, when society split between farmers and pastoralists. Around 5500 BC, these pastoralists initiated the birth of war with raids on Middle Eastern agricultural settlements. The farmers responded by ringing their villages with walls, setting off a process of further social development, intensified combat, and ultimately the rise of complex urban societies dependent upon warfare to help stabilize what amounted to highly volatile population structures, beset by frequent bouts of famine and epidemic disease. In times of overpopulation, the armies either conquered new lands or self-destructed, leaving fewer mouths to feed. In times of underpopulation, slaves were taken to provide labor. O'Connell explores the histories of the civilizations of ancient Sumeria, Egypt, Assyria, China, and the New World, showing how war came to each and how it adapted to varying circumstances. On the other hand, societies based on trade employed war much more selectively and pragmatically. Thus, Minoan Crete, long protected from marauding pastoralists, developed a wealthy mercantile society marked by unmilitaristic attitudes, equality between men and women, and a relative absence of class distinctions. In Assyria, by contrast, war came to be an end in itself, in a culture dominated by male warriors. Despite the violence in the world today, O'Connell finds reason for hope. The industrial revolution broke the old patterns of subsistence: war no longer serves the demographic purpose it once did. Fascinating and provocative, Ride of the Second Horseman offers a far-reaching tour of human history that suggests the age-old cycle of war may now be near its end.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195119206 20160605
Book
viii, 305 p. ; 25 cm.
Book
viii, 305 p. ; 25 cm.
'Accurst be he that first invented war', wrote Christopher Marlowe - a declaration that most of us would take as a literary, not literal, construction. But in this sweeping overview of the rise of civilization, Robert O'Connell finds that war is indeed an invention - an institution that arose due to very specific historical circumstances, an institution that now verges on extinction. In Ride of the Second Horseman, O'Connell probes the distant human past to show how and why war arose. He begins with a definition that distinguishes between war and mere feuding: war involves group rather than individual issues, political or economic goals, and direction by some governmental structure, carried out with the intention of lasting results. With this definition, he finds that ants are the only other creatures that conduct it - battling other colonies for territory and slaves. But ants, unlike humans, are driven by their genes; in humans, changes in our culture and subsistence patterns, not our genetic hardware, brought the rise of organized warfare. O'Connell draws on anthropology and archeology to locate the rise of war sometime after the human transition from nomadic hunting and gathering to agriculture, when society split between farmers and pastoralists. Around 5500 BC, these pastoralists initiated the birth of war with raids on Middle Eastern agricultural settlements. The farmers responded by ringing their villages with walls, setting off a process of further social development, intensified combat, and ultimately the rise of complex urban societies dependent upon warfare to help stabilize what amounted to highly volatile population structures, beset by frequent bouts of famine and epidemic disease. In times of overpopulation, the armies either conquered new lands or self-destructed, leaving fewer mouths to feed. In times of underpopulation, slaves were taken to provide labor. O'Connell explores the histories of the civilizations of ancient Sumeria, Egypt, Assyria, China, and the New World, showing how war came to each and how it adapted to varying circumstances. On the other hand, societies based on trade employed war much more selectively and pragmatically. Thus, Minoan Crete, long protected from marauding pastoralists, developed a wealthy mercantile society marked by unmilitaristic attitudes, equality between men and women, and a relative absence of class distinctions. In Assyria, by contrast, war came to be an end in itself, in a culture dominated by male warriors. Despite the violence in the world today, O'Connell finds reason for hope. The industrial revolution broke the old patterns of subsistence: war no longer serves the demographic purpose it once did. Fascinating and provocative, Ride of the Second Horseman offers a far-reaching tour of human history that suggests the age-old cycle of war may now be near its end.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195119206 20160605
Green Library
Book
409 p.
  • Introduction - a fatal vision-- in the beginning - traditions of the naval world-- upon this rock - the technological revolution and the prophet Mahan-- crusaders in blue and the grail of seapower-- sacred vessel - the dreadnought-- martyrdom - dreadnoughts in the wake of Versailles-- requiem - the Washington Naval Conference-- life after death - rehabilitating the dreadnought-- conclusion - vampires of seapower.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813311166 20160528
This irreverent account of the modern battleship and its place in American naval history argues that the vaunted battleship was in fact never an effective weapon of war. For many decades the world's navies raced to build battleships at the expense of more effective forms of naval force. Dreadnoughts became the international currency of great power status, subject to the same anxious accountancy as nuclear weapons today. The author contends that the battleships actually have never played an important role in the outcome of any modern war, but nevertheless have continued to be built and rebuilt - and revered by many - right up to the present. The book aims to be a cautionary tale about the often unacknowledged influence of human faith, culture and tradition on the important, costly and supposedly rational process of nations arming themselves for war. The author also wrote "Of Arms and Men: A History of War, Weapons, and Aggression".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813311166 20160528
Green Library
Book
viii, 367 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
In this book, Robert O'Connell examines the role and significance of weapons from the dawn of human history to the present, and the attempts of Western civilization to come to terms with the results of its own inventiveness. It integrates the evolution of human society with the development of weapons and strategy. While primarily historical in his approach, O'Connell also draws upon anthropology, sociology, biology, and literature in his effort to explain certain recurring phenomena of warfare: the human need to dehumanize the enemy, arms races involving weapons which have developed beyond the point of utility, or the ideal of heroism rendered obsolete by deadly new technologies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195053593 20160528
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)

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