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Sound recording
1 audio casssette
Collection
Ruth Asawa papers
Side A: Addie Lanier interviews her mother Ruth Asawa for Noe Valley Voice "Voices of Noe Valley" article ; [15:45] Addie Lanier telephone conversations re: other NVV articles, personal/family. Side B: more interview, mostly re: internment
Book
1 online resource (xviii, 319 pages) : illustrations
  • LIST OF FIGURES ix LIST OF TABLES xi PREFACE xiii ABBREVIATIONS xvii Introduction 1 PROLOGUE: Beyond Civil Rights 13 CHAPTER ONE: Governors and Their Advisers, 1918-1942 16 CHAPTER TWO: The Governed: Japanese Americans and Politics, 1880-1942 40 CHAPTER THREE: Establishing the Structures of Internment, from Limited to Mass Internment, 1942-1943 76 CHAPTER FOUR: The Liberal Democratic Way of Management, 1942-1943 107 CHAPTER FIVE: "Why Awake a Sleeping Lion?" Governance during the Quiet Period, 1943-1944 148 CHAPTER SIX: "Taking Away the Candy": Relocation, the Twilight of the Japanese Empire, and Japanese American Politics, 1944-1945 180 CHAPTER SEVEN: The Long Shadow of Internment 207 EPILOGUE: Toward Human Rights 219 NOTES 223 A NOTE ON SOURCES 295 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 305 INDEX 309.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691138237 20180521
During World War II some 120,000 Japanese Americans were forcibly removed from their homes and detained in concentration camps in several states. These Japanese Americans lost millions of dollars in property and were forced to live in so-called "assembly centers" surrounded by barbed wire fences and armed sentries. In this insightful and groundbreaking work, Brian Hayashi reevaluates the three-year ordeal of interred Japanese Americans. Using previously undiscovered documents, he examines the forces behind the U.S. government's decision to establish internment camps. His conclusion: the motives of government officials and top military brass likely transcended the standard explanations of racism, wartime hysteria, and leadership failure. Among the other surprising factors that played into the decision, Hayashi writes, were land development in the American West and plans for the American occupation of Japan. What was the long-term impact of America's actions? While many historians have explored that question, Hayashi takes a fresh look at how U.S. concentration camps affected not only their victims and American civil liberties, but also people living in locations as diverse as American Indian reservations and northeast Thailand.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691138237 20180521
Book
xvi, 347 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Introduction: relocation, a racial obsession-- Part I. The Reach of American Racism?: 1. Racism and anti-racism-- 2. The ballad of Frankie Seto: winning despite the odds-- 3. Chinese and European origins of the West Coast alien dilemma-- 4. Impact of World War II: a multicausal brief-- 5. The lagging backlash-- 6. The looming Roberts Report-- 7. Races and racism-- Part II. Concentration Camps or Relocation Centers? Definitions versus Historical Realities: 8. Definition versus historical reality: concentration camps in Cuba, South Africa, and the Philippines-- 9. Resistance or cooperation?-- 10. Bowling in Twin Falls - an open-door leave policy-- 11. Daily life: food, labor, sickness, and health-- 12. Wartime attitudes toward relocation-- 13. Family life, personal freedom, and combat fatigue-- 14. Economics and the dust of Nikkei memory-- 15. Consumerism: shopping at Sears-- 16. The leisure revolution: Mary Kagoyama, the sweetheart of Manzanar-- 17. Of horse stalls and modern 'memory' - housing and living conditions-- 18. Politics-- 19. Culture: of Judo and the Jive bombers-- 20. Freedom of religion-- 21. Education, the passion of Dillon Myer-- 22. The right to know, information and the free flow of ideas-- 23. Administrators and administration-- Part III. The Demise of Relocation: 24. Politics of equilibrium - friends and enemies on the outside-- 25. Endgame: termination of the centers-- 26. Conclusion: the place of race-- 27. Appendix: Historians and the Racism and Concentration Camp Puzzles by Zane l. Miller.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781108410397 20180806
In this revisionist history of the United States government relocation of Japanese-American citizens during World War II, Roger W. Lotchin challenges the prevailing notion that racism was the cause of the creation of these centers. After unpacking the origins and meanings of American attitudes toward the Japanese-Americans, Lotchin then shows that Japanese relocation was a consequence of nationalism rather than racism. Lotchin also explores the conditions in the relocation centers and the experiences of those who lived there, with discussions on health, religion, recreation, economics, consumerism, and theater. He honors those affected by uncovering the complexity of how and why their relocation happened, and makes it clear that most Japanese-Americans never went to a relocation center. Written by a specialist in US home front studies, this book will be required reading for scholars and students of the American home front during World War II, Japanese relocation, and the history of Japanese immigrants in America.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781108410397 20180806
Green Library
Book
xxiv, 260 pages : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
Breaking the Silence: Lessons of Democracy from the World War II Honouliuli Internment and POW Camp in HawaiAEi is a collection of articles authored by University of HawaiAEi-West OAEahu faculty from eight different academic disciplines and scholars and community partners from Japanese Cultural Center of HawaiAEi, Densho, King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center, and the National Park Service. The research amassed from oral histories, archival collections, and field work examines the archaeological, historical, sociological, political, psychological, and cultural aspects and impacts of World War II confinement in Honouliuli. The physical remains of Honouliuli Internment and POW Camp still lie hidden deep within a gulch located just a few miles inland from the famed World War II site of Pearl Harbor. That is not all that is hidden. The stories, experiences, and lasting influence of the internment of American civilians and resident aliens of Japanese and Okinawan ancestry, local osuspecto Europeans categorized as oGermanso and oItalians, o as well as POWS of Japanese, Okinawan, Korean, Italian and Filipino origin remain largely unknown and untold. In this special issue of Social Process in HawaiAEi we aim to uncover the facts of the Honouliuli internment and imprisonment experiences and the valuable lessons that can be learned, so that these harrowing injustices might never be repeated again.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780824847333 20160618
Green Library
Book
xviii, 319 p. ; 24 cm.
  • LIST OF FIGURES ix LIST OF TABLES xi PREFACE xiii ABBREVIATIONS xvii Introduction 1 PROLOGUE: Beyond Civil Rights 13 CHAPTER ONE: Governors and Their Advisers, 1918-1942 16 CHAPTER TWO: The Governed: Japanese Americans and Politics, 1880-1942 40 CHAPTER THREE: Establishing the Structures of Internment, from Limited to Mass Internment, 1942-1943 76 CHAPTER FOUR: The Liberal Democratic Way of Management, 1942-1943 107 CHAPTER FIVE: "Why Awake a Sleeping Lion?" Governance during the Quiet Period, 1943-1944 148 CHAPTER SIX: "Taking Away the Candy": Relocation, the Twilight of the Japanese Empire, and Japanese American Politics, 1944-1945 180 CHAPTER SEVEN: The Long Shadow of Internment 207 EPILOGUE: Toward Human Rights 219 NOTES 223 A NOTE ON SOURCES 295 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 305 INDEX 309.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691009452 20160528
During World War II some 120,000 Japanese Americans were forcibly removed from their homes and detained in concentration camps in several states. These Japanese Americans lost millions of dollars in property and were forced to live in so-called "assembly centers" surrounded by barbed wire fences and armed sentries. In this insightful and groundbreaking work, Brian Hayashi reevaluates the three-year ordeal of interred Japanese Americans. Using previously undiscovered documents, he examines the forces behind the U.S. government's decision to establish internment camps. His conclusion: the motives of government officials and top military brass likely transcended the standard explanations of racism, wartime hysteria, and leadership failure. Among the other surprising factors that played into the decision, Hayashi writes, were land development in the American West and plans for the American occupation of Japan. What was the long-term impact of America's actions? While many historians have explored that question, Hayashi takes a fresh look at how U.S. concentration camps affected not only their victims and American civil liberties, but also people living in locations as diverse as American Indian reservations and northeast Thailand.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691009452 20160528
Green Library
Book
xxiii, 439 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
During WW2, the US government suspended due process, rounded up more than 100,000 Japanese and American citizens of Japanese descent, and banished them to prison camps in desert wastelands. They were not charged with any crime, except, of course, being Japanese. This collection of haunting reminiscences, letters, stories, poems, and graphic art gives voice to the powerful emotions with which these victims of wartime hysteria struggled. Included are stories of those outside the camps whose lives were interwoven with those inside.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781890771300 20160528
Hoover Library
Book
xxiii, 439 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
During WW2, the US government suspended due process, rounded up more than 100,000 Japanese and American citizens of Japanese descent, and banished them to prison camps in desert wastelands. They were not charged with any crime, except, of course, being Japanese. This collection of haunting reminiscences, letters, stories, poems, and graphic art gives voice to the powerful emotions with which these victims of wartime hysteria struggled. Included are stories of those outside the camps whose lives were interwoven with those inside.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781890771300 20160528
Green Library
Book
ix, 37 p. ; 28 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 237 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Hoover Library
Book
x, 294 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Video
1 videocassette (30 min.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.
Lise Yasui narrates the ordeal that her family, especially her grandparents, went through at the hands of the USA government and the FBI after Japan and the USA declared war in 1941.
Media & Microtext Center
Book
251 p. ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
31,[2] p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
420 p.
Green Library
Book
v, 192 leaves.
Green Library
Book
iv, 206 leaves.
Green Library
Book
38 leaves ; 28 cm.111
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

19. Justice at war [1983]

Book
xiii, 407 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 467 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)

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