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Book
xix, 721 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations Foreword Preface Introduction 1. Forming the DRV Government 2. The Government at Work 3. Defense 4. Peace or War? 5. Seeking Foreign Friends 6. Material Dreams and Realities 7. Dealing with Domestic Opposition 8. The Indochinese Communist Party and the Vie?t Minh 9. Mass Mobilization Epilogue Notes Sources Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520274150 20160611
Amidst the revolutionary euphoria of August 1945, most Vietnamese believed that colonialism and war were being left behind in favor of independence and modernization. The late-September British-French coup de force in Saigon cast a pall over such assumptions. Ho Chi Minh tried to negotiate a mutually advantageous relationship with France, but meanwhile told his lieutenants to plan for a war in which the nascent state might have to survive without allies. In this landmark study, David Marr evokes the uncertainty and contingency as well as coherence and momentum of fast-paced events. Mining recently accessible sources in Aix-en-Provence and Hanoi, Marr explains what became the largest, most intense mobilization of human resources ever seen in Vietnam.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520274150 20160611
Green Library
Book
xxviii, 602 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
1945: the most significant year in the modern history of Vietnam. One thousand years of dynastic politics and monarchist ideology came to an end. Eight decades of French rule lay shattered. Five years of Japanese military occupation ceased. Allied leaders determined that Chinese troops in the north of Indochina and British troops in the South would receive the Japanese surrender. Ho Chi Minh proclaimed the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, with himself as president. Drawing on extensive archival research, interviews and an examination of published memoirs and documents, this is a detailed and descriptive analysis of this crucial moment in Vietnamese history. It shows how Vietnam became a vortex of intense international and domestic competition for power, and how actions in Washington and Paris, as well as Saigon, Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh's mountain headquarters, interacted and clashed, often with surprising results. Marr's book probes the ways in which war and revolution sustain each other, tracing a process that should interest political scientists and sociologists as well as historians and Southeast Asia specialists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520078338 20160528
The year 1945 was the most significant in the modern history of Vietnam. One thousand years of dynastic politics and monarchist ideology came to an end. Eight decades of French rule lay shattered and five years of Japanese occupation ceased. Drawing on extensive archival research, interviews and an examination of published memoirs and documents, David G. Marr has written a detailed and descriptive analysis of this crucial moment in Vietnamese history, and shows how Vietnam became a vortex of intense international and domestic competition for power.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520212282 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Book
xxviii, 602 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
1945: the most significant year in the modern history of Vietnam. One thousand years of dynastic politics and monarchist ideology came to an end. Eight decades of French rule lay shattered. Five years of Japanese military occupation ceased. Allied leaders determined that Chinese troops in the north of Indochina and British troops in the South would receive the Japanese surrender. Ho Chi Minh proclaimed the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, with himself as president. Drawing on extensive archival research, interviews and an examination of published memoirs and documents, this is a detailed and descriptive analysis of this crucial moment in Vietnamese history. It shows how Vietnam became a vortex of intense international and domestic competition for power, and how actions in Washington and Paris, as well as Saigon, Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh's mountain headquarters, interacted and clashed, often with surprising results. Marr's book probes the ways in which war and revolution sustain each other, tracing a process that should interest political scientists and sociologists as well as historians and Southeast Asia specialists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520078338 20160528
The year 1945 was the most significant in the modern history of Vietnam. One thousand years of dynastic politics and monarchist ideology came to an end. Eight decades of French rule lay shattered and five years of Japanese occupation ceased. Drawing on extensive archival research, interviews and an examination of published memoirs and documents, David G. Marr has written a detailed and descriptive analysis of this crucial moment in Vietnamese history, and shows how Vietnam became a vortex of intense international and domestic competition for power.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520212282 20160528
Green Library

5. Vietnam [1992]

Book
lxxviii, 393 p. : 1 map ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
xi, 468 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of Abbreviations Preface Introduction 1. The Colonial Setting 2. Morality Instruction 3. Ethics and Politics 4. Language and Literacy 5. The Question of Women 6. Perceptions of the Past 7. Harmony and Struggle 8. Knowledge Power 9. Learning from Experience 10. Conclusion Glossary Selected Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520050815 20160528
Despite the historical importance of the Vietnam War, we know very little about what the Vietnamese people thought and felt prior to the conflict. Americans have tended to treat Vietnam as an extension of their own hopes and fears, successes and failures, rather than addressing the Vietnamese record. In this volume, David Marr offers the first serious intellectual history of Vietnam, focusing on the period just prior to full-scale revolutionary upheaval and protracted military conflict.He argues that changes in political and social consciousness between 1920 and 1945 were a necessary precondition to the mass mobilization and people's war strategies employed subsequently against the French and the Americans. Thus he rejects the prevailing notion that Vietnamese success was primarily due to communist techniques of organization. However, "Vietnamese Tradition on Trial" goes beyond simply accounting for anyone's victory or defeat to an informed description of intellectual currents in general.Replying for his information on a previously ignored corpus of books, pamphlets, periodicals, and leaflets, the author isolates eight issues of central concern to twentieth-century Vietnamese. The new intelligentsia - indubitably the product of a peculiar French colonial milieu, yet never divorced from the Vietnamese past and always looking to a brilliant Vietnamese future - spearheaded every debate beginning in 1925. After 1945, Vietnamese intellectuals either placed themselves under ruthless battlefield discipline or withdrew to private meditation. David Marr suggests that the new problems facing Vietnamese today make both of these approaches anachronistic. Whether the Vietnam Communist Party will allow citizens to subject received wisdom to critical debate, to formulate new explanations of reality, to test those explanations in practice, is the essential question lingering at the end of this study.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520050815 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Book
xi, 468 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 468 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xi, 468 p. : ill.
Book
xix, 322 p. illus., maps, ports. 24 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xix, 322 p. illus., maps, ports. 24 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (135 pages).
  • Introduction; A Fork in the Road; The Road into Hell; Hell on Earth; The First Battles; The Party Comes To Phu-Rieng; The Hour Before The Storm; The 1930 Struggle of the Phu-rieng Rubber Workers; The Red Seeds of Phu-Rieng; Notes.
Phu Rieng was one of many French rubber plantations in colonial Vietnam; Tran Tu Binh was one of 17,606 laborers brought to work there in 1927, and his memoir is a straightforward, emotionally searing account of how one Vietnamese youth became involved in revolutionary politics. The connection between this early experience and later activities of the author becomes clear as we learn that Tran Tu Binh survived imprisonment on Con Son island to help engineer the general uprising in Hanoi in 1945. The Red Earth is the first of dozens of such works by veterans of the 1924-45 struggle in Vietnam.
Book
xi, 90 p. ; 21 cm.
Phu Rieng was one of many French rubber plantations in colonial Vietnam; Tran Tu Binh was one of 17,606 laborers brought to work there in 1927, and his memoir is a straightforward, emotionally searing account of how one Vietnamese youth became involved in revolutionary politics. The connection between this early experience and later activities of the author becomes clear as we learn that Tran Tu Binh survived imprisonment on Con Son island to help engineer the general uprising in Hanoi in 1945. The Red Earth is the first of dozens of such works by veterans of the 1924-45 struggle in Vietnam to be published in English translation. It is important reading for all those interested in the many-faceted history of modern Vietnam and of communism in the non-Western world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780896801196 20180530
Green Library
Book
189 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xviii, 416 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
Green Library
Book
x, 248 p., [5] p. of plates : ill. ; 26 cm.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (135 pages).
Phu Rieng was one of many French rubber plantations in colonial Vietnam; Tran Tu Binh was one of 17,606 laborers brought to work there in 1927, and his memoir is a straightforward, emotionally searing account of how one Vietnamese youth became involved in revolutionary politics. The connection between this early experience and later activities of the author becomes clear as we learn that Tran Tu Binh survived imprisonment on Con Son island to help engineer the general uprising in Hanoi in 1945. The Red Earth is the first of dozens of such works by veterans of the 1924-45 struggle in Vietnam to be published in English translation. It is important reading for all those interested in the many-faceted history of modern Vietnam and of communism in the non-Western world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780896801196 20180530
Book
xvi, 436 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
113 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Phan Bội Châu. Prison notes.--Marr, D. G. Introduction.--Hồ Chí Minh. Prison diary.--Marr, D. G. Introduction.
Green Library

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