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Book
xvi, 226 p. ports. 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 226 p. : ports ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 226 p. : ports. ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
340 p. 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
340 p. 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxiii, 745 p. ; ill. ; 26 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 309 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • The law that came before
  • Law on the frontier
  • A Jacksonian jurisprudence
  • Ropes of sand : slavery and state rights
  • Imperia in imperiis : striking a balance of power in the Industrial Age
  • "Absolute common ground" : accomodating diversity in a growing state and nation
  • Crying out for man's hand : law and nature in an instrumentalist age
  • Breaking the procrustean bed : the Progressive Era
  • Great public needs : the New Deal and the rise of labor
  • "Equal in all other respects" : accomodating diversity in the twentieth century
  • Better right than quick : nationalizaing trends in state law, 1940-1980
  • Law in the age of individualism.
A guide to the complex history of state laws and their importance to all Americans State laws affect nearly every aspect of our daily lives-our safety, personal relationships, and business dealings-but receive less scholarly attention than federal laws and courts. Joseph A. Ranney looks at how state laws have evolved and shaped American history, through the lens of the historically influential state of Wisconsin. Organized around periods of social need and turmoil, the book considers the role of states as legal laboratories in establishing American authority west of the Appalachians, in both implementing and limiting Jacksonian reforms and in navigating legal crises before and during the Civil War-including Wisconsin's invocation of sovereignty to defy federal fugitive slave laws. Ranney also surveys judicial revolts, the reforms of the Progressive era, and legislative responses to struggles for civil rights by immigrants, women, Native Americans, and minorities in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Since the 1960s, battles have been fought at the state level over such issues as school vouchers, voting, and abortion rights.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780299312404 20170821
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvii, 245 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
p. 37-54 ; 23 cm.
galenet.galegroup.com for assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 260 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Rescuing Joshua Glover
  • The Fugitive Slave Act
  • The disappearance of Joshua Glover
  • Citizenship and the duty to resist
  • The Wisconsin Supreme Court and the Fugitive Slave Act
  • The Constitution before the people
  • Denouement
  • The ends of history.
On March 11, 1854, the people of Wisconsin prevented agents of the federal government from carrying away the fugitive slave, Joshua Glover. Assembling in mass outside the Milwaukee courthouse, they demanded that the federal officers respect his civil liberties as they would those of any other citizen of the state. When the officers refused, the crowd took matters into its own hands and rescued Joshua Glover. The federal government brought his rescuers to trial, but the Wisconsin Supreme Court intervened and took the bold step of ruling the Fugitive Slave Act unconstitutional. "The Rescue of Joshua Glover" delves into the courtroom trials, political battles, and cultural equivocation precipitated by Joshua Glover's brief, but enormously important, appearance in Wisconsin on the eve of the Civil War. H. Robert Baker articulates the many ways in which this case evoked powerful emotions in antebellum America, just as the stage adaptation of Uncle Tom's Cabin was touring the country and stirring antislavery sentiments. Terribly conflicted about race, Americans struggled mightily with a revolutionary heritage that sanctified liberty but also brooked compromise with slavery. Nevertheless, as "The Rescue of Joshua Glover" demonstrates, they maintained the principle that the people themselves were the last defenders of constitutional liberty, even as Glover's rescue raised troubling questions about citizenship and the place of free blacks in America.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780821416907 20160528
Green Library

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