Book
1 online resource (172 p.)
  • Rodolfo Stavenhagen
  • Rights of Indigenous Peoples: A Personal Retrospective of Rodolfo Stavenhagen
  • The Author's Relevant Papers on Indigenous Rights and Other Topics: Selective Bibliography
  • The Author's Key Texts
  • Seven Fallacies About Latin America (1965)
  • Decolonializing Applied Social Sciences (1971)
  • Ethnodevelopment: A Neglected Dimension in Development Thinking (1986)
  • Human Rights and Wrongs: A Place for Anthropologists? (1998)
  • Indigenous Peoples and the State in Latin America: An Ongoing Debate (2000)
  • Building Intercultural Citizenship Through Education: A Human Rights Approach (2006)
  • Making the Declaration Work (2009).
On the occasion of the 80th birthday of Rodolfo Stavenhagen, a distinguished Mexican sociologist and professor emeritus of El Colegio de Mexico, Ursula Oswald Spring (UNAM/CRIM, Mexico) introduces him as a Pioneer on Indigenous Rights due to his research on human rights issues, especially when he served as United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples. First, in a retrospective Stavenhagen reviews his scientific and political work for the rights of indigenous peoples. Seven of his classic texts address Seven Fallacies about Latin America (1965); Decolonializing Applied Social Sciences (1971); Ethnodevelopment: A Neglected Dimension in Development Thinking (1986); Human Rights and Wrongs: A Place for Anthropologists? (1998); Indigenous Peoples and the State in Latin America: An Ongoing Debate (2000); Building Intercultural Citizenship through Education: A Human Rights Approach (2006); and Making the Declaration Work (2006). This volume discusses the emergence of indigenous peoples as new social and political actors at the national level in numerous countries, as well as on the international scene. This book introduces a trilogy of Briefs on Rodolfo Stavenhagen published in the same series Pioneers in Science and Practice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783642341496 20160615
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
Book
xxiv, 232 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
255 pages ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (xxii, 393 p.) : maps.
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
Book
26 p. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xviii, 399 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Tables of Treaties, Cases and Communications-- Affiliation of Contributors-- Introduction by Gudmundur Alfredsson-- Part I Human Rights Instruments & Indigenous Peoples Martin Scheinin Indigenous Peoples' Rights under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights-- Patrick Thornberry The Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, Indigenous Peoples and Caste/Descent-Based Discrimination-- Lee Swepston Indigenous Peoples in International Law and Organizations-- Les Malezer Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues: 'Welcome to the Family of the UN'-- Part II Specific Issues Affecting Indigenous Peoples Joshua Castellino The 'Right' to Land, International Law & Indigenous Peoples-- William A. Schabas Cultural Genocide and the Protection of the Right of Existence of Aboriginal and Indigenous Groups-- Mark Harris '... another box of tjuringas under the bed': The Appropriation of Aboriginal Cultural Property to Benefit Non-Indigenous Interests-- Part III Indigenous Peoples in Domestic Jurisdictions-- Australia Steve Kinnane Indigenous Sustainability: Rights, Obligations, and a CollectiveCommitment to Country-- Canada Alexis P. Kontos Aboriginal Self-Government in Canada: Reconciling Rights to Political Participation and Indigenous Cultural Integrity-- Mexico Alejandro Anaya-Munoz Multicultural Legislation and Indigenous Autonomy in Oaxaca, Mexico-- Nicaragua Christina Binder The Case of the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua: The Awas Tingni Case, or Realizing that a Good Legal System of Protection of Land Rights Is No Guarantee of Effective Implementation-- India Jeremine Gilbert The Blur of a Distinction: Adivasis Experience with Land Rights, Self-Rule and Autonomy-- Bangladesh Faustina Pereira The Chittagong Hill Tracts Peace Accord and the Long Road to Peace: A Case Study-- Nigeria Kwadwo Appiagyei-Atua Self-Determination v. State Sovereignty: A Critique of the African Commission's Decision in the Ogoni Case-- South Africa Vinodh Jaichand Self-Determination and Minority Rights in South Africa-- Kenya Albert K. Barume Indigenous Battling for Land Rights: The Case of the Ogiek of Kenya-- Part IV Conclusion-- Joshua Castellino and Niamh Walsh Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004143364 20160605
This volume highlights those instances in the work of international organizations where advances have been made concerning indigenous rights. It also devotes attention to the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, to the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, and to a number of thematic issues in the field. The human rights situations facing indigenous peoples in Australia, Bangladesh, Canada, India, Kenya, Mexico, Nicaragua, Nigeria and South Africa are dealt with in separate chapters.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004143364 20160605
Book
xi, 396 p. ; 25 cm.
In this revised and updated edition, Anaya incorporates references to all the latest treaties and recent developments in international law's treatment of indigenous peoples. He also discusses a new generation of international treaties that may be capable of implementing international norms concerning indigenous peoples.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195173499 20160527
In this thoroughly revised and updated edition, Anaya incorporates references to all the latest treaties and recent developments in international law's treatment of indigenous people. Anaya provides new evidence to support the claim that while historical trends in international law facilitated the colonization of indigenous peoples and their lands, modern international law's human rights program has been responsive to indigenous peoples' aspirations to survive as distinct communities in control of their own destinies. Against this historical backdrop, James Anaya discusses a new generation of international treaties that may be capable of implementing international norms concerning indigenous peoples.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195173505 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 258 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Acknowledgements-- Introduction-- 1. Bringing 'peoples' into international society-- 2. Wild 'men' and other tales-- 3. Dispossession and the purposes of international law-- 4. Recovering rights: land, self-determination and sovereignty-- 5. The political and moral legacy of conquest-- 6. Dealing with difference-- Conclusion-- Appendix-- Select bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521824712 20160528
Paul Keal examines the historical role of international law and political theory in justifying the dispossession of indigenous peoples as part of the expansion of international society. He argues that, paradoxically, law and political theory can now underpin the recovery of indigenous rights. At the heart of contemporary struggles is the core right of self-determination, and Keal argues for recognition of indigenous peoples as 'peoples' with the right of self-determination in constitutional and international law, and for adoption of the Draft Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples by the General Assembly. He asks whether the theory of international society can accommodate indigenous peoples and considers the political arrangements needed for states to satisfy indigenous claims. The book also questions the moral legitimacy of international society and examines notions of collective guilt and responsibility.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521824712 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 258 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Acknowledgements-- Introduction-- 1. Bringing 'peoples' into international society-- 2. Wild 'men' and other tales-- 3. Dispossession and the purposes of international law-- 4. Recovering rights: land, self-determination and sovereignty-- 5. The political and moral legacy of conquest-- 6. Dealing with difference-- Conclusion-- Appendix-- Select bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521824712 20160528
Paul Keal examines the historical role of international law and political theory in justifying the dispossession of indigenous peoples as part of the expansion of international society. He argues that, paradoxically, law and political theory can now underpin the recovery of indigenous rights. At the heart of contemporary struggles is the core right of self-determination, and Keal argues for recognition of indigenous peoples as 'peoples' with the right of self-determination in constitutional and international law, and for adoption of the Draft Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples by the General Assembly. He asks whether the theory of international society can accommodate indigenous peoples and considers the political arrangements needed for states to satisfy indigenous claims. The book also questions the moral legitimacy of international society and examines notions of collective guilt and responsibility.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521824712 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxi, 483 p. ; 26 cm.
  • Historical antecedents and their contemporary significance: Greg Marks, indigenous peoples in international law - the significance of Francisco de Vitoria and Bartolome de las Casas-- Douglas Sanders, the re-emergence of indigenous questions in international law. The argument for recognition of indigenous sovereignty on the basis of established modern principles: Darlene M. Johnston, the quest of the Six Nations Confederacy for self-determination-- John Howard Clinebell, Jim Thomson, sovereignty and self-determination - the rights of native Americans under international law. The dynamics and challenges of the contemporary international indigenous rights movement: Robert A. Williams, Jr, encounters on the frontiers of international human rights law - redefining the terms of indigenous peoples' survival in the world-- Benedict Kingsbury, 'indigenous peoples' in international law - a constructivist approach to the Asian controversy. The emergence and contours of a new indigenous rights regime: Siegfried Wiessner, the rights of indigenous peoples - a global and comparative international legal analysis-- Lee Swepston, a new step in the international law on indigenous and tribal peoples - ILO Convention Number 169 of 1989-- Erica-Irene Daes, some considerations on the right of indigenous peoples to self-determination. Invoking the contemporary indigenous rights regime - two examples: Gillian Triggs, Australia's indigenous peoples and international law - validity of the Native Title Amendment Act 1998-- S. James Anaya, the native Hawaiian people and international human rights law - toward a remedy for past and continuing wrongs.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754621621 20160527
This series brings together a collection of journal articles in international law. In addition each volume contains an informative introduction which provides an overview of the subject matter and justification of why the articles were collected. The series contains collections of articles in a manner that is of use for both teaching and research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754621621 20160527
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 267 p. ; 24 cm.
In Indigenous Peoples in International Law, James Anaya explores the development and contours of international law as it concerns the world's indigenous peoples, culturally distinctive groups that are descended from the original inhabitants of lands now dominated by others. Anaya demonstrates that, while historical trends in international law largely facilitated the colonization of indigenous peoples and their lands, modern international law's human rights program has been responsive to indigenous peoples' aspirations to survive as distinct communities in control of their own destinies. Over the last several years, the international system - particularly as embodied in the United Nations and other international institutions - has exhibited a renewed and increasingly heightened focus on the concerns of indigenous peoples. Anaya discusses the resulting new generation of international treaty and customary norms, while linking the new and emergent norms with previously existing international human rights standards of general applicability. Anaya further identifies and analyses institutions and procedures, at both the domestic and international levels, for implementing international norms concerning indigenous peoples.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195140453 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxxiii, 193 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
228 p. ; 23 cm.
Traces the development of international law beginning in the middle ages with the "doctrine of discovery.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780919441668 20160527
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 311 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 267 p. ; 25 cm.
In this book, Anaya presents an integrated overview of the historical, contemporary, and emerging international law related to indigenous peoples. This book will provide policy-makers with a theoretically based practical overview of the international law in the field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195086201 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 262 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • From this day forward / Rigoberta Menchú Tum
  • An international agenda / Julian Burger
  • Burma's ethnic minority women : from abuse to resistance / Edith T. Mirante
  • The war in Bosnia : seeds of wars to come / Anthony Borden
  • Death of a people : logging in the Penan homeland / Wade Davis
  • The Ju/'hoan Bushmen : indigenous rights in a new country / Megan Biesele
  • War of the rices / Winona LaDuke
  • Ethiopia's uncertain future : the potential of ethnic politics / Herbert S. Lewis
  • Securing a homeland : the Tawahka Sumu of Mosquitia's rain forest / Peter H. Herlihy
  • Looking back to go forward : predicting and preventing human rights violations / Jason W. Clay.
Green Library
Book
x, 262 p. : ill. map ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
262 p.
Green Library
Book
97 p. ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)

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