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Book
1 online resource (400 pages) : digital, PDF file(s).
  • Introduction-- 1. Historical framework-- 2. Technological framework-- 3. Theoretical framework-- 4. Agent's responsibility-- 5. Readers' responsibility-- 6. Responsibility of Internet service providers and web-hosting services, part I: rationale and principles-- 7. Responsibility of internet service providers and web-hosting services, part II: applications-- 8. State responsibility-- 9. International responsibility-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107105591 20160618
Terrorism, cyberbullying, child pornography, hate speech, cybercrime: along with unprecedented advancements in productivity and engagement, the Internet has ushered in a space for violent, hateful, and antisocial behavior. How do we, as individuals and as a society, protect against dangerous expressions online? Confronting the Internet's Dark Side is the first book on social responsibility on the Internet. It aims to strike a balance between the free speech principle and the responsibilities of the individual, corporation, state, and the international community. This book brings a global perspective to the analysis of some of the most troubling uses of the Internet. It urges net users, ISPs, and liberal democracies to weigh freedom and security, finding the golden mean between unlimited license and moral responsibility. This judgment is necessary to uphold the very liberal democratic values that gave rise to the Internet and that are threatened by an unbridled use of technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107105591 20160618
Book
320 pages : illustrations ; 18 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Too much world : is the Internet dead? / Hito Steyeri
  • An Internet of things / Keller Easterling
  • Some experiments in art and history / Bruno Latour
  • From the blue planet to Google earth / Ursula K. Heise
  • Notes on the inorganic, part I : accelerations / Gean Moreno
  • Malinche and the end of the world / Franco "Bifo" Berardi
  • Music - immateriality - value / Diedrich Diedrichsen
  • How music takes place : excerpts from "The post-digital manifesto" / Rasmus Fleischer
  • Facebook : a court of ignorant, cruel judges / Jon Rich
  • What is the social in social media / Geert Lovink
  • "I must first apologize..." : in conversation with Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige / Brian Kuan Wood
  • In conversation with Julian Assange / Hans Ulrich Obrist
  • Captives of the Cloud, part III : all tomorrow's clouds / Metahaven
  • The black stack / Benjamin Bratton
  • Cosmogenic acceleration : futurity and ethics / Patricia MacCormack.
Green Library
Book
viii, 249 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Norbert Wiener's vision : the impact of the "automatic age" on our moral lives / Terrell Ward Bynum
  • Beyond copyright : a moral investigation of intellectual property protection in cyberspace / Richard A. Spinello
  • Virtual virtues : reflections on academic integrity in the age of the Internet / Lawrence M. Hinman
  • Enter here - at your own risk : the moral dangers of cyberporn / Susan Dwyer
  • Trust in cyberspace / John Weckert
  • Should we let computers get under our skin? / James H. Moor
  • Hackers and the contested ontology of cyberspace / Helen Nissenbaum
  • Moral imperatives for life in an intercultural global village / Charles Ess
  • Internet ethics : the constructionist values of Homo poieticus / Luciano Floridi and J.W. Sanders
  • The impact of the Internet on our moral condition : do we need a new framework of ethics? / Herman T. Tavani.
Green Library
Book
262 p.
Book
xv, 389 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction-- 1. Historical framework-- 2. Technological framework-- 3. Theoretical framework-- 4. Agent's responsibility-- 5. Readers' responsibility-- 6. Responsibility of Internet service providers and web-hosting services, part I: rationale and principles-- 7. Responsibility of internet service providers and web-hosting services, part II: applications-- 8. State responsibility-- 9. International responsibility-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107105591 20160618
Terrorism, cyberbullying, child pornography, hate speech, cybercrime: along with unprecedented advancements in productivity and engagement, the Internet has ushered in a space for violent, hateful, and antisocial behavior. How do we, as individuals and as a society, protect against dangerous expressions online? Confronting the Internet's Dark Side is the first book on social responsibility on the Internet. It aims to strike a balance between the free speech principle and the responsibilities of the individual, corporation, state, and the international community. This book brings a global perspective to the analysis of some of the most troubling uses of the Internet. It urges net users, ISPs, and liberal democracies to weigh freedom and security, finding the golden mean between unlimited license and moral responsibility. This judgment is necessary to uphold the very liberal democratic values that gave rise to the Internet and that are threatened by an unbridled use of technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107105591 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource Digital: text file.
Business Library
Book
1 online resource (198 pages).
Book
xxix, 167 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Morality, ethics, and digital life
  • Privacy
  • Property
  • Participation
  • Reconnecting the disconnects, correcting the blind spots.
Fresh from a party, a teen posts a photo on Facebook of a friend drinking a beer. A college student repurposes an article from Wikipedia for a paper. A group of players in a multiplayer online game routinely cheat new players by selling them worthless virtual accessories for high prices. In Disconnected, Carrie James examines how young people and the adults in their lives think about these sorts of online dilemmas, describing ethical blind spots and disconnects. Drawing on extensive interviews with young people between the ages of 10 and 25, James describes the nature of their thinking about privacy, property, and participation online. She identifies three ways that young people approach online activities. A teen might practice self-focused thinking, concerned mostly about consequences for herself; moral thinking, concerned about the consequences for people he knows; or ethical thinking, concerned about unknown individuals and larger communities. James finds, among other things, that youth are often blind to moral or ethical concerns about privacy; that attitudes toward property range from "what's theirs is theirs" to "free for all"; that hostile speech can be met with a belief that online content is "just a joke"; and that adults who are consulted about such dilemmas often emphasize personal safety issues over online ethics and citizenship. Considering ways to address the digital ethics gap, James offers a vision of conscientious connectivity, which involves ethical thinking skills but, perhaps more important, is marked by sensitivity to the dilemmas posed by online life, a motivation to wrestle with them, and a sense of moral agency that supports socially positive online actions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262028066 20160617
Green Library
Book
153 p. : col. ill. ; 20 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
142 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction: cyberspace-cyberethics-cybertheology
  • The internet: a new ethics?
  • Cyberethics: new challenges or old problems / Ottmar John
  • Cyberpower: only the power to disturb? / Peter Ferdinand
  • Does digital globalization lead to a global information ethic? / Rafael Capurro
  • Virtual reality and the real world
  • "CyberWars": the invisible struggle for the power of information / Johannes J. Frühbauer
  • Cyborgs: feminist approaches to the cyberworld / Veronika Schlör
  • Negotiating Islam and Muslims in cyberspace / Gary R. Bunt
  • Internet as religious symbol, religious symbols on the internet
  • "Reality sucks": on alienation and cybergnosis / Stef Aupers and Dick Houtman
  • Ritual and new media / Nathan D. Mitchell
  • Becoming queens: bending gender and poverty on the websites of the excluded / Marcella Althaus-Reid
  • Which message is the medium? Concluding remarks on internet, religion and the ethics of mediated connectivity / Erik Borgman and Stephan Van Erp
  • Documentation. "Honour to the dead and a warning to the living" coming to terms with the tsunami / Felix Wilfred.
Green Library
Book
viii, 256 p. : ill.
  • Getting into CMC Learn Basic Theory Critique Central Issues Apply Fieldwork Explore Focus Areas Resource Materials.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781412933636 20160612
This book offers students a task-based introduction to Computer-Mediated Communication and the impact of the internet on social interaction. Divided into four parts which require students to learn, (theory), critique, (current issues), explore, (methods), and reflect, (practice), the book aims to: * Provide a foundation to the social and communicative nature of information and communication technologies * Enable students to engage with the key theoretical issues associated with CMC * Equip students with the necessary research and technical skills as a stimulus to independent enquiry. In spite of the rapidly increasing interest in Internet Studies and CMC and the introduction of many university courses in the area, no specialised, introductory textbook exists. This coursebook responds to the need for such a text. Aimed primarily at communication students, this book would also be useful as a sourcebook for students of media, sociology, psychology and English Language Studies. Companion website resources can be found here: http://faculty.washington.edu/thurlow/cmc/.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781412933636 20160612
Book
vi, 262 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library

14. CyberEthics [2002]

Book
xvi, 260 p. ; 25 cm.
This textbook provides a framework for discussing ethical dilemmas related to today's computer technology and the Internet. Each chapter begins with a case study, based on an actual legal or business scenario. Includes interdisciplinary readings, questions and exercises.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780324116649 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 211 p. ; 24 cm.
The Internet has become one of the most important media for the purposes of communication and information. Salient characteristics of the Internet are its easy accessibility, the relative insignificance of mechanisms of control over the use of the medium, and its global character. These features give rise to complicated ethical questions. These are concerned with the quality of information on the Internet, a just distribution of opportunities to use information on the Internet, privacy, intellectual freedom, property rights, and the impact of the use of the Internet on individual identity and society. Ethics and the Internet contains twelve essays written by outstanding scholars from the United States and Europe specializing in philosophical and legal aspects of modern information and communication technologies. The book tries to anticipate and analyse the developments and to put forward normative proposals for solving the problems involved. The book consists of an introductory essay on general ethical aspects of the Internet, essays on information rights and privacy, on the Open Source Software movement, on data mining and group profiling, on quality of information, and on the impact of the Internet on individual identity and society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789050951760 20160527
Green Library
Book
xv, 305 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction / Michael Zimmer & Katharina Kinder-Kurlanda
  • Internet research ethics : twenty years later / Elizabeth Buchanan
  • Challenges
  • Recasting justice for internet and online industry research ethics / Anna Lauren Hoffmann & Anne Jonas
  • A feminist perspective on ethical digital methods / M.E. Luka, Mélanie Millette & Jacqueline Wallace
  • Sorting things out ethically : privacy as a research issue beyond the individual / Tobias Matzner & Carsten Ochs
  • Chasing isis : network power, distributed ethics and responsible social media research / Jonathon Hutchinson, Fiona Martin & Aim Sinpeng
  • Lost umbrellas : bias and the right to be forgotten in social media research / Rebekah Tromble & Daniela Stockmann
  • Bad judgment, bad ethics? validity in computational social media / Cornelius Puschmann
  • To share or not to share : ethical challenges in sharing social media-based research data / Katrin Weller & Katharina Kinder-Kurlanda
  • "We tend to err on the side of caution" : ethical challenges facing canadian research ethics boards when overseeing internet research / Yukari Seko & Stephen P. Lewis
  • Internet research ethics in a non-western context / Soraj Hongladarom
  • Cases
  • Living labs : an ethical challenge for researchers and platform providers / Philipp Schaer
  • Ethics of using online commercial crowdsourcing sites for academic research : the case of amazon's mechanical turk / Matthew Pittman & Kim Sheehan
  • Museum ethnography in the digital age : ethical considerations / Natalia Grincheva
  • Participant anonymity and participant observations : situating the researcher within digital ethnography / James Robson
  • The social age of "it's not a private problem" : case study of ethical and privacy concerns in a digital ethnography of south asian blogs against intimate partner violence / Ishani Mukherjee
  • Studying closed communities on-line : digital methods and ethical considerations beyond informed consent and anonymity / Ylva Hard af Segerstad, Christine Howes, Dick Kasperowsk & Christopher Kullenberg
  • An ethical inquiry about youth suicide prevention using social media mining / Amaia Eskisabel Azpiazu, Rebeca Cerezo-Menéndez & Daniel Gayo-Avello
  • Death, affect and the ethical challenges of outing a griefsquatter / Lisbeth Klastrup
  • Locating locational data in mobile and social media / Lee Humphreys
  • How does it feel to be visualized? : redistributing ethics / David Moats & Jess Perriam
  • Contexts
  • Negotiating consent, compensation, and privacy in internet research : patientslikeme.com as a case study / Robert Douglas Ferguson
  • The ethics of using hacked data : patreon's data hack and academic data standards / Nathaniel Poor
  • The ethics of sensory ethnography : virtual reality fieldwork in zones of conflict / Jeff Shuter & Ben Burroughs
  • Images of faces gleaned from social media in social psychological research on sexual orientation / Patrick Sweeney
  • Twitter research in the disaster context ¿ ethical concerns for working with historical datasets
  • Martina wengenmeir
  • Epilogue: internet research ethics for the social age / Katharina Kinder-Kurlanda & Michael Zimmer
  • Contributor
  • Biographies.
The continuous evolution of internet and related social media technologies and platforms have opened up vast new means for communication, socialization, expression, and collaboration. They also have provided new resources for researchers seeking to explore, observe, and measure human opinions, activities, and interactions. However, those using the internet and social media for research - and those tasked with facilitating and monitoring ethical research such as ethical review boards - are confronted with a continuously expanding set of ethical dilemmas. 'Internet Research Ethics for the Social Age: New Challenges, Cases, and Contexts' directly engages with these discussions and debates, and stimulates new ways to think about - and work towards resolving - the novel ethical dilemmas we face as internet and social media-based research continues to evolve. The chapters in this book - from an esteemed collection of global scholars and researchers - offer extensive reflection about current internet research ethics and suggest some important reframings of well-known concepts such as justice, privacy, consent, and research validity, as well as providing concrete case studies and emerging research contexts to learn from.
Green Library
Book
x, 224 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Acknowledgements Prologue Chapter 1 The plagiarism continuum Chapter 2 The birth of plagiarism Chapter 3 The six elements of plagiarism Chapter 4 Plagiarism -- a global issue Chapter 5 Plagiarism and the Internet Chapter 6 Teachers' perceptions of plagiarism Chapter 7 Students' perceptions of plagiarism Chapter 8 Plagiarism -- ongoing issues Epilogue References.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415432931 20160528
Written for Higher Education educators, managers and policy-makers, "Plagiarism, the Internet and Student Learning" combines theoretical understandings with a practical model of plagiarism and aims to explain why and how plagiarism developed. It offers a new way to conceptualize plagiarism and provides a framework for professionals dealing with plagiarism in higher education. Sutherland-Smith presents a model of plagiarism, called the plagiarism continuum, which usefully informs discussion and direction of plagiarism management in most educational settings. The model was developed from a cross-disciplinary examination of plagiarism with a particular focus on understanding how educators and students perceive and respond to issues of plagiarism. The evolution of plagiarism, from its birth in Law, to a global issue, poses challenges to international educators in diverse cultural settings.The case studies included are the voices of educators and students discussing the complexity of plagiarism in policy and practice, as well as the tensions between institutional and individual responses. A review of international studies plus qualitative empirical research on plagiarism, conducted in Australia between 2004-2006, explain why it has emerged as a major issue. The book examines current teaching approaches in light of issues surrounding plagiarism, particularly Internet plagiarism. The model affords insight into ways in which teaching and learning approaches can be enhanced to cope with the ever-changing face of plagiarism. This book challenges Higher Education educators, managers and policy-makers to examine their own beliefs and practices in managing the phenomenon of plagiarism in academic writing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415432931 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xiv, 490 pages : illustrations, maps ; 26 cm.
  • Part 1: History and Theoretical Foundation of Information and Computer Ethics 1. Moor, James H., (1985) "What is Computer Ethics?", Metaphilosophy 16.4: 266- 275. 2. Bynum, Terrell Ward, and Simon Rogerson. "Introduction and overview: Global information ethics." Science and engineering ethics 2.2 (1996): 131-136. 3. Tavani, Herman T., (2001) "The State of Computer Ethics as a Philosophical Field of Inquiry: Some Contemporary Perspectives, Future Projections, and Current Resources", Ethics and Information Technology 3.2: 97-108. 4. Bynum, Terrell W., (2010), "Historical Roots of Information Ethics", in Floridi, Luciano, Handbook of Information and Computer Ethics, Cambridge University Press, pp. 20-38. 5. Floridi, Luciano, (2013) "Distributed Morality in an Information Society" Science and engineering ethics 19.3: 727-743. Part 2: Ethics and Computer Artifacts 6. Johnson, Deborah, (2006) "Computer Systems: Moral Entities but not Moral Agents" Ethics and Information Technology 8.4: 195-204. 7. Allen, Colin, Wallach W., Smith I., (2006) "Why Machine Ethics?" Intelligent Systems IEEE 21.4: 12-17. 8. Anderson, Michael, Leigh Anderson, Susan, (2007) "Machine Ethics: Creating an Ethical Intelligent Agent", AI Magazine 28.4: 15-26. 9. Grodzinsky, Frances S., Keith W. Miller, Marty J. Wolf., (2008) "The ethics of designing artificial agents." Ethics and Information Technology 10.2-3: 115-121. 10. Koscher, K.-- Czeskis, A-- Roesner, F.-- Patel, S.-- Kohno, T.-- Checkoway, S.-- McCoy, D.-- Kantor, B.-- Anderson, D.-- Shacham, H.-- Savage, S., "Experimental Security Analysis of a Modern Automobile, " Security and Privacy (SP), 2010 IEEE Symposium on , vol., no., pp.447,462, 16-19 May 2010. 11. Ad Hoc Committee for Responsible Computing (2010). Moral Responsibility for Computing Artifacts: Five Rules, Version 27. https://edocs.uis.edu/kmill2/www/TheRules/ Part 3: Computer Ethics, Privacy, and Anonymity 12. Nissenbaum, Helen, 1998 "Protecting privacy in an information age: The problem of privacy in public" Law and Philosophy 17.5: 559-596. 13. Tavani, Herman T., Frances S. Grodzinsky, (2002) "Cyberstalking, personal privacy, and moral responsibility." Ethics and Information Technology 4.2: 123-132. 14. Yao-Huai, Lu, (2005) "Privacy and data privacy issues in contemporary China." Ethics and Information Technology 7.1: 7-15. 15. Van den Hoven, Jeroen, Pieter E. Vermaas, (2007) "Nano-technology and privacy: on continuous surveillance outside the panopticon." Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32.3: 283-297. 16. Murata, Kiyoshi, and Yohko Orito. "Rethinking the concept of the right to information privacy: a Japanese perspective." Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 6.3 (2008): 233-245. 17. Zimmer, Michael, (2010) "'But the data is already public': on the ethics of research in Facebook." Ethics and information technology 12.4: 313-325. 18. Serracino-Inglott, Philip, (2013) "Is it OK to be an Anonymous?" Ethics & Global Politics 6.4: 217-244. Part 4: Well-Being and the Ethics of Technology Design 19. Weckert, John, (2002) "Lilliputian computer ethics" Metaphilosophy 33.3: 366-375. 20. Reynolds, C. and Picard, R. (2004). Ethical Evaluation of Displays that Adapt to Affect. CyberPsychology and Behavior, 7.6: 662 - 666. 21. Friedman, Batya, Peter H. Kahn Jr, and Alan Borning, (2006) "Value sensitive design and information systems." Human-computer interaction in management information systems: Foundations 5: 348-372. 22. Turilli, Matteo (2007) "Ethical protocols design" Ethics and Information Technology 9.1:49-62. 23. van der Hoven, J. and Manders-Huits, N. (2009) Value-Sensitive Design, in A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology, eds J. K. B. Olsen, S. A. Pedersen and V. F. Hendricks, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK, 477-480. Part 5: Education and Professional ethics 24. Gotterbarn, Donald. "The use and abuse of computer ethics." Journal of Systems and Software 17.1 (1992): 75-80. 25. Anderson, Ronald E., Deborah G. Johnson, Donald Gotterbarn, Judith Perrolle, (1993) "Using the new ACM code of ethics in decision making." Communications of the ACM 36, 2: 98-107. 26. Nissenbaum, Helen, (1994), "Computing and Accountability", Communications of the ACM January 1994: 72-80. 27. Collins, W. R., Miller, K. W., Spielman, B. J., & Wherry, P. (1994), "How good is good enough?: an ethical analysis of software construction and use" Communications of the ACM, 37.1: 81-91. 28. Martin, C. Dianne, and Elaine Yale Weltz, (1999) "From awareness to action: Integrating ethics and social responsibility into the computer science curriculum." ACM SIGCAS Computers and Society 29.2: 6-14. 29. Trauth, Eileen M., (2002) "Odd girl out: an individual differences perspective on women in the IT profession" Information Technology & People 15.2 : 98-118. Part 6: Social interactions and Computer games 30. Brey, Philip, (1999) "The ethics of representation and action in virtual reality." Ethics and Information Technology 1.1: 5-14. 31. Ess, Charles, and Fay Sudweeks. "Culture and Computer-Mediated Communication: Toward New Understandings." Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 11.1 (2005): 179-191. 32. Sicart, Miguel, (2005) "Game, player, ethics: A virtue ethics approach to computer games." International Review of Information Ethics 4.12: 13-18. 33. Himma, Kenneth Einar. "The concept of information overload: A preliminary step in understanding the nature of a harmful information-related condition." Ethics and Information Technology 9.4 (2007): 259-272. 34. Vallor, Shannon, (2010) "Social networking technology and the virtues." Ethics and Information Technology 12.2: 157-170. 35. Taddeo, Mariarosaria, (2012) "Information Warfare: A Philosophical Perspective" Philosophy and Technology 25 (1):105-120.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472431745 20171023
This volume collects key influential papers that have animated the debate about information computer ethics over the past three decades, covering issues such as privacy, online trust, anonymity, values sensitive design, machine ethics, professional conduct and moral responsibility of software developers. These previously published articles have set the tone of the discussion and bringing them together here in one volume provides lecturers and students with a one-stop resource with which to navigate the debate.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472431745 20171023
Green Library
Book
4, 4, 3, 147 pages ; 24 cm.
"中国社会转型焦虑与互联网伦理"所探讨的互联 网上的焦虑情绪, 互联网带来的认知革命, 互联网伦理, 实质上都指向互联网多方治理的可能性和可行性 的探讨.全书的内在逻辑是从'问题'到'思路', 从'认知'到'行动'."中国社会转型焦虑与互联网伦 理"论证始终从宏观和微观层面进行双重关照, 试图从经典理论中找到阐释中国现实问题的营养. "中国社会转型焦虑与互联网伦理"犀利地指出中 国互联网上种种问题之根源.
East Asia Library
Book
xvii, 156 pages ; 23 cm
  • PrefacePart I. Beyond the NSA Debate1. Intelligence Agency Logic2. Double Indifference3. Self-Tracking and Smart Things4. Ecological Data Disaster5. Cold Civil WarPart II. Paradigm Change6. Data-Mining Business7. Social Engineers Without a Cause8. Silent Revolution9. Algorithms10. Absence of TheoryPart III. The Joy of Numbers11. Compulsive Measuring12. The Phenomenology of the Numerable13. Digital Humanities14. Lessing's RejoinderPart IV. Resistances15. God's Eye16. Data Hacks17. On the Right Life in the Wrong OneEpiloguePostfaceNotesIndex.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231177269 20161031
Intelligence services, government administrations, businesses, and a growing majority of the population are hooked on the idea that big data can reveal patterns and correlations in everyday life. Initiated by software engineers and carried out through algorithms, the mining of big data has sparked a silent revolution. But algorithmic analysis and data mining are not simply byproducts of media development or the logical consequences of computation. They are the radicalization of the Enlightenment's quest for knowledge and progress. Data Love argues that the "cold civil war" of big data is taking place not among citizens or between the citizen and government but within each of us. Roberto Simanowski elaborates on the changes data love has brought to the human condition while exploring the entanglements of those who-out of stinginess, convenience, ignorance, narcissism, or passion-contribute to the amassing of ever more data about their lives, leading to the statistical evaluation and individual profiling of their selves. Writing from a philosophical standpoint, Simanowski illustrates the social implications of technological development and retrieves the concepts, events, and cultural artifacts of past centuries to help decode the programming of our present.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231177269 20161031
Green Library

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