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Collection
Graduate School of Education Open Archive
This book is built around three enlightened attempts to rephrase learning and instruction in ways more sensitive to the social organization of learning situations. This paper extends the effort by pointing at a growing scandal. Institutions of learning have been corrupted by the market. Learning has been measured, credentialed, bought, and sold to the point that educational reformers have to worry about the use and misuse of their most important product. They have to worry about the connections learning makes to persistent structural inequalities. Learning has been commodified, and efforts to reform learning instruction must be sensitive not just to the gentle facts of how it is best done by people working together, but to the more disturbing facts of how it can be isolated, tested, administered, fetishized, and put up for sale in the reproduction of career and income lines. Serious advances in learning theory must be protected from the possibility that they can be used to make things worse.

2. Global Norming [2011] Online

Collection
Graduate School of Education Open Archive
The twentieth-century nation state has had its say on how we must educate, measure, and explain children and schooling. For better and for worse, the twentieth-century state made promises of progress, development, democracy, education, and, for every new generation, enough equality to justify a story about a level playing field for school children. Almost all nation states make these promises and keep track of just how much they have delivered. To take a seat among the great nations of the world, every country has had to make an accounting of itself: of its populations, its economies, its inequalities, and its possibilities. Every state has had to produce data and reports on its markets, its systems of health care and education, and its laws and promises of justice.
Collection
Graduate School of Education Open Archive
Ruth Benedict (1948) offered an evocative image: that studying culture amounts to studying individual psychology writ large. We resurrect the writ large image to make the argument that all ethnography reaches for a portrait of everything at stage in the details of peopleÍs lives. Usual approaches to education -- psychology, economics, sociology, even history -- deliver important slices, but anthropologists seek the full schedule of struggles that make every moment significant, potentially treacherous, and likely political. A view of anthropology as inquiry into the layers of demanding and promising situations and interpretations should set the standard for how any cultural context -- including schools -- should be studied.
Collection
Graduate School of Education Open Archive
This note joins warnings from Shakespeare and wordplay from James Joyce to critique the division of educational researchers into quantitative and qualitative camps. Beware the dichotomies we frame for each other, said Shakespeare. Break them down with humor, added Joyce. Unhelpful choices, falsely pitted against each other in a specific cultural context, are strengthened by participants picking sides or, sometimes worse, collapsing opposing sides into a compromised middle. Only a confrontation, in this case, humorous, with the conditions maintaining the opposition promises relief. Not this, not that, but "one aneither," said Joyce. Even the terms, quantitative or qualitative, must be discarded. Their mutual antagonism can grow better terms: quantentative and squalortative
Collection
Graduate School of Education Open Archive
A popular but risky way to play nature and nurture with children comes in two parts: the first describes what they cannot do at an early age; the second assumes that the identified limitations predict directly what they cannot do as adults. A more reliable way to predict what children will do as adults is to describe the roles available in the social structure that will acquire them regardless of their abilities. The analytic view from adult roles is most revealing and corrective in a society with a systematic and unjust misfit between the likely potentials of children and the jobs ready to reward them with position and status. The possibility of an unjust misfit requires, as Emerson might say, that we listen to ""the tell-tale body"" of the children to see what they have been through, to see what their ""face and eyes reveal"" about getting squeezed into lives smaller than promised at birth.
Collection
Graduate School of Education Open Archive
Culturally and educationally, the United States specializes in the production of kinds of persons described first by their ethnic, racial, and linguistic groups and second by their supposed mental abilities. Overlaps between the two systems of classification are frequent, systematically haphazard, and often deleterious. An examination of classrooms around the country shows shifting currents of concern and tension that invite the attribution of labels for mental and/or minority group status. This paper introduces a language for a cultural analysis--a language of people interpreting the interpretations of others-- and pursues an example from a classroom where both the good sense and the dangers of categories for LD and minority group status are on display.
Book
xvi, 264 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction (Herv Varenne and Ray McDermott. ) * The Makings Of Some Educational Facts Adam, Adam, Adam, and Adam (R. McDermott and H. Varenne. ) The House of Farell and the House of Kinney: Literacies at Home (H. Varenne and R. McDermott. ) The Voice of the Choir, the Voices in the Choir (H. Varenne and Merry Naddeo. ) Joint Action on the Wild Side of Manhattan (H. Varenne and Rosemarie Rizzo-Tolk. ) Racing in Place (H. Varenne, Shelley Goldman, and R. McDermott. ) * Education And The Making Of Cultural Facts Education in Culture (H. Varenne and R. McDermott. ) Ways with Theoretical Words (H. Varenne and R. McDermott. ) Local Construction and Educational Facts (H. Varenne. ) Conclusion: Beyond Explaining Why (H. Varenne and R. McDermott.).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813331652 20160528
In this controversial work, Herv Varenne and Ray McDermott explore education as cultural phenomenona construct of artifice and reality we impose upon ourselves. Questioning how the American education system defines and measures success and failure, Successful Failure is a must-read for anyone interested in educational reform, the American educational system, and the anthropology of education. }In this controversial work, Herv Varenne and Ray McDermott explore education as cultural phenomenona construct of artifice and reality we impose upon ourselves. The authors discuss in five case studies how the American education system defines and measures success and failure, why there is polarization between suburban schools and urban schools, and what about our system leads us to focus on the negative. Their exploration focuses not on the people or the activities of the system, but on the institutions themselves: who decided what was a success or failure? How was the identification done, and with what consequences?This important and timely book is a must-read for anyone interested in educational reform, the American educational system, and the anthropology of education. }.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813331652 20160528
In this controversial work, Herv Varenne and Ray McDermott explore education as cultural phenomenona construct of artifice and reality we impose upon ourselves. The authors discuss in five case studies how the American education system defines and measures success and failure, why there is polarization between suburban schools and urban schools, and what about our system leads us to focus on the negative. Their exploration focuses not on the people or the activities of the system, but on the institutions themselves: who decided what was a success or failure? How was the identification done, and with what consequences?This important and timely book is a must-read for anyone interested in educational reform, the American educational system, and the anthropology of education.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813391298 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xvi, 264 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction (Herv Varenne and Ray McDermott. ) * The Makings Of Some Educational Facts Adam, Adam, Adam, and Adam (R. McDermott and H. Varenne. ) The House of Farell and the House of Kinney: Literacies at Home (H. Varenne and R. McDermott. ) The Voice of the Choir, the Voices in the Choir (H. Varenne and Merry Naddeo. ) Joint Action on the Wild Side of Manhattan (H. Varenne and Rosemarie Rizzo-Tolk. ) Racing in Place (H. Varenne, Shelley Goldman, and R. McDermott. ) * Education And The Making Of Cultural Facts Education in Culture (H. Varenne and R. McDermott. ) Ways with Theoretical Words (H. Varenne and R. McDermott. ) Local Construction and Educational Facts (H. Varenne. ) Conclusion: Beyond Explaining Why (H. Varenne and R. McDermott.).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813331652 20160528
In this controversial work, Herv Varenne and Ray McDermott explore education as cultural phenomenona construct of artifice and reality we impose upon ourselves. Questioning how the American education system defines and measures success and failure, Successful Failure is a must-read for anyone interested in educational reform, the American educational system, and the anthropology of education. }In this controversial work, Herv Varenne and Ray McDermott explore education as cultural phenomenona construct of artifice and reality we impose upon ourselves. The authors discuss in five case studies how the American education system defines and measures success and failure, why there is polarization between suburban schools and urban schools, and what about our system leads us to focus on the negative. Their exploration focuses not on the people or the activities of the system, but on the institutions themselves: who decided what was a success or failure? How was the identification done, and with what consequences?This important and timely book is a must-read for anyone interested in educational reform, the American educational system, and the anthropology of education. }.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813331652 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xvii, 511 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction: Ethnographic responsibility / Joel Kuipers and Ray McDermott
  • Fieldwork
  • Ethnographic knowledge
  • Lexicographical approach
  • Kinds of color
  • The world of plants
  • Modes of communication
  • Orientation
  • Agriculture
  • The early years.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
21 leaves.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xi, 250 leaves, bound.
SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Book
xiv, 241 leaves, bound.
SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Book
viii, 251 leaves bound.
SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Book
xv, 249 leaves bound.
SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections

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