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Book
xiii, 118 pages ; 22 cm.
  • Key concepts and why they matter so much today
  • Origins, history and globalization of intellectual property
  • Copyright controversies today
  • Patents and traditional knowledge
  • Trademark, designs and identifiers in question
  • Conclusions and paradoxes.
Formally, ownership of ideas is legally impossible, and can never be globally secured. Yet, in very real and significant ways these limits have been undone. In principle, ideas cannot be owned, yet, undoing the distinction between ideas and tangible manifestations, the distinction which underpins the principle, allows the principle to hold even whilst its meaning is hollowed out. Post-Cold War global network capitalism is premised upon regulatory structures designed to enforce deregulation in global markets and production, but at the same time to enforce global regulation of property and intellectual property in particular. However, this roll-out has not been without resistance and limitations. Globalization, the affordances of digital networks, and contradiction within capitalism itself - between private property and free markets - promote and undo global IP expansion. In this book David and Halbert map the rise of global IP protectionism, debunk the key justifications given for IPRs, dismiss the arguments put forward for global extension and harmonization; and suggest that roll-back, suspension, and even simply the bi-passing of IP in practice offer better solutions for promoting innovation and meeting human needs.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781473915763 20160619
Law Library (Crown)
Book
4, 4, 201 p. ; 20 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
234 pages ; 19 cm.
  • Prefacio: Todos los derechos reservados
  • La revolución inglesa y el nacimiento del copyright
  • La revolución francesa y los derechos de autor
  • De la inquisición a las Cortes de Cádiz
  • El copyright cruza el Atlántico
  • El largo siglo XIX
  • ¿Por qué Marx no habló de copyright?
  • El siglo de la propriedad intelectual
  • La revolución y nosostros que la quisimos tanto
  • ¿No hay alternativa?
  • Adenda: Los copyrights de Marx.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 169 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction-- Culture wars-- Creativity-- Creating self-- Negotiating self-- Creating selves-- Conclusion-- Resources-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754647072 20160527
The concept of creativity, together with concerns over access to creativity and knowledge, are currently the subject of international debate and unprecedented public attention, particularly in the context of international developments in intellectual property laws. Not only are there significant developments at the legal level, with increasing moves towards stronger and harmonised protection for intellectual property, but also there is intense public interest in the concepts of creativity, of authorship, of personality, and of knowledge. In "Creating Selves", the author analyses the construction of creativity within intellectual property laws, addresses strategic responses to intellectual property, and suggests alternative models for encouraging, rewarding, and disseminating creative and innovative output, built upon a critical analysis of and approach to the debate and to the concept of creativity itself. Drawing upon critical theories in authorship, literature, music, the sciences and the arts, the author suggests a radical re-consideration of the notion of creativity in the intellectual property debate and the means by which to encourage and sustain creativity in contemporary society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754647072 20160527
Law Library (Crown)
Book
218 pages ; 23 cm
  • Introduction
  • Relation between intellectual property systems and human rights
  • Human rights law's intersections with intellectual property system
  • Intellectual property system, traditional knowledge and human rights
  • Conclusion.
"The intellectual property regime influences almost every sphere of economic life, having a significant impact on the protection and promotion of human rights. This succinct introduction gives a brief view of the long-standing issue concerning an intellectual property definition, as well as of its historical origins and evolutions, and of its fundamental fields of protection. The author provides a view on the relationship between intellectual property and human rights that have for long been treated in virtual isolation from each other and investigates the fundamental international and regional provisions that have created an intersection between human rights law and intellectual property regimes. The book also includes the most relevant legal instruments on Intellectual Property and Human Rights"-- Back cover.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
92 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 135 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 253 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Why you need to know about intellectual property
  • Ideas and technology
  • The emergence of intellectual property rights
  • Commerce vs. romantic notions of authorship and invention
  • The nineteenth century : technological development and international law
  • The twentieth century : intellectual property rights consolidated
  • The twenty-first century : TRIPS and beyond
  • Forgetting history is not an option.
With intellectual property widely acknowledged today as a key component of economic development, those accused of stealing knowledge and information are also charged with undermining industrial innovation, artistic creativity, and the availability of information itself. How valid are these claims? Has the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property (TRIPs) Agreement ushered in a new, better era? Christopher May and Susan Sell trace the history of social conflict and political machinations surrounding the making of property out of knowledge. Ranging from ancient commerce in Greek poems to present-day controversies about on-line piracy and the availability of AIDS drugs in the poorest countries, May and Sell present intellectual property law as a continuing process in which particular conceptions of rights and duties are institutionalized; each settlement prompts new disputes, policy shifts, and new disputes again. They also examine the post-TRIPs era in the context of this process. Their account of two thousand years of technological advances, legal innovation, and philosophical arguments about the character of knowledge production suggests that the future of intellectual property law will be as contested as its past.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781588263636 20160528
Green Library
Book
534 p. : ill. : 21 cm.
With the rise of the internet and the growing concern over intellectual property, this study provides an open, constructive platform for a wide range of lawyers, artists, journalists, and activists to discuss their views on the future of free and open-source software. By exchanging both complementary and conflicting opinions, the contributors look ahead to the evolution, prospects, and issues of sharing knowledge and ideas through technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789054873785 20160527
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
340 p. ; 30 cm.
  • pt. 1. Framing the IP needs and expectations of traditional knowledge holders
  • pt. 2. Identifying the IP needs and expectations of traditional knowledge holders, results of the nine fact-finding missions
  • pt. 3. Summary, reflections, and conclusions
  • Annexes.
Green Library
Book
xv, 275 p. ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
v, 198 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource.
Stefan Larsson's Conceptions in the Code makes a significant contribution to sociolegal analysis, representing a valuable contribution to conceptual metaphor theory. By utilising the case of copyright in a digital context it explains the role that metaphor plays when the law is dealing with technological change, displaying both conceptual path-dependence as well as what is called non-legislative developments in the law. The overall analysis draws from conceptual studies of "property" in intellectual property. By using Karl Renner's account of property, Larsson demonstrates how the property regime of copyright is the projection of an older regime of control onto a new set of digital social relations. Further, through an analysis of the concept of "copy" in copyright as well as the metaphorical battle of defining the BitTorrent site "The Pirate Bay" in the Swedish court case with its founders, Larsson shows the historical and embodied dependence of digital phenomena in law, and thereby how normative aspects of the source concept also stains the target domain. The book also draws from empirical studies on file sharing and historical expressions of the conceptualisation of law, revealing both the cultural bias of both file sharing and law. Also law is thereby shown to be largely depending on metaphors and embodiment to be reified and understood. The contribution is relevant for the conceptual and regulatory struggles of a multitude of contemporary socio-digital phenomena in addition to copyright and file sharing, including big data and the oft-praised "openness" of digital innovation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190650384 20170206
Book
xi, 254 pages ; 22 cm.
  • How we understand technological and social change
  • Metaphors and norms
  • The embodied law
  • Conceptions of copyright
  • Copies : a metaphoric expansion of copyright
  • Platform, storage or bulletin board? : the Swedish Pirate Bay court case
  • Between form and function in (intellectual) property
  • Conclusions: Conceptions in the code.
Stefan Larsson's Conceptions in the Code makes a significant contribution to sociolegal analysis, representing a valuable contribution to conceptual metaphor theory. By utilising the case of copyright in a digital context it explains the role that metaphor plays when the law is dealing with technological change, displaying both conceptual path-dependence as well as what is called non-legislative developments in the law. The overall analysis draws from conceptual studies of "property" in intellectual property. By using Karl Renner's account of property, Larsson demonstrates how the property regime of copyright is the projection of an older regime of control onto a new set of digital social relations. Further, through an analysis of the concept of "copy" in copyright as well as the metaphorical battle of defining the BitTorrent site "The Pirate Bay" in the Swedish court case with its founders, Larsson shows the historical and embodied dependence of digital phenomena in law, and thereby how normative aspects of the source concept also stains the target domain. The book also draws from empirical studies on file sharing and historical expressions of the conceptualisation of law, revealing both the cultural bias of both file sharing and law. Also law is thereby shown to be largely depending on metaphors and embodiment to be reified and understood. The contribution is relevant for the conceptual and regulatory struggles of a multitude of contemporary socio-digital phenomena in addition to copyright and file sharing, including big data and the oft-praised "openness" of digital innovation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190650384 20170206
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvi, 269 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
In the competing traditions of Marshall McLuhan and Langdon Winner, authors Aaron Barlow and Robert Leston take readers on a revealing tour of the Internet after the explosion of the blogosphere and social media. In the world Beyond the Blogosphere, information has surpassed its limits, the distinction between public and private selves has collapsed, information is more untrustworthy than it ever was before, and technology has exhibited a growth and a desire that may soon exceed human control. As Langdon Winner pointed out long ago, "tools have politics." In an eye-opening journey that navigates the nuances of the cultural impact the internet is having on daily life, Barlow and Leston examine the culture of participation in order to urge others to reconsider the view that the Internet is merely a platform or a set of tools that humans use to suit their own desires. Provocative and engaging, Beyond the Blogosphere stands as a challenge on how to rethink the Internet so that it doesn't out-think us.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780313392870 20160607
Green Library
Book
242 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
  • Sharing - 2 Acknowledgments - 8 Contents - 10 List of Figures - 12 List of Tables - 14 1 Introduction - 16 Setting the scene - 20 2 The Internet and creativity debate - 22 3 The value of non-market sharing - 28 4 Sustainable resources for creative activities - 50 The Creative Contribution - 58 5 Which rights for whom? A choice of models - 60 6 Defining rights and obligations - 80 7 How much? - 90 8 Sustainable financing for the commons - 128 Implementation - 136 9 Organization and complementary policy measures - 138 10 Usage measurement for equitable rewards - 146 11 Clarification and counter-arguments - 158 12 From proposal to reality - 170 Appendixes - 180 A Diversity of attention for beginners - 182 B The total cost of rewards and their distribution - 194 C Modeling usage measurement - 200 Notes - 208 Bibliography - 222 Index - 232.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789048515349 20160614
In the past fifteen years, file sharing of digital cultural works between individuals has been at the center of a number of debates on the future of culture itself. To some, sharing constitutes piracy, to be fought against and eradicated. Others see it as unavoidable, and table proposals to compensate for its harmful effects. Meanwhile, little progress has been made towards addressing the real challenges facing culture in a digital world. "http://oapen.org/search?identifier=409602">Go ahead. Take a copy Sharing is Legitimate An in-depth exploration of digital culture and its dissemination, Sharing: Culture and the Economy in the Internet Age offers a counterpoint to the dominant view that file sharing is piracy, analyzing it rather as the modern form of long recognized rights to share in culture. Sharing starts from a radically different viewpoint, namely that the non-market sharing of digital works is both legitimate and useful. Philippe Aigrain looks at the benefits of file sharing, which allows unknown writers and artists to be appreciated more easily. It supports this premise with empirical research, demonstrating that non-market sharing leads to more diversity in the attention given to various works. New Business Models Concentrating not only on the cultural enrichment caused by widely shared digital media, Sharing also discusses new financing models that would allow works to be shared freely by individuals without aim at profit. Aigrain carefully balances the needs to support and reward creative activity with a suitable respect for the cultural common good and proposes a new interpretation of the digital landscape. Living Book Sharing is also published as a 'living book' on "http://www.sharing-thebook.net">WWW.SHARING-THEBOOK.NET. The author will continuously update the book with the latest developments in the field of digital file sharing. Readers are also invited to join in the discussion and provide updates to the book. Sharing is an Open Access publication and can be distributed under under a Creative Commons (CC BY NC ND) license. This title is available in the OAPEN Library - http://www.oapen.org.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789048515349 20160614
Green Library
Book
242 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • The Internet and creativity debate
  • The value of non-market sharing
  • Sustainable resources for creative activities
  • Which rights for whom? : a choice of models
  • Defining rights and obligations
  • How much?
  • Sustainable financing for the commons
  • Organization and complementary policy measures
  • Usage measurement for equitable rewards
  • Clarification and counter-arguments
  • From proposal to reality.
In the past fifteen years, file sharing of digital cultural works between individuals has been at the center of a number of debates on the future of culture itself. To some, sharing constitutes piracy, to be fought against and eradicated. Others see it as unavoidable, and table proposals to compensate for its harmful effects. Meanwhile, little progress has been made towards addressing the real challenges facing culture in a digital world. "http://oapen.org/search?identifier=409602">Go ahead. Take a copy Sharing is Legitimate An in-depth exploration of digital culture and its dissemination, Sharing: Culture and the Economy in the Internet Age offers a counterpoint to the dominant view that file sharing is piracy, analyzing it rather as the modern form of long recognized rights to share in culture. Sharing starts from a radically different viewpoint, namely that the non-market sharing of digital works is both legitimate and useful. Philippe Aigrain looks at the benefits of file sharing, which allows unknown writers and artists to be appreciated more easily. It supports this premise with empirical research, demonstrating that non-market sharing leads to more diversity in the attention given to various works. New Business Models Concentrating not only on the cultural enrichment caused by widely shared digital media, Sharing also discusses new financing models that would allow works to be shared freely by individuals without aim at profit. Aigrain carefully balances the needs to support and reward creative activity with a suitable respect for the cultural common good and proposes a new interpretation of the digital landscape. Living Book Sharing is also published as a 'living book' on "http://www.sharing-thebook.net">WWW.SHARING-THEBOOK.NET. The author will continuously update the book with the latest developments in the field of digital file sharing. Readers are also invited to join in the discussion and provide updates to the book. Sharing is an Open Access publication and can be distributed under under a Creative Commons (CC BY NC ND) license. This title is available in the OAPEN Library - http://www.oapen.org.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789048515349 20160614
Law Library (Crown)
Book
149 p. ; 20 cm.
Green Library
Book
xi, 308 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Foreword by Howard Rheingold. Introduction. Chapter 1. The Personal Media Revolution. Chapter 2. Now Playing: Hollywood vs. the Digital Freedom Fighters. Chapter 3. Inside the Movie Underground. Chapter 4. When Personal and Mass Media Collide. Chapter 5. Code Warriors. Chapter 6. Cool Toys Hollywood Wants to Ban. Chapter 7. A Nation of Digital Felons. Chapter 8. Personal Broadcasting. Chapter 9. Edge TV. Chapter 10. The Digital Sound of Digital Music. Chapter 11. Channeling Cole Porter. Chapter 12. Architects of Darknet. Chapter 13. Mod Squads: Can Gamers Show Us the Way?. Chapter 14. Remixing the Digital Future. Acknowledgments. Bibliography/Resources. Notes. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780471683346 20160528
"An indispensable primer for those who want to protect their digital rights from the dark forces of big media." --Kara Swisher, author of aol.com The first general interest book by a blogger edited collaboratively by his readers, Darknet reveals how Hollywood's fear of digital piracy is leading to escalating clashes between copyright holders and their customers, who love their TiVo digital video recorders, iPod music players, digital televisions, computers, and other cutting--edge devices. Drawing on unprecedented access to entertainment insiders, technology innovators, and digital provocateurs--including some who play on both sides of the war between digital pirates and entertainment conglomerates--the book shows how entertainment companies are threatening the fundamental freedoms of the digital age.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780471683346 20160528
Green Library
Book
xi, 308 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Foreword by Howard Rheingold. Introduction. Chapter 1. The Personal Media Revolution. Chapter 2. Now Playing: Hollywood vs. the Digital Freedom Fighters. Chapter 3. Inside the Movie Underground. Chapter 4. When Personal and Mass Media Collide. Chapter 5. Code Warriors. Chapter 6. Cool Toys Hollywood Wants to Ban. Chapter 7. A Nation of Digital Felons. Chapter 8. Personal Broadcasting. Chapter 9. Edge TV. Chapter 10. The Digital Sound of Digital Music. Chapter 11. Channeling Cole Porter. Chapter 12. Architects of Darknet. Chapter 13. Mod Squads: Can Gamers Show Us the Way?. Chapter 14. Remixing the Digital Future. Acknowledgments. Bibliography/Resources. Notes. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780471683346 20160528
"An indispensable primer for those who want to protect their digital rights from the dark forces of big media." --Kara Swisher, author of aol.com The first general interest book by a blogger edited collaboratively by his readers, Darknet reveals how Hollywood's fear of digital piracy is leading to escalating clashes between copyright holders and their customers, who love their TiVo digital video recorders, iPod music players, digital televisions, computers, and other cutting--edge devices. Drawing on unprecedented access to entertainment insiders, technology innovators, and digital provocateurs--including some who play on both sides of the war between digital pirates and entertainment conglomerates--the book shows how entertainment companies are threatening the fundamental freedoms of the digital age.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780471683346 20160528
Law Library (Crown)

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