Book
349 pages ; 21 cm
One Hundred Years of Solitude meets The Kite Runner in Saddam Hussein's Iraq. "A contemporary tragedy of epic proportions. No author is better placed than Muhsin Al-Ramli, already a star in the Arabic literary scene, to tell this story. I read it in one sitting". Hassan Blasim, winner of the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize for The Iraqi Christ. On the third day of Ramadan, the village wakes to find the severed heads of nine of its sons stacked in banana crates by the bus stop. One of them belonged to one of the most wanted men in Iraq, known to his friends as Ibrahim the Fated. How did this good and humble man earn the enmity of so many? What did he do to deserve such a death? The answer lies in his lifelong friendship with Abdullah Kafka and Tariq the Befuddled, who each have their own remarkable stories to tell. It lies on the scarred, irradiated battlefields of the Gulf War and in the ashes of a revolution strangled in its cradle. It lies in the steadfast love of his wife and the festering scorn of his daughter. And, above all, it lies behind the locked gates of The President's Gardens, buried alongside the countless victims of a pitiless reign of terror. Translated from the Arabic by Luke Leafgren.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780857056788 20170605
Green Library
Book
349 pages ; 21 cm
One Hundred Years of Solitude meets The Kite Runner in Saddam Hussein's Iraq. "A contemporary tragedy of epic proportions. No author is better placed than Muhsin Al-Ramli, already a star in the Arabic literary scene, to tell this story. I read it in one sitting". Hassan Blasim, winner of the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize for The Iraqi Christ. On the third day of Ramadan, the village wakes to find the severed heads of nine of its sons stacked in banana crates by the bus stop. One of them belonged to one of the most wanted men in Iraq, known to his friends as Ibrahim the Fated. How did this good and humble man earn the enmity of so many? What did he do to deserve such a death? The answer lies in his lifelong friendship with Abdullah Kafka and Tariq the Befuddled, who each have their own remarkable stories to tell. It lies on the scarred, irradiated battlefields of the Gulf War and in the ashes of a revolution strangled in its cradle. It lies in the steadfast love of his wife and the festering scorn of his daughter. And, above all, it lies behind the locked gates of The President's Gardens, buried alongside the countless victims of a pitiless reign of terror. Translated from the Arabic by Luke Leafgren.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780857056788 20170605
Law Library (Crown)

3. L'ombre de Saddam [2015]

Book
315 p. ; 19 cm
  • Le crash -- Fuite en avant -- Un site peut en cacher un autss -- Le collectionneur de mirages -- Tikrit -- La malédiction de Tell Agrab -- Le piège des mirages -- La capture -- La prison d'Abou Ghraib -- La dernière nuit -- La lettre de Bagdad -- Le chaos -- Journal d'Enzo.
"Qu'est-ce qui avait pu entraîner Frank Durand dans les mirages compliqués et dangereux du désert irakien en 1975? Rien ne serait arrivé si l'avion Bagdad-Paris qui transportait sa fiancée irakienne, originaire de Tikrit, ne s'était crashé. Surtout, son chemin n'aurait jamais croisé celui de Saddam Hussein, l'homme fort de Tikrit, le futur tyran au double visage. Dans ce désert où chaque pas est un piège, l'inconsolable fiancé français a également rencontré Rolf, archéologue trafiquant et espion : un engrenage qui a fini par le dépasser et l'a mené jusque dans une geôle de la sinistre prison d'Abou Ghraib. Trente ans après, Frank, qui pensait s'être libéré de son cauchemar, doit affronter de nouveau la malédiction irakienne dans ce pays en proie aux pires aléas de l'histoire. Avec subtilité et précision, entre conte oriental et polar historique, l'auteur, qui est aussi une spécialiste du monde irakien, nous guide dans le dédale chaotique d'un pays attachant et accablant, où s'agite encore l'ombre de Saddam Hussein."--P. [4] of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
246, [1] p. ; 19 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

5. Absent [2005]

Book
vii, 214 p. ; 24 cm.
"Absent" is an affectionate, wry, funny portrait - sometimes darkly so - of the inhabitants of an apartment block in central Baghdad, juxtaposing the days of plenty that Iraq experienced in the 1970s and the tragic state of the country during the period of wars and sanctions. Most of the protagonists are female, highlighting the absence of men in their society as a result of the exceptional conditions it suffers. As sanctions and political unrest intensify, each character must look to their own resources. They barter, bee keep, tell fortunes, collect buttons, and talk. All the characters stumble through in a Dadaesque collage, recounted through an eclectic mix of realistic narrative and surreal hallucinations, while the infrastructure and consequently the social fabric of the community crumble. Transcending its underlying layer of betrayal and mistrust, this is a novel about people's quirks, their enduring emotions, and about survival.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789774249631 20160528
Green Library

6. Saddam city [2004]

Book
130 p. ; 21 cm.
One morning Mustafa Ali Noman, a teacher in Baghdad, is arrested as he reaches the school gates. For the next 15 months he is brutally interrogated, shuttles from prison to prison and barred from contacting his family. The question of guilt or innocence clearly irrelevant, Mustafa must fight to retain a grip on reality. 'How do I know that I am not dreaming this?' he asks. Mahmoud Saeed's devastating novel evokes the works of Kafka, Solzhenitsyn and Elie Wiesel in its account of the wanton and brutal treatment of the Iraqi people by Saddam Hussein's feared secret police. Narrated in a straightforward manner that makes it all the more vivid, the story testifies to the brutal arbitrariness of life under tyranny.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780863563508 20160528
Green Library
Book
ix, 204 p. ; 21 cm.
Mosul, Iraq, in the 1940s is a teeming, multiethnic city where Arabs, Kurds, Assyrians, Jews, Aramaeans, Turkmens, Yazidis, and Syriacs mingle in the ancient souks and alleyways. In these crowded streets, among rich and poor, educated and illiterate, pious and unbelieving, a boy is growing up. Burdened with chores from an early age, and afflicted with an older brother who persecutes him with mindless sadism, the child finds happiness only in stolen moments with his beloved older sister and with friends in the streets. Closest to his heart are three girls, encountered by chance: a Muslim, a Christian, and a Jew. After enriching the boy's life immensely, all three meet tragic fates, leaving a wound in his heart that will not heal. A richly textured portrayal of Iraqi society before the upheavals of the late twentieth century, Saeed's novel depicts a sensitive and loving child assailed by the cruelty of life. Sometimes defeated but never surrendering, he is sustained by his city and its people.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815609919 20160607
Green Library
Book
v, 545 pages ; 21 cm
Green Library
Book
viii, 157 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
"Basrayatha" is a literary tribute by author Mohammed Khudayyir to the city of his birth, Basra, on the Shatt al-Arab waterway in southern Iraq. Just as a city's inhabitants differ from outsiders through their knowledge of its streets as well as its stories, so Khudayyir distinguishes between the real city of Basra and Basrayatha, the imagined city he has created through stories, experiences, and folklore. By turns a memoir, a travelogue, a love letter, and a meditation, "Basrayatha" summons up images of a city long gone. In loving detail, Khudayyir recounts his discovery of his city as a child, as well as past communal banquets, the public baths, the delights of the Muslim day of rest, the city's flea markets and those who frequent them, a country bumpkin's big day in the city, Hollywood films at the local cinema, daily life during the Iran - Iraq War, and the canals and rivers around Basra. Above all, however, the book illuminates the role of the storyteller in creating the cities we inhabit. Evoking the literary modernism of authors like Calvino and Borges, and tinged with nostalgia for a city now disappeared, "Basrayatha" is a masterful tribute to the power of memory and imagination.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789774160646 20160528
Green Library
Book
326 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
307 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
337 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
199 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Green Library
Sound recording
2 sound cassettes (3 hr.) : analog ; Dolby processed.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
358 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library

16. Thirst [2014]

Book
151 pages ; 21 cm
Green Library
Book
184 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

18. Ohrfeige : Roman [2016]

Book
219 pages ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
154 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
60 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Green Library

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