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Book
xxvii, 655 pages ; 26 cm
  • Online research methods
  • Designing online research
  • Online data capture and data collection
  • The online survey
  • Digital quantitative analysis
  • Digital text analysis
  • Virtual ethnography
  • Online secondary analysis
  • The future of online research.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (xviii, 189 pages)
Today's librarians need to be technology-savvy information experts who understand how to manage datasets. Demystifying eResearch: A Primer for Librarians prepares librarians for careers that involve eResearch, clearly defining what it is and how it impacts library services and collections, explaining key terms and concepts, and explaining the importance of the field. You will come to understand exactly how the use of networked computing technologies enhances and supports collaboration and innovative methods particularly in scientific research, learn about eResearch library initiatives and best practices, and recognize the professional development opportunities that eResearch offers. This book takes the broad approach to the complex topic of eResearch and how it pertains to the library community, providing an introduction that will be accessible to readers without a background in electronic research. The author presents a conceptual overview of eResearch with real-world examples of electronic research activities to quickly increase your familiarity with eResearch and awareness of the current state of eResearch librarianship.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781610695206 20160618
ebrary Single-user access
Book
1 online resource (vi, 246 p.) : ill.
  • Introduction Why Read This Book? The Book's Underlying Rationale Search Tools Covered in this Book Learning and Critical Thinking: The Essentials Learning and Assessment Basics Essential Learning Components Summary Clarifying What Is Required of You Clarifying the Nature of your Assignment Planning your Assignment Summary Finding High-Quality Information Defining 'Authoritative' Information Information Seeking Summary How to Do a Literature Review Initial Explorations Strategies for Finding High-Quality Academic Sources Summary Information Sources and Search Tools Types of information source Types of search tool Summary Mapping Search Approaches and Techniques to Information Needs Directory-Based Browsing and Searching Topic Similarity Searching Document Similarity Searching Filtering Citation Searching Boolean and Other Advanced Search Engine Operators Summary Scholarly Search Tools in Detail When to Use Which Search Tools Google Scholar SciVerse Scopus Web of Knowledge Incorporating Web of Science Summary Transforming Information into Evidence-Based Arguments Making Information 'Your Own' Critically Evaluating Information Validity, Reliability, Objectivity and Generalisability as Critical Tools Developing Your Own Evidence-Based Arguments Summary Presenting Your Evidence Effectively Plagiarism Citing Your Sources Summary Keeping up to Date A New Document is Published on your Topic Documents in Which You Are Interested Are Cited in a Newly Published Document An Author is Cited by a New Document or Publishes a New Document A New Issue of a Journal in which you are Interested is Published A website in Which You Are Interested is Updated Summary Organizing and Sharing Your Information Mendeley Basics Importing Data from Google Scholar and Other Search Tools Adding PDF Files to Your Library Inserting References into Your Work Summary.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780857023650 20160618
This book will be vital reading for anyone doing research, since using the web to find high quality information is a key research skill. It introduces beginners and experts alike to the most effective techniques for searching the web, assessing and organising information and using it in a range of scenarios from undergraduate essays and projects to PhD research. Nigel Ford shows how using the web poses opportunities and challenges that impact on student research at every level, and he explains the skills needed to navigate the web and use it effectively to produce high quality work. Ford connects online skills to the research process. He helps readers to understand research questions and how to answer them by constructing arguments and presenting evidence in ways that will enhance their impact and credibility. The book includes clear and helpful coverage of beginner and advanced search tools and techniques, as well as the processes of: critically evaluating online information; creating and presenting evidence-based arguments; organizing, storing and sharing information; and, referencing, copyright and plagiarism. As well as providing all the basic techniques students need to find high quality information on the web, this book will help readers use this information effectively in their own research. Nigel Ford is Professor in the University of Sheffield's Information School.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780857023650 20160618
Book
622 p.
  • Acknowledgements Forward: The New Media, the New Meanwhile and the Same Old Stories Steve Jones Introduction Chapter 1: Are Instant Messages Speech? Naomi S. Baron Chapter 2: From MUDs to MMORPGs: The History of Virtual Worlds Dr. Richard A. Bartle Chapter 3: Visual Iconic Patterns of IM Hillary Bays Chapter 4: Research in e-Science and Open Access to Data and Information Matthijs den Besten Paul A. David Ralph Schroeder Towards Information Infrastructure Studies: Ways of Knowing in a Networked Environment Geoffrey C. Bowker, Karen Baker, Florence Millerand, David Ribes Chapter 5: From Reader to Writer: Citizen Journalism as News Produceage Axel Bruns Chapter 6: The Mereology of Digital Copyright Dan L. Burk Chapter 7: Traversing urban social spaces: How online research helps unveil offline practice Julie-Anne Carroll, Marcus Foth, Barbara Adkins Chapter 8: Internet aesthetics Sean Cubitt Chapter 9: After Convergence: YouTube and Remix Culture Anders Fagerjord Chapter 10: The Internet in Latin America Suely Fragoso, Alberto Efendy Maldonado Chapter 11: Web Content Analysis: Expanding the Paradigm Susan C. Herring Chapter 12: The Regulatory Framework for Privacy and Security Janine S. Hiller Chapter 13: Toward Nomadological Cyberinfrastructures Jeremy Hunsinger Chapter 14:Toward a Virtual Town Square in the Era of Web 2.0 Andrea Kavanaugh, Manuel Perez, John Tedesco, William Sanders Chapter 15: 'The Legal Bit's in Russian': Making Sense of Downloaded Music Marjorie D. Kibby Chapter 16:Understanding online (game)worlds Lisbeth Klastrup Chapter 17:Strategy and Structure for Online News Production - Case Studies of CNN and NRK Arne H. Krumsvik Chapter 18: Political Economy, the Internet and FL/OSS Development Robin Mansell, Professor Evangelia Berdou Chapter 19: Intercreativity: Mapping Online Activism Graham Meikle Chapter 20: Strangers and Friends: Collaborative Play in World of Warcraft Bonnie Nardi Justin Harris Chapter 21: Trouble with the Commercial: Internets Theorized and Used Susanna Paasonen Chapter 22: (Dis)Connected: Deleuze's Superject and the Internet David Savat Chapter 23: Internet Reagency: The Implications of a Global Science for Collaboration, Productivity, and Gender Inequity in Less Developed Areas B. Paige Miller , Ricardo Duque, Meredith Anderson, Marcus Ynalvez, Antony Palackal, Dan-Bright Dzorgbo, Paul Mbatia, Wesley Shrum Chapter 24: Language deterioration revisited: The extent and function of English content in a Swedish chat room Malin Sveningsson Elm Chapter 25: Visual Communication in Web Design-analysing visual communication in web design Lisbeth Thorlacius Chapter 26: Feral Hypertext: When Hypertext Literature Escapes Control Jill Walker Rettberg Chapter 27: Campaigning in a Changing Information Environment: the Anti-War and Peace Movement in Britain* Kevin Gillan, Jenny Pickerill and Frank Webster Chapter 28: The possibilities of network sociality Michele Willson Chapter 29: Web Search Studies: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Web Search Engines Michael Zimmer Appendix A: Degree Programs in Internet Research compiled by Rochelle Mazar Appen.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781402097881 20160604
Internet research spans many disciplines. From the computer or information s- ences, through engineering, and to social sciences, humanities and the arts, almost all of our disciplines have made contributions to internet research, whether in the effort to understand the effect of the internet on their area of study, or to investigate the social and political changes related to the internet, or to design and develop so- ware and hardware for the network. The possibility and extent of contributions of internet research vary across disciplines, as do the purposes, methods, and outcomes. Even the epistemological underpinnings differ widely. The internet, then, does not have a discipline of study for itself: It is a ?eld for research (Baym, 2005), an open environment that simultaneously supports many approaches and techniques not otherwise commensurable with each other. There are, of course, some inhibitions that limit explorations in this ?eld: research ethics, disciplinary conventions, local and national norms, customs, laws, borders, and so on. Yet these limits on the int- net as a ?eld for research have not prevented the rapid expansion and exploration of the internet. After nearly two decades of research and scholarship, the limits are a positive contribution, providing bases for discussion and interrogation of the contexts of our research, making internet research better for all. These 'limits, ' challenges that constrain the theoretically limitless space for internet research, create boundaries that give de?nition to the ?eld and provide us with a particular topography that enables research and investigation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781402097881 20160604
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (xix, 243 pages) : illustrations.
  • Introduction: Making Smart Choices on Shifting Ground - Nancy Baym, Annette Markham1. How can qualitative internet researchers define the boundaries of their projects? - Christine Hine, Lori Kendall, danah boyd2. How can researchers make sense of the issues involved in collecting and interpreting online and offline data? - Shani Orgad, Maria Bakardjieva, Radhika Gajjala3. How do various notions of privacy influence decisions in qualitative internet research? - Malin Sveningsson Elm, Elizabeth A. Buchanan, Susannah R. Stern4. How do issues of gender and sexuality influence the structures and processes of qualitative internet research? - Lori Kendall, Jenny Sunden, John Edward Campbell5. How can qualitative researchers produce work that is meaningful across time, space, and culture? - Annette Markham, Elaine Lally, Ramesh Srinivasan6. What constitutes quality in qualitative internet research? - Nancy Baym, Annette Markham.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781452245225 20170925
Internet Inquiry takes readers into the minds of top internet researchers as they discuss how they have worked through critical challenges as they research online social environments. Rather than providing single "how to" answers, this book presents distinctive and divergent viewpoints on how to think about and conduct qualitative internet studies. The various chapters illustrate that good research choices are not random but are deliberate, studied, and internally consistent.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781452245225 20170925
EBSCOhost Access limited to 1 user

6. Researching online [2008]

Book
xxiii, 224 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
viii, 91 p. : ill ; 21 cm.
  • USING THE INTERNET AS A MEDIUM FOR RESEARCH The Data Collection Process Data Collection Opportunities on the Internet Limitations of Internet Data Collection Orientation Organization PRACTICALITIES OF USING THE INTERNET A New Communication Medium Getting Connected to the Internet Online Services Suitable for Data Collection DRAWING SAMPLES ON THE INTERNET Specifying the Target Population Developing a Sample Frame Choosing a Sampling Method Determining the Size of the Sample Implementing Contacting Procedures ADMINISTERING INSTRUMENTS ON THE INTERNET Selecting a Communication Mode Controlling Access Formatting the Instrument Incorporating Stimuli Limiting Item Non-Response Providing Instruction COMPILING RESPONSES ONLINE Inducing Participation Collecting Submissions Authenticating Cases Appraising Responses Concluding Remarks REFERENCES.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780761927105 20160610
The Internet has emerged as a popular medium for collecting data because of its ability to access millions of users, facilitate an array of research designs, and efficiently deliver and compile questionnaires. Often forgotten amidst this growing enthusiasm are the medium's numerous drawbacks, from limited coverage to technical variance, that threaten to undermine the quality of the information assembled. Designed for researchers and students alike, the volume describes how to perform each stage of the data collection process on the Internet, including sampling, instrument design, and administration. Through the use of non-technical prose and illustrations, it details the options available, describes potential dangers in choosing them, and provides guidelines for sidestepping them. In doing so, though, it does not simply reiterate the practices of traditional communication modes, but approaches the Internet as a unique medium that necessitates its own conventions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780761927105 20160610
Business Library
Book
viii, 91 p. ; 22 cm.
  • USING THE INTERNET AS A MEDIUM FOR RESEARCH The Data Collection Process Data Collection Opportunities on the Internet Limitations of Internet Data Collection Orientation Organization PRACTICALITIES OF USING THE INTERNET A New Communication Medium Getting Connected to the Internet Online Services Suitable for Data Collection DRAWING SAMPLES ON THE INTERNET Specifying the Target Population Developing a Sample Frame Choosing a Sampling Method Determining the Size of the Sample Implementing Contacting Procedures ADMINISTERING INSTRUMENTS ON THE INTERNET Selecting a Communication Mode Controlling Access Formatting the Instrument Incorporating Stimuli Limiting Item Non-Response Providing Instruction COMPILING RESPONSES ONLINE Inducing Participation Collecting Submissions Authenticating Cases Appraising Responses Concluding Remarks REFERENCES.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780761927105 20160610
The Internet has emerged as a popular medium for collecting data because of its ability to access millions of users, facilitate an array of research designs, and efficiently deliver and compile questionnaires. Often forgotten amidst this growing enthusiasm are the medium's numerous drawbacks, from limited coverage to technical variance, that threaten to undermine the quality of the information assembled. Designed for researchers and students alike, the volume describes how to perform each stage of the data collection process on the Internet, including sampling, instrument design, and administration. Through the use of non-technical prose and illustrations, it details the options available, describes potential dangers in choosing them, and provides guidelines for sidestepping them. In doing so, though, it does not simply reiterate the practices of traditional communication modes, but approaches the Internet as a unique medium that necessitates its own conventions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780761927105 20160610
Green Library, Education Library (Cubberley), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxii, 490, 79 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.
Green Library
Book
xv, 305 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction / Michael Zimmer & Katharina Kinder-Kurlanda
  • Internet research ethics : twenty years later / Elizabeth Buchanan
  • Challenges
  • Recasting justice for internet and online industry research ethics / Anna Lauren Hoffmann & Anne Jonas
  • A feminist perspective on ethical digital methods / M.E. Luka, Mélanie Millette & Jacqueline Wallace
  • Sorting things out ethically : privacy as a research issue beyond the individual / Tobias Matzner & Carsten Ochs
  • Chasing isis : network power, distributed ethics and responsible social media research / Jonathon Hutchinson, Fiona Martin & Aim Sinpeng
  • Lost umbrellas : bias and the right to be forgotten in social media research / Rebekah Tromble & Daniela Stockmann
  • Bad judgment, bad ethics? validity in computational social media / Cornelius Puschmann
  • To share or not to share : ethical challenges in sharing social media-based research data / Katrin Weller & Katharina Kinder-Kurlanda
  • "We tend to err on the side of caution" : ethical challenges facing canadian research ethics boards when overseeing internet research / Yukari Seko & Stephen P. Lewis
  • Internet research ethics in a non-western context / Soraj Hongladarom
  • Cases
  • Living labs : an ethical challenge for researchers and platform providers / Philipp Schaer
  • Ethics of using online commercial crowdsourcing sites for academic research : the case of amazon's mechanical turk / Matthew Pittman & Kim Sheehan
  • Museum ethnography in the digital age : ethical considerations / Natalia Grincheva
  • Participant anonymity and participant observations : situating the researcher within digital ethnography / James Robson
  • The social age of "it's not a private problem" : case study of ethical and privacy concerns in a digital ethnography of south asian blogs against intimate partner violence / Ishani Mukherjee
  • Studying closed communities on-line : digital methods and ethical considerations beyond informed consent and anonymity / Ylva Hard af Segerstad, Christine Howes, Dick Kasperowsk & Christopher Kullenberg
  • An ethical inquiry about youth suicide prevention using social media mining / Amaia Eskisabel Azpiazu, Rebeca Cerezo-Menéndez & Daniel Gayo-Avello
  • Death, affect and the ethical challenges of outing a griefsquatter / Lisbeth Klastrup
  • Locating locational data in mobile and social media / Lee Humphreys
  • How does it feel to be visualized? : redistributing ethics / David Moats & Jess Perriam
  • Contexts
  • Negotiating consent, compensation, and privacy in internet research : patientslikeme.com as a case study / Robert Douglas Ferguson
  • The ethics of using hacked data : patreon's data hack and academic data standards / Nathaniel Poor
  • The ethics of sensory ethnography : virtual reality fieldwork in zones of conflict / Jeff Shuter & Ben Burroughs
  • Images of faces gleaned from social media in social psychological research on sexual orientation / Patrick Sweeney
  • Twitter research in the disaster context ¿ ethical concerns for working with historical datasets
  • Martina wengenmeir
  • Epilogue: internet research ethics for the social age / Katharina Kinder-Kurlanda & Michael Zimmer
  • Contributor
  • Biographies.
The continuous evolution of internet and related social media technologies and platforms have opened up vast new means for communication, socialization, expression, and collaboration. They also have provided new resources for researchers seeking to explore, observe, and measure human opinions, activities, and interactions. However, those using the internet and social media for research - and those tasked with facilitating and monitoring ethical research such as ethical review boards - are confronted with a continuously expanding set of ethical dilemmas. 'Internet Research Ethics for the Social Age: New Challenges, Cases, and Contexts' directly engages with these discussions and debates, and stimulates new ways to think about - and work towards resolving - the novel ethical dilemmas we face as internet and social media-based research continues to evolve. The chapters in this book - from an esteemed collection of global scholars and researchers - offer extensive reflection about current internet research ethics and suggest some important reframings of well-known concepts such as justice, privacy, consent, and research validity, as well as providing concrete case studies and emerging research contexts to learn from.
Green Library
Book
36 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
xi, 271 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
The realm of the digital offers both new methods of research and new objects of study. Because the digital environment for scholarship is constantly evolving, researchers must sometimes improvise, change their plans, and adapt. These details are often left out of research write-ups, leaving newcomers to the field frustrated when their approaches do not work as expected. Digital Research Confidential offers scholars a chance to learn from their fellow researchers' mistakes -- and their successes. The book -- a follow-up to Eszter Hargittai's widely read Research Confidential -- presents behind-the-scenes, nuts-and-bolts stories of digital research projects, written by established and rising scholars. They discuss such challenges as archiving, Web crawling, crowdsourcing, and confidentiality. They do not shrink from specifics, describing such research hiccups as an ethnographic interview so emotionally draining that afterward the researcher retreated to a bathroom to cry, and the seemingly simple research question about Wikipedia that mushroomed into years of work on millions of data points. Digital Research Confidential will be an essential resource for scholars in every field. ContributorsMegan Sapnar Ankerson, danah boyd, Amy Bruckman, Casey Fiesler, Brooke Foucault Welles, Darren Gergle, Eric Gilbert, Eszter Hargittai, Brent Hecht, Aron Hsiao, Karrie Karahalios, Paul Leonardi, Kurt Luther, Virag Molnar, Christian Sandvig, Aaron Shaw, Michelle Shumate, Matthew Weber.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262029889 20160619
Green Library
Book
p. 138-203.
Book
1 online resource (xvi, 570 p.) : ill.
  • Section I. The Internet as a research medium Chapter 1: The Internet as a research medium: an editorial introduction to the Sage Handbook of Online Research Methods - Ray Lee, Nigel Fielding and Grant Blank Section II. Designing Internet research Chapter 2: The Ethics of Internet research - Rebecca Eynon, Jenny Fry and Ralph Schroeder Chapter 3: Understanding and Managing Legal Issues in Internet Research - Andrew Charlesworth Chapter 4: Research design and tools for Internet research - Claire Hewson and Dianna Laurent Chapter 5: General approaches to data quality and Internet generated data - Karsten Boye Rasmussen Section III. Data capture using the Internet Chapter 6: Middleware for Distributed Data Management - Alvaro A.A. Fernandes Chapter 7: Distilling Digital Traces: Computational social science approaches to studying the Internet - Ted Welser, Marc Smith, Danyel Fisher and Eric Gleave Chapter 8: Analysing Social Networks via the Internet - Bernie Hogan Chapter 9: Nonreactive Data Collection on the Internet - Dietmar Janetzko Section IV. The Internet survey Chapter 10: Overview: online surveys - Vasja Vehovar and Katja Lozar Manfreda Chapter 11: Sampling methods for Web and E-mail Surveys - Ronald Fricker Chapter 12: Internet survey design - Samuel Best and Brian Krueger Chapter 13: Internet survey software tools - Lars Kaczmirek Section V. Virtual ethnography Chapter 14: Overview: Virtual ethnography: modes, varieties, affordances - Christine Hine Chapter 15: Internet-based Interviewing - Henrietta O'Connor, Clare Madge, Robert Shaw, Jane Wellens Chapter 16: Online focus groups - Ted Gaiser Chapter 17: Fieldnotes in public: using blogs for research - Nina Wakeford and Kris Cohen Chapter 18: Research Uses of Multi-user Virtual Environments - Ralph Schroeder and Jeremy Bailenson Chapter 19: Distributed Video Analysis in Social Research - Jon Hindmarsh Section VI. The Internet as an archival resource Chapter 20: The Provision of Access to Quantitative Data for Secondary Analysis - Keith Cole, Louise Corti and Jo Wathan Chapter 21: Secondary Qualitative Analysis using Internet Resources - Patrick Carmichael Chapter 22: Finding and Investigating Geographical Data Online - David Martin, Samantha Cockings and Samuel Leung Chapter 23: Data Mining, Statistical Data Analysis, or Advanced Analytics: Methodology, Implementation, and Applied Techniques - Bert Little and Michael Schucking Chapter 24: Artificial Intelligence and the Internet - Ed Brent Section VII. The future of social research on the Internet Chapter 25: Longitudinal Statistical Modelling on the Grid - Rob Crouchley and Rob Allan Chapter 26: Qualitative e-Social Scienceber-research - Nigel Fielding and Ray Lee Chapter 27: New Cartographies of 'Knowing Capitalism' and the Changing Jurisdictions of Empirical Sociology - Michael Hardey and Roger Burrows Chapter 28: The Internet and the Future of Social Science Research - Mike Fischer, Stephen Lyon and David Zeitlyn (Kent). Chapter 29: Online Research Methods and Social Theory - Grant Blank Section VIII. Glossary of Key Terms.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781446206607 20160618
This handbook is the first to provide comprehensive, up-to-the-minute coverage of contemporary and developing Internet and online social research methods, spanning both quantitative and qualitative research applications. The editors have brought together leading names in the field of online research to give a thoroughly up to date, practical coverage, richly illustrated with examples. The chapters cover both methodological and procedural themes, offering readers a sophisticated treatment of the practice and uses of Internet and online research that is grounded in the principles of research methodology. Beginning with an examination of the significance of the Internet as a research medium, the book goes on to cover research design, data capture, online surveys, virtual ethnography, and the internet as an archival resource, and concludes by looking at potential directions for the future of Internet and online research. The SAGE Handbook of Internet and Online Research Methods will be welcomed by anyone interested in the contemporary practice of computer-mediated research and scholarship. Postgraduates, researchers and methodologists from disciplines across the social sciences will find this an invaluable source of reference.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781446206607 20160618

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