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Book
1 online resource.
Research Methods in Human-Computer Interaction is a comprehensive guide to performing research and is essential reading for both quantitative and qualitative methods. Since the first edition was published in 2009, the book has been adopted for use at leading universities around the world, including Harvard University, Carnegie-Mellon University, the University of Washington, the University of Toronto, HiOA (Norway), KTH (Sweden), Tel Aviv University (Israel), and many others. Chapters cover a broad range of topics relevant to the collection and analysis of HCI data, going beyond experimental design and surveys, to cover ethnography, diaries, physiological measurements, case studies, crowdsourcing, and other essential elements in the well-informed HCI researcher's toolkit. Continual technological evolution has led to an explosion of new techniques and a need for this updated 2nd edition, to reflect the most recent research in the field and newer trends in research methodology. This revision contains updates throughout, including more detail on statistical tests, coding qualitative data, and data collection via mobile devices and sensors. Other new material covers performing research with children, older adults, and people with cognitive impairments.
Book
1 online resource
  • Front Cover; Ensuring Digital Accessibility through Process and Policy; Copyright; Critical Acclaim for Ensuring Digital Accessibility through Process and Policy ; Contents; About the Authors; Preface; Chapter 1: Introduction to accessible technology; Introduction; Defining Accessible Technology; Various Types of Disabilities; Accessibility Helps Those Without Disabilities; Various Types of Technologies; Mobile Devices, Apps, and Accessibility; Accessibility in Desktop and Laptop Computers; How does Accessibility Work?; Accessibility in Kiosks and Voting Machines
  • Accessible Technology vs. Augmentative Communication and ProstheticsVarious Types of Policies; How Policies and Laws Can Lead to Improved Access to Digital Information; Summary; A Note About the Usage of Terms; References; Chapter 2: The history of access technology; Introduction; Early History of Assistive Technologies (through the 1960s); The Invention of the Typewriter; The Record Player and the Audiobook; TTYs for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing; The 1970s-Present; Optical Character Recognition, Synthetic Speech, and the Flatbed Scanner; Captioning; Speech Recognition
  • Speech Recognition and Learning Disabled StudentsScreen Reader Technology; Assistive and Augmentative Communication; Power Wheelchairs and Prosthetics; Current Events and Trends; How Accessible Technology has Crossed Over into the Mainstream; Understanding Why/How People with Disabilities Adopt Technology; How the Changes in Technology Over Time Must Influence Changes in Solutions; Summary; References; Chapter 3: The discriminatory impact of digital inaccessibility; Introduction; Separate But Equal in the Context of Disability; Same Time; Same Price; Same Content
  • Same Time, Same Content, Same Price, And Now . . . Same Hardware and SoftwareSummary; References; Chapter 4: Technical standards for accessibility; Accessibility Standards; The World Wide Web Consortium and the Web Accessibility Initiative; Web Accessibility Standards; The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines; Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines; Atag 2.0; User Agent Accessibility Guidelines; Relationship to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0; Relationship to the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) 2.0; Accessible Rich Internet Application; Epub
  • Applying WCAG 2.0 to Non-Web Information and Communications TechnologiesSummary; References; Chapter 5: U.S. laws and lawsuits; Introduction; Applicability of American Laws to Technology Developers; The Pace of Change in the Development of Technology Affects the Design of Legal Definitions of Access; Federal Statutes that have an Impact on the Accessibility of Technology; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and Title II of the ADA; Public Colleges: A Case Study in the Application of Title II and 504 to Change the Behavior of Tech and Digital Content Ven ...
Ensuring Digital Accessibility through Process and Policy provides readers with a must-have resource to digital accessibility from both a technical and policy perspective. Inaccessible digital interfaces and content often lead to forms of societal discrimination that may be illegal under various laws. This book is unique in that it provides a multi-disciplinary understanding of digital accessibility. The book discusses the history of accessible computing, an understanding of why digital accessibility is socially and legally important, and provides both technical details (interface standards, evaluation methods) and legal details (laws, lawsuits, and regulations). The book provides real-world examples throughout, highlighting organizations that are doing an effective job with providing equal access to digital information for people with disabilities. This isn't a book strictly about interface design, nor is it a book strictly about law. For people who are charged with implementing accessible technology and content, this book will serve as a one-stop guide to understanding digital accessibility, offering an overview of current laws, regulations, technical standards, evaluation techniques, as well as best practices and suggestions for implementing solutions and monitoring for compliance. This combination of skills from the three authors-law, technical, and research, with experience in both corporate, government, and educational settings, is unique to this book, and does not exist in any other book about any aspect of IT accessibility. The authors' combination of skills marks a unique and valuable perspective, and provides insider knowledge on current best practices, corporate policies, and technical instructions. Together, we can ensure that the world of digital information is open to all users. * Learn about the societal and organizational benefits of making information technology accessible for people with disabilities* Understand the interface guidelines, accessibility evaluation methods, and compliance monitoring techniques, needed to ensure accessible content and technology. * Understand the various laws and regulations that require accessible technology* Learn from case studies of organizations that are successfully implementing accessibility in their technologies and digital content.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780128006467 20160711
Book
1 online resource (1 volume)
Ensuring Digital Accessibility through Process and Policy provides readers with a must-have resource to digital accessibility from both a technical and policy perspective. Inaccessible digital interfaces and content often lead to forms of societal discrimination that may be illegal under various laws. This book is unique in that it provides a multi-disciplinary understanding of digital accessibility. The book discusses the history of accessible computing, an understanding of why digital accessibility is socially and legally important, and provides both technical details (interface standards, evaluation methods) and legal details (laws, lawsuits, and regulations). The book provides real-world examples throughout, highlighting organizations that are doing an effective job with providing equal access to digital information for people with disabilities. This isn't a book strictly about interface design, nor is it a book strictly about law. For people who are charged with implementing accessible technology and content, this book will serve as a one-stop guide to understanding digital accessibility, offering an overview of current laws, regulations, technical standards, evaluation techniques, as well as best practices and suggestions for implementing solutions and monitoring for compliance. This combination of skills from the three authors-law, technical, and research, with experience in both corporate, government, and educational settings, is unique to this book, and does not exist in any other book about any aspect of IT accessibility. The authors' combination of skills marks a unique and valuable perspective, and provides insider knowledge on current best practices, corporate policies, and technical instructions. Together, we can ensure that the world of digital information is open to all users. * Learn about the societal and organizational benefits of making information technology accessible for people with disabilities* Understand the interface guidelines, accessibility evaluation methods, and compliance monitoring techniques, needed to ensure accessible content and technology. * Understand the various laws and regulations that require accessible technology* Learn from case studies of organizations that are successfully implementing accessibility in their technologies and digital content.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780128006467 20160711
Book
xx, 426 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • About the Authors xvii Acknowledgments xviii Preface xix 1 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Changes in topics of HCI research over time 3 1.2 Shifts in measurement in HCI 5 1.3 Inherent conflicts in HCI 9 1.4 Interdisciplinary nature of HCI research 11 1.5 Communicating your ideas 13 1.6 Research and usability testing 14 2 EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH 19 2.1 Types of behavioral research 20 2.2 Research hypotheses 22 2.2.1 Null hypothesis and alternative hypothesis 23 2.2.2 Dependent and independent variables 25 2.2.3 Typical independent variables in HCI research 25 2.2.4 Typical dependent variables in HCI research 26 2.3 Basics of experimental research 27 2.3.1 Components of an experiment 27 2.3.2 Randomization 28 2.4 Significance tests 30 2.4.1 Why do we need them? 30 2.4.2 Type I and Type II errors 32 2.4.3 Controlling the risks of Type I and Type II errors 34 2.5 Limitations of experimental research 34 3 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN 41 3.1 What needs to be considered when designing experiments? 43 3.2 Determining the basic design structure 44 3.3 Investigating a single independent variable 45 3.3.1 Between-group design and within-group design 46 3.3.2 Choosing the appropriate design approach 49 3.4 Investigating more than one independent variable 53 3.4.1 Factorial design 53 3.4.2 Split-plot design 54 3.4.3 Interaction effects 55 3.5 Reliability of experimental results 57 3.5.1 Random errors 57 3.5.2 Systematic errors 57 3.6 Experimental procedures 63 4 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS 69 4.1 Preparing data for statistical analysis 70 4.1.1 Cleaning up data 70 4.1.2 Coding data 71 4.1.3 Organizing data 73 4.2 Descriptive statistics 73 4.2.1 Measures of central tendency 73 4.2.2 Measures of spread 74 4.3 Comparing means 74 4.4 T tests 76 4.4.1 Independent-samples t test 76 4.4.2 Paired-samples t test 76 4.4.3 Interpretation of t test results 77 4.4.4 Two-tailed t tests and one-tailed t tests 78 4.5 Analysis of variance 78 4.5.1 One-way ANOVA 79 4.5.2 Factorial ANOVA 80 4.5.3 Repeated measures ANOVA 82 4.5.4 ANOVA for split-plot design 83 4.6 Assumptions of t tests and F tests 86 4.7 Identifying relationships 86 4.8 Regression 89 4.9 Nonparametric statistical tests 91 4.9.1 Chi-square test 92 4.9.2 Other non-parametric tests 94 5 SURVEYS 99 5.1 Introduction 100 5.2 Benefits and drawbacks of surveys 101 5.3 Goals and targeted users for survey research 102 5.4 Probabilistic sampling 103 5.4.1 Stratification 105 5.4.2 Response size 106 5.4.3 Errors 106 5.5 Non-probabilistic sampling 107 5.5.1 Demographic data 107 5.5.2 Oversampling 108 5.5.3 Random sampling of usage, not users 109 5.5.4 Self-selected surveys 109 5.5.5 Uninvestigated populations 109 5.6 Developing survey questions 111 5.6.1 Open-ended questions 111 5.6.2 Closed-ended questions 112 5.6.3 Common problems with survey questions 113 5.7 Overall survey structure 113 5.8 Existing surveys 115 5.9 Paper or online surveys? 116 5.10 Testing the survey tool 118 5.11 Response rate 119 5.12 Data analysis 120 6 DIARIES 125 6.1 Introduction 126 6.2 Why do we use diaries in HCI research? 127 6.3 Participants for a diary study 130 6.4 What type of diary? 132 6.4.1 Feedback diary 132 6.4.2 Elicitation diary 133 6.4.3 Hybrid feedback and elicitation diary 134 6.5 Data collection for the diary study 134 6.6 Letting participants know when to record a diary entry 136 6.7 Analysis of diaries 137 7 CASE STUDIES 143 7.1 Introduction 144 7.2 Observing Sara: a case study of a case study 145 7.3 What is a case study? 147 7.3.1 In-depth investigation of a small number of cases 147 7.3.2 Examination in context 147 7.3.3 Multiple data sources 148 7.3.4 Emphasis on qualitative data and analysis 149 7.4 Goals of HCI case studies 150 7.4.1 Exploration 150 7.4.2 Explanation 151 7.4.3 Description 152 7.4.4 Demonstration 154 7.5 Types of case study 156 7.5.1 Intrinsic or instrumental 156 7.5.2 Single case or multiple cases 156 7.5.3 Embedded or holistic 160 7.6 Research questions and hypotheses 161 7.7 Choosing cases 163 7.8 Data collection 164 7.8.1 Data sources and questions 164 7.8.2 Collecting data 165 7.9 Analysis and interpretation 167 7.10 Writing up the study 168 7.11 Informal case studies 170 8 INTERVIEWS AND FOCUS GROUPS 177 8.1 Pros and cons of interviews 178 8.2 Applications of interviews in HCI research 180 8.2.1 Initial exploration 180 8.2.2 Requirements gathering 184 8.2.3 Evaluation and subjective reactions 186 8.3 Who to interview 187 8.4 Interview strategies 189 8.4.1 How much structure? 189 8.4.2 Focused and contextual interviews 191 8.5 Interviews vs focus groups 192 8.6 Types of question 194 8.7 Conducting an interview 197 8.7.1 Preparation 197 8.7.2 Recording the responses 198 8.7.3 During the interview 199 8.8 Electronically mediated interviews and focus groups 203 8.8.1 Telephone 204 8.8.2 Online 204 8.9 Analyzing interview data 206 8.9.1 What to analyze 207 8.9.2 How to analyze 208 8.9.3 Validity 212 8.9.4 Reporting Results 212 9 ETHNOGRAPHY 217 9.1 Introduction 218 9.2 What is ethnography? 219 9.3 Ethnography in HCI 221 9.4 Conducting ethnographic research 224 9.4.1 Selecting a site or group of interest 225 9.4.2 Participating: choosing a role 227 9.4.3 Building relationships 230 9.4.4 Making contact 231 9.4.5 Interviewing, observing, analyzing, repeating, and theorizing 232 9.4.6 Reporting results 236 9.5 Some examples 237 9.5.1 Home settings 237 9.5.2 Work settings 238 9.5.3 Educational settings 239 9.5.4 Ethnographies of mobile and ubiquitous systems 240 9.5.5 Virtual ethnography 241 10 USABILITY TESTING 251 10.1 What is usability testing? 252 10.2 How does usability testing relate to traditional research? 254 10.3 Types of usability testing or usability inspections 256 10.3.1 Expert-based testing 256 10.3.2 Automated usability testing 258 10.4 User-based testing 260 10.4.1 Types of usability testing 260 10.4.2 Stages of usability testing 262 10.4.3 How many users are sufficient? 263 10.4.4 Locations for usability testing 264 10.4.5 Task list 268 10.4.6 Measurement 270 10.4.7 The testing session 271 10.4.8 Making sense of the data 274 10.5 Other variations on usability testing 275 11 ANALYZING QUALITATIVE DATA 281 11.1 Introduction 282 11.2 Stages of qualitative analysis 282 11.3 Grounded theory 283 11.4 Content analysis 285 11.4.1 What is content? 286 11.4.2 Why do we need to collect text or multimedia information? 286 11.4.3 Questions to consider before content analysis 287 11.5 Analyzing text content 289 11.5.1 Procedure 289 11.5.2 Identifying coding categories 290 11.5.3 Coding the text 292 11.5.4 Ensuring high-quality analysis 294 11.6 Analyzing multimedia content 300 12 AUTOMATED DATA COLLECTION METHODS 307 12.1 Exploiting existing tools 308 12.1.1 Web logs 309 12.1.2 Stored application data 315 12.2 Using software to observe and record 317 12.2.1 Web proxies 317 12.2.2 Instrumented software 321 12.2.3 Custom-built software 324 12.2.4 Handling stored data 327 12.2.5 Keystroke and activity loggers 328 12.2.6 Analyzing log files 329 12.3 Hybrid data collection methods 330 12.4 Automated interface evaluation 333 12.5 Challenges of computerized data collection 333 13 MEASURING THE HUMAN 343 13.1 Eye tracking 344 13.2 Physiological tools 350 13.2.1 Physiological data 351 13.2.2 Challenges in data collection and interpretation 356 13.3 Examples of physiological research in HCI 359 14 WORKING WITH HUMAN SUBJECTS 367 14.1 Identifying potential participants 368 14.1.1 Which subjects? 369 14.1.2 How many subjects? 371 14.1.3 Recruiting participants 373 14.2 Care and handling of research participants 376 14.2.1 Protecting participants 376 14.2.2 Informed consent 381 14.2.3 Institutional review boards 384 14.2.4 Potentially deceptive research? 387 14.2.5 General concerns 388 14.3 Online research 389 14.3.1 Appropriate topics for online research 389 14.3.2 Recruiting 389 14.3.3 Study design 391 14.3.4 Ethical concerns 391 14.3.5 Data collection 392 15 WORKING WITH RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS WITH IMPAIRMENTS 399 15.1 Introduction 400 15.2 How many participants? 401 15.2.1 Small sample sizes 401 15.2.2 Distributed research 401 15.2.3 In-depth case studies 402 15.3 Proxy users 403 15.4 Multi-Population Studies 404 15.5 Recruiting users through community partners 405 15.6 Pilot studies 407 15.7 Scheduling users with impairments 408 15.8 Documentation for users with impairments 409 15.8.1 Human subjects forms 409 15.8.2 Research documentation 410 15.9 Differing levels of ability 412 15.10 Bringing extra computer parts 413 15.11 Payment 415 Index 419.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470723371 20160604
A comprehensive research guide for both quantitative and qualitative research methods Written by a team of authorities in human-computer interaction (HCI) and usability, this pedagogical guide walks you through the methods used in HCI and examines what are considered to be appropriate research practices in the field. Featuring a plethora of real-world examples throughout, you'll discover how these methods have been used in HCI research so that you can gain a stronger understanding of the subject matter. Serves as an authoritative, comprehensive resource on all things related to research methods in human-computer interaction Addresses experimental research and design methods, statistical analysis, and time diaries Shares authentic case studies, interviews, and focus group experiences Reviews analyzing qualitative data, working with human subjects, handling automated computer data collection methods, and more If you are looking for a detailed, no-nonsense resource that offers in-depth coverage of HCI methods, then this is the book for you.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470723371 20160604
Engineering Library (Terman)
Book
xvi, 610 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Editor's Note. Preface - Ben Shneiderman. 1. Introduction to Universal Usability - Jonathan Lazar. 2. Designing Searching and Browsing Software for Elementary-Age Children - Hilary Hutchinson, Allison Druin & Benjamin B. Bederson. 3. The Why and How of Senior-Focused Design - Teri O'Connell. 4. Online Redesign of a Web Site's Information Architecture to Improve Accessibility for Users Who are Blind - Vanessa Evers and Hans Hillen. 5. Listening to Choropleth Maps: Interactive Sonification of Geo-Referenced Data For Users With Visual Impairment -Haixia Zhao, Ben Shneiderman & Catherine Plaisant. 6. Improving Screen Readers for Blind Users - Jonathan Lazar & Aaron Allen. 7. Web Fun Central: Online Learning Tools for Individuals with Down Syndrome - Matt Myers, Assadour Kirijian & Sylvie Charland. 8. Using Virtual Peer Technology as an Intervention for Children with Autism - Andrea Tartaro & Justine Cassell. 9. Evidence-based computer-assisted instruction for Autism Spectrum Disorders - Christina Whalen, Brooke Ingersoll, Lars Liden & Sven Liden. 10. Making Software Accessible for Users with Dementia - Norman Alm, Richard Dye, Arlene Astell, Maggie Ellis, Gary Gowans & Jim Campbell. 11. Designing a Cognitive Aid for and with People who have Anterograde Amnesia - Mike Wu, Ron Baecker & Brian Richards. 12. Memories of a Life: A Design Case Study for Alzheimer's Disease - Tira Cohene, Ron Baecker & Elsa Marziali, and Simona Mindy. 13. Interaction Techniques for Users with Spinal Cord Injuries: A Speech Based Solution - Jinjuan Feng and Andrew Sears. 14. Adding Gestural Text Entry to Input Devices for People with Motor Impairments - Jacob Wobbrock & Brad A. Myers. 15. The Creating Community Connections Project: Social and Cultural Approaches for Engaging Low-Income Communities - Randal Pinkett. 16. Implementing Community-Based Participatory Research to Reduce Health and Technology Disparities Among Low Income African-American Women - Diane Maloney-Krischmar, Eleanor Walker, David Bushnell & Sadanand Sirvastava. 17. Evaluating the Usability and Accessibility of an Online Form for Census Data Collection - Elizabeth D. Murphy, Lawrence A. Malakhoff and David A. Coon. 18.Internationalizing Greenstone: A Multi-Lingual Tool for Building Digital Libraries - David M. Nichols, Te Taka Keegan, David Bainbridge, Sally Jo Cunningham, Michael Dewship & Ian H. Witten. 19. Making Universal Access Truly Universal: Looking Towards the Future - Jennifer Preece. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470027271 20160528
"Universal Usability" is the concept of designing computer interfaces that are easy for all users to utilize. It is a concept which many decry as elusive, impossible, or impractical, but this book, which addresses usability issues for a number of diverse user groups, proves that there is no problem in interface design that cannot be solved, or at least improved upon. Individuals with cognitive, motor, and perceptual impairments, as well as older, younger, and economically disadvantaged users, face a variety of complex challenges when interacting with computers. However, with user involvement, good design practice, and thorough testing, computer interfaces can be successfully developed for any user population. This book, featuring key chapters by Human Computer Interaction luminaries such as Jonathan Lazar, Ron Baecker, Allison Druin, Ben Shneiderman, Brad Myers and Jenny Preece, examines innovative and groundbreaking research and practice, and provides a practical overview of a number of successful projects which have addressed a need for these specific user populations.Chapters in this book address topics including age diversity, economic diversity, language diversity, visual impairment, and spinal cord injuries. Several of these trailblazing projects in the book are amongst the first to examine usability issues for users with Down Syndrome, users with Amnesia, users with Autism Spectrum Disorders, and users with Alzheimer's Disease, and coverage extends to projects where multiple categories of needs are addressed. These chapters represent real world projects, being carried out on different continents. The authors of the chapters also represent diversity interface researchers and software developers in university, industrial, and government settings.In the practical spirit of the book, chapter authors provide guidelines and suggestions for those attempting similar projects, as well as implications for different stakeholders such as policymakers, researchers, and designers. Ideal for students of HCI and User Interface Design, and essential reading for usability practitioners, this fascinating collection of real world projects demonstrates that computer interfaces can truly be designed to meet the needs of any category of user.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470027271 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (vi, 293 p. : ill. : ill.
  • Building Education Technology Partnerships-- University/Community Partnerships to Build a K-8 School Network-- Using and Advisory Council to Build Bridges Between an Academic IS Program and the Business Community-- Development of IT/Community Partnerships at a Small Regional University-- Service Learning Partnerships in the Information Systems Curriculum-- Active Learning in Higher Education-- Research Partnerships to Support Rural Communities in Malaysia-- The Role of the Community Technology Access Center and the Network Partnership in Bridging the Digital Divide-- IT/Community Partnerships in an Inner-City University-- Service-Research-- Camfield Estates-MIT-- Theoretical Foundations for Technology Collaborations-- Success Factors for Industry-University Collaboration in a Developing Country-- CyberCamp.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781930708334 20160618
Universities are increasingly being asked to play a greater role in their communities. With the growth of the technology industry and the increasing importance of the Internet in education and everyday life, academic IT departments are beginning to form partnerships with both non-profit and for-profit organizations in the local community. These partnerships can relate to the whole curriculum, to specific classes, to students internships, to theoretical research, and to industrial research, and there are many other possibilities for IT/Community partnerships. Managing IT/Community Partnerships in the 21st Century explores the various possibilities for partnerships between academic IT departments and community-based organizations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781930708334 20160618
Book
xi, 345 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction / Jonathan Lazar and Michael Ashley Stein
  • Standards bodies, access to information technology, and human rights / Judy Brewer
  • Accessible ICTs and the opening of political space for persons with disabilities / Janet E. Lord
  • Web accessibility for people with cognitive disabilities : a legal right? / Peter Blanck
  • Intersection of human rights, social justice, the internet, and accessibility in libraries : access, education, and inclusion / Paul T. Jaeger, Brian Wentz, and John Carlo Bertot
  • Public financing of information technology and human rights for people with disabilities / Deborah Kaplan
  • Using provincial laws to drive a national agenda : connecting human rights and disability rights laws / Ravi Malhotra and Megan A. Rusciano
  • Access to justice / Fredric I. Lederer
  • Open government and digital accessibility / Timothy Elder
  • E-books and human rights / Jim Fruchterman
  • Accessibility and online learning / Mary J. Ziegler and David Sloan
  • Who owns captioning? / Raja Kushalnagar
  • Information privacy and security as a human right for people with disabilities / Jonathan Lazar, Brian Wentz, and Marco Winckler
  • How does inaccessible gaming lead to social exclusion? / Joyram Chakraborty
  • Pivot model of policy entrepreneurship : an application of European ideas in the global South / G. Anthony Giannoumis, Mirriam Nthenge, and Jorge Manhique
  • Accessibility infrastructure and the global South / Joyojeet Pal
  • ICT access, disability human rights, and social inclusion in India / Sanjay S. Jain.
Disability, Human Rights, and Information Technology addresses the global issue of equal access to information and communications technology (ICT) by persons with disabilities. The right to access the same digital content at the same time and at the same cost as people without disabilities is implicit in several human rights instruments and is featured prominently in Articles 9 and 21 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The right to access ICT, moreover, invokes complementary civil and human rights issues: freedom of expression; freedom to information; political participation; civic engagement; inclusive education; the right to access the highest level of scientific and technological information; and participation in social and cultural opportunities. Despite the ready availability and minimal cost of technology to enable people with disabilities to access ICT on an equal footing as consumers without disabilities, prevailing practice around the globe continues to result in their exclusion. Questions and complexities may also arise where technologies advance ahead of existing laws and policies, where legal norms are established but not yet implemented, or where legal rights are defined but clear technical implementations are not yet established. At the intersection of human-computer interaction, disability rights, civil rights, human rights, international development, and public policy, the volume's contributors examine crucial yet underexplored areas, including technology access for people with cognitive impairments, public financing of information technology, accessibility and e-learning, and human rights and social inclusion. Contributors: John Bertot, Peter Blanck, Judy Brewer, Joyram Chakraborty, Tim Elder, Jim Fruchterman, G. Anthony Giannoumis, Paul Jaeger, Sanjay Jain, Deborah Kaplan, Raja Kushalnagar, Jonathan Lazar, Fredric I. Lederer, Janet E. Lord, Ravi Malhotra, Jorge Manhique, Mirriam Nthenge, Joyojeet Pal, Megan A. Rusciano, David Sloan, Michael Ashley Stein, Brian Wentz, Marco Winckler, Mary J. Ziegler.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249231 20170717
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 345 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Standards bodies, access to information technology, and human rights / Judy Brewer
  • Accessible ICTs and the opening of political space for persons with disabilities / Janet E. Lord
  • Web accessibility for people with cognitive disabilities : a legal right? / Peter Blanck
  • Intersection of human rights, social justice, the internet, and accessibility in libraries : access, education, and inclusion / Paul T. Jaeger, Brian Wentz, and John Carlo Bertot
  • Public financing of information technology and human rights for people with disabilities / Deborah Kaplan
  • Using provincial laws to drive a national agenda : connecting human rights and disability rights laws / Ravi Malhotra and Megan A. Rusciano
  • Access to justice / Fredric I. Lederer
  • Open government and digital accessibility / Timothy Elder
  • E-books and human rights / Jim Fruchterman
  • Accessibility and online learning / Mary J. Ziegler and David Sloan
  • Who owns captioning? / Raja Kushalnagar
  • Information privacy and security as a human right for people with disabilities / Jonathan Lazar, Brian Wentz, and Marco Winckler
  • How does inaccessible gaming lead to social exclusion? / Joyram Chakraborty
  • Pivot model of policy entrepreneurship : an application of European ideas in the global South / G. Anthony Giannoumis, Mirriam Nthenge, and Jorge Manhique
  • Accessibility infrastructure and the global South / Joyojeet Pal
  • ICT access, disability human rights, and social inclusion in India / Sanjay S. Jain.
Disability, Human Rights, and Information Technology addresses the global issue of equal access to information and communications technology (ICT) by persons with disabilities. The right to access the same digital content at the same time and at the same cost as people without disabilities is implicit in several human rights instruments and is featured prominently in Articles 9 and 21 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The right to access ICT, moreover, invokes complementary civil and human rights issues: freedom of expression; freedom to information; political participation; civic engagement; inclusive education; the right to access the highest level of scientific and technological information; and participation in social and cultural opportunities. Despite the ready availability and minimal cost of technology to enable people with disabilities to access ICT on an equal footing as consumers without disabilities, prevailing practice around the globe continues to result in their exclusion. Questions and complexities may also arise where technologies advance ahead of existing laws and policies, where legal norms are established but not yet implemented, or where legal rights are defined but clear technical implementations are not yet established. At the intersection of human-computer interaction, disability rights, civil rights, human rights, international development, and public policy, the volume's contributors examine crucial yet underexplored areas, including technology access for people with cognitive impairments, public financing of information technology, accessibility and e-learning, and human rights and social inclusion. Contributors: John Bertot, Peter Blanck, Judy Brewer, Joyram Chakraborty, Tim Elder, Jim Fruchterman, G. Anthony Giannoumis, Paul Jaeger, Sanjay Jain, Deborah Kaplan, Raja Kushalnagar, Jonathan Lazar, Fredric I. Lederer, Janet E. Lord, Ravi Malhotra, Jorge Manhique, Mirriam Nthenge, Joyojeet Pal, Megan A. Rusciano, David Sloan, Michael Ashley Stein, Brian Wentz, Marco Winckler, Mary J. Ziegler.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249231 20170717
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (xvii, 280 pages) : illustrations (some color)
  • Reconciling Usability, Accessibility and Inclusive Design
  • Designing Inclusive Assistive and Rehabilitation Systems
  • Measuring Product Demand and Peoples' Capabilities
  • Designing Cognitive Interaction with Emerging Technologies
  • Designing Inclusive Architecture: Buildings and Spaces
  • User Profiling and Visualising Inclusion.
This book presents the proceedings of the 8th Cambridge Workshop on Universal Access and Assistive Technology (CWUAAT '14), incorporating the 11th Cambridge Workshop on Rehabilitation Robotics, held in Cambridge, England in March 2016. It presents novel and state-of-the-art research from an international group of leaders in the fields of universal access and assistive technology. It explores various issues including the reconciliation of usability, accessibility and inclusive design, the design of inclusive assistive and rehabilitation systems, measuring product demand and human capabilities, data mining and visualizing inclusion, legislation in inclusive design, and situational inclusive interfaces (automotive and aerospace). This book provides an invaluable resource to researchers, postgraduates, design practitioners, therapists and clinical practitioners, as well as design teachers.

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