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Book
vii, 448 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvii, 418 p. ; 27 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
71 p. ; 23 cm.
galenet.galegroup.com for assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 309 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • The law that came before
  • Law on the frontier
  • A Jacksonian jurisprudence
  • Ropes of sand : slavery and state rights
  • Imperia in imperiis : striking a balance of power in the Industrial Age
  • "Absolute common ground" : accomodating diversity in a growing state and nation
  • Crying out for man's hand : law and nature in an instrumentalist age
  • Breaking the procrustean bed : the Progressive Era
  • Great public needs : the New Deal and the rise of labor
  • "Equal in all other respects" : accomodating diversity in the twentieth century
  • Better right than quick : nationalizaing trends in state law, 1940-1980
  • Law in the age of individualism.
A guide to the complex history of state laws and their importance to all Americans State laws affect nearly every aspect of our daily lives-our safety, personal relationships, and business dealings-but receive less scholarly attention than federal laws and courts. Joseph A. Ranney looks at how state laws have evolved and shaped American history, through the lens of the historically influential state of Wisconsin. Organized around periods of social need and turmoil, the book considers the role of states as legal laboratories in establishing American authority west of the Appalachians, in both implementing and limiting Jacksonian reforms and in navigating legal crises before and during the Civil War-including Wisconsin's invocation of sovereignty to defy federal fugitive slave laws. Ranney also surveys judicial revolts, the reforms of the Progressive era, and legislative responses to struggles for civil rights by immigrants, women, Native Americans, and minorities in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Since the 1960s, battles have been fought at the state level over such issues as school vouchers, voting, and abortion rights.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780299312404 20170821
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vi, 87 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Table of Contents 1. Introduction PART I: SOWING THE SEEDS 2. The Limited Definition of Citizenship 3. Abolition and the Right to Self-Determination PART II: CIVIL WAR, RECONSTRUCTION, AND RETRENCHMENT 4. The 1876 Election and the Minor Ruling: Era of Retrenchment PART III: MACHINES, PROGRESSIVES, AND WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE 5. The Progressives: Fighting Fraud, Suppressing Turnout 6. The Suffragettes and the 19th Amendment PART IV: THE TWENTIETH CENTURY AND THE STRUGGLE FOR RECOGNITION 7. The Civil Rights Era 8. The 1970s: Mixed Results Upon Implementation 9. Motor Voter and HAVA PART V: A NEW ERA OF RETRENCHMENT? 10. Empirical Studies of Voting Laws 11. Voter Fraud? 12. The 2012 Laws in the Courts 13. After Shelby County 14. A Return to Expanded Voting? 15. Tightened Voting Laws and Turnout 16. Results 17. Conclusion and Policy Recommendations Bibliography Appendix: Kris Kobach, The Man Behind the Laws.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137492654 20160618
State Voting Laws in America documents changing views on voting rights, emphasizing court rulings which shaped our understanding of what constitutes a legitimate right to vote.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137492654 20160618
Green Library
Book
xlv, 213 p. ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 234 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Legal initial conditions
  • Initial conditions and state political competition
  • The mechanism
  • State courts
  • Legislatures and courts
  • Institutions and outcomes.
Although political and legal institutions are essential to any nation's economic development, the forces that have shaped these institutions are poorly understood. Drawing on rich evidence about the development of the American states from the mid-nineteenth to the late twentieth century, this book documents the mechanisms through which geographical and historical conditions - such as climate, access to water transportation, and early legal systems - impacted political and judicial institutions and economic growth. The book shows how a state's geography and climate influenced whether elites based their wealth in agriculture or trade. States with more occupationally diverse elites in 1860 had greater levels of political competition in their legislature from 1866 to 2000. The book also examines the effects of early legal systems. Because of their colonial history, thirteen states had an operational civil-law legal system prior to statehood. All of these states except Louisiana would later adopt common law. By the late eighteenth century, the two legal systems differed in their balances of power. In civil-law systems, judiciaries were subordinate to legislatures, whereas in common-law systems, the two were more equal. Former civil-law states and common-law states exhibit persistent differences in the structure of their courts, the retention of judges, and judicial budgets. Moreover, changes in court structures, retention procedures, and budgets occur under very different conditions in civil-law and common-law states. "The Evolution of a Nation" illustrates how initial geographical and historical conditions can determine the evolution of political and legal institutions and long-run growth.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691136042 20160606
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 234 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments ix Chapter One: Introduction 1 Chapter Two: Legal Initial Conditions 16 Chapter Three: Initial Conditions and State Political Competition 60 Chapter Four: The Mechanism 92 Chapter Five: State Courts 133 Chapter Six: Legislatures and Courts 169 Chapter Seven: Institutions and Outcomes 192 References 203 Index 223.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691136042 20160606
Although political and legal institutions are essential to any nation's economic development, the forces that have shaped these institutions are poorly understood. Drawing on rich evidence about the development of the American states from the mid-nineteenth to the late twentieth century, this book documents the mechanisms through which geographical and historical conditions - such as climate, access to water transportation, and early legal systems - impacted political and judicial institutions and economic growth. The book shows how a state's geography and climate influenced whether elites based their wealth in agriculture or trade. States with more occupationally diverse elites in 1860 had greater levels of political competition in their legislature from 1866 to 2000. The book also examines the effects of early legal systems. Because of their colonial history, thirteen states had an operational civil-law legal system prior to statehood. All of these states except Louisiana would later adopt common law. By the late eighteenth century, the two legal systems differed in their balances of power. In civil-law systems, judiciaries were subordinate to legislatures, whereas in common-law systems, the two were more equal. Former civil-law states and common-law states exhibit persistent differences in the structure of their courts, the retention of judges, and judicial budgets. Moreover, changes in court structures, retention procedures, and budgets occur under very different conditions in civil-law and common-law states. "The Evolution of a Nation" illustrates how initial geographical and historical conditions can determine the evolution of political and legal institutions and long-run growth.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691136042 20160606
Green Library
Book
xi, 269 p. ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. The emergence of the concept of state neglect, 1867-73-- 3. The civil/social distinction: an intramural Republican debate-- 4. The birth of state action doctrine, 1874-6-- 5. A surviving sectional context, 1876-91-- 6. The Civil Rights Cases and the language of state neglect-- 7. Definitive judicial abandonment and residual expressions, 1896-1909-- 8. A loss of context: the rise of distorted knowledge about state action doctrine-- 9. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521887717 20160602
American constitutional lawyers and legal historians routinely assert that the Supreme Court's state action doctrine halted Reconstruction in its tracks. But it didn't. Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction demolishes the conventional wisdom - and puts a constructive alternative in its place. Pamela Brandwein unveils a lost jurisprudence of rights that provided expansive possibilities for protecting blacks' physical safety and electoral participation, even as it left public accommodation rights undefended. She shows that the Supreme Court supported a Republican coalition and left open ample room for executive and legislative action. Blacks were abandoned, but by the president and Congress, not the Court. Brandwein unites close legal reading of judicial opinions (some hitherto unknown), sustained historical work, the study of political institutions, and the sociology of knowledge. This book explodes tired old debates and will provoke new ones.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521887717 20160602
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 269 p. ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. The emergence of the concept of state neglect, 1867-73-- 3. The civil/social distinction: an intramural Republican debate-- 4. The birth of state action doctrine, 1874-6-- 5. A surviving sectional context, 1876-91-- 6. The Civil Rights Cases and the language of state neglect-- 7. Definitive judicial abandonment and residual expressions, 1896-1909-- 8. A loss of context: the rise of distorted knowledge about state action doctrine-- 9. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521887717 20160602
American constitutional lawyers and legal historians routinely assert that the Supreme Court's state action doctrine halted Reconstruction in its tracks. But it didn't. Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction demolishes the conventional wisdom - and puts a constructive alternative in its place. Pamela Brandwein unveils a lost jurisprudence of rights that provided expansive possibilities for protecting blacks' physical safety and electoral participation, even as it left public accommodation rights undefended. She shows that the Supreme Court supported a Republican coalition and left open ample room for executive and legislative action. Blacks were abandoned, but by the president and Congress, not the Court. Brandwein unites close legal reading of judicial opinions (some hitherto unknown), sustained historical work, the study of political institutions, and the sociology of knowledge. This book explodes tired old debates and will provoke new ones.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521887717 20160602
Green Library

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