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Book
2, 483 p. ; 20 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
267 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
117 p., [6] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), ports. ; 21 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
x, 200 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 27 cm.
  • Preface-- Foreign Direct Investment and Performance of Japanese Companies of Brazil-- Labour Market Flexibility as a Key Determinant of Foreign Direct Investment: Evidence from the UK-- Intellectual property rights and foreign direct investment: the implications of labour union-- Core Labour Standards and Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America and the Caribbean: Does LAX Enforcement of Labor Standards Attract Investors?-- China's FDI Inflows and Manufacturing Structural Adjustments: Inter-City Competition in the Globalised Delta Economies-- Foreign Direct Investment and Currency Hedging-- Environmental Regulations and the Flow of Foreign Direct Investment: A Review of the Pollution Haven Hypothesis-- FDI and Labour Demand Adjustment to Factor Prices and Demand Shocks in the UK Manufacturing Industry-- On the Relationship between OFDI and China's Economic Standard - Test of the Dunning's Theory of FDI-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781604569216 20160527
Foreign direct investment (FDI) is defined as 'investment made to acquire lasting interest in enterprises operating outside of the economy of the investor'. The FDI relationship consists of a parent enterprise and a foreign affiliate which together form a Multinational corporation (MNC). In order to qualify as FDI the investment must afford the parent enterprise control over its foreign affiliate. The UN defines control in this case as owning 10 percent or more of the ordinary shares or voting power of an incorporated firm or its equivalent for an unincorporated firm; lower ownership shares are known as portfolio investment. Foreign direct investment (FDI) plays an extraordinary and growing role in global business. It can provide a firm with new markets and marketing channels, cheaper production facilities, access to new technology, products, skills and financing. For a host country or the foreign firm which receives the investment, it can provide a source of new technologies, capital, processes, products, organisational technologies and management skills, and as such can provide a strong impetus to economic development. Foreign direct investment, in its classic definition, is defined as a company from one country making a physical investment into building a factory in another country. This book presents the latest thinking in the field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781604569216 20160527
Green Library
Book
163 p. ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
211 p. ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 198 p. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
270 p. ; 25 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
320 p. ; 18 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xxvii, 198 p. 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxvii, 198 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
428 p. 20 cm.
Green Library
Book
244 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
81 p. ; 22 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
102 pages ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
67 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Investments, Foreign; Egypt.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxii, 239 p.
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
Book
65 pages ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
225 p. ; 24 cm.
  • The offshore economy in its contemporary settings
  • State, capital, and the production of offshore
  • The emergence of embryonic forms of offshore
  • The growth of an offshore economy
  • Offshore and the internationalization of the state
  • Offshore and the demise of the nation-state.
Green Library
Book
304 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)

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