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Book
2, 4, 308 p., [4] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 21 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
226 p. 28 cm.
Hoover Library
Book
111 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Green Library
Book
229 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
[4] p. ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Book
283 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
  • Author biographies Introduction - Sita Venkateswar, Emma Hughes, Chris Kidd, Justin Kenrick, Benno Glauser, Hine Waitere, Katherine McKinnon, Simron Jit Singh Invocation: What the spirit said to Ibegua Chiquenoro - translated by Benno Glauser Section One: Settler South America 1. Being indigenous. An inquiry into the concept of indigeneity, surging from a conversation with two Ayoreo leaders - Benno Glauser New Zealand 2. Beyond indigenous civilities: indigenous matters - Hine Waitere and Elizabeth Allen Section Two: Postcolonial Africa 3. Mapping Everyday Practices as Rights of Resistance: Indigenous peoples in Central Africa - Christopher Kidd and Justin Kenrick 4. Displacement and indigenous rights: the Nubian Case - Emma Hughes Asia 5. Being indigenous in northern Thailand - Katharine McKinnon 6. Chupon's dilemma. A dialogue - Simron Jit Singh Section Three: The International Arena 7. Indigeneity and International Indigenous Rights Organisations and Fora - Sita Venkateswar Conclusion: Naming and Claiming Second-Wave Indigeneity: a dialogue and reflections - Sita Venkateswar, Hine Waitere, Chris Kidd, Avril Bell, Benno Glauser, Katherine Mackinnon, Emma Hughes, Simron Jit Singh.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780321219 20160607
Provocative and original, The Politics of Indigeneity explores the concept of indigeneity across the world - from the Americas to New Zealand, Africa to Asia - and the ways in which it intersects with local, national and international social and political realities. Taking on the role of critical interlocutors, the authors engage in extended dialogue with indigenous spokespersons and activists, as well as between each other. In doing so, they explore the possibilities of a 'second-wave indigeneity' - one that is alert to the challenges posed to indigenous aspirations by the neo-liberal agenda of nation-states and their concerns with sovereignty. Timely and topical in its focus on global indigenous politics, and featuring a variety of first-hand indigenous voices - including those of indigenous activists, scholars, leaders and interviewees - this is a vital contribution to an often contentious topic.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780321219 20160607
Green Library
Video
1 online resource (58 min.).
In many indigenous cultures one question keeps demanding attention: Can we survive in the modern world and should we? This film takes a closer look into this question from the viewpoint of four different indigenous peoples.
Journal/Periodical
v. ; 30 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 205 pages : illustrations, maps ; 21 cm
East Asia Library
Book
xviii, 278 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Address by the Governor General of Canada / His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston
  • Address by the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development / the Honourable Bernard Valcourt
  • Royal Proclamation of 1763 and the aboriginal Constitution / Brian Slattery
  • Proclamation of 1763 : Indian country origins and American impacts / Colin G. Calloway
  • Aboriginal Charter of Rights : the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and the Constitution of Canada / Mark D. Walters
  • Impact of the Royal Proclamation of 1763 on Quebec : then and now / Ghislain Otis
  • Canada's historic treaties / J.R. Miller
  • Negotiation and implementation of modern treaties between aboriginal peoples and the Crown in right of Canada / Terry Fenge
  • 1998 Nisga'a Treaty / Jim Aldridge
  • Cree experience with treaty implementation / Matthew Coon Come
  • Alaska and Canadian land claim settlements / Alastair Campbell
  • In conclusion / Terry Fenge and Jim Aldridge
  • Royal Proclamation of 7 October 1763
  • 1913 Nishga Nation Petition to His Majesty's Privy Council.
In 1763 King George III of Great Britain, victorious in the Seven Years War with France, issued a proclamation to organize the governance of territory newly acquired by the Crown in North America and the Caribbean. The proclamation reserved land west of the Appalachian Mountains for Indians, and required the Crown to purchase Indian land through treaties, negotiated without coercion and in public, before issuing rights to newcomers to use and settle on the land. Marking its 250th anniversary Keeping Promises shows how central the application of the Proclamation is to the many treaties that followed it and the settlement and development of Canada. Promises have been made to Aboriginal peoples in historic treaties from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries in Ontario, the Prairies, and the Mackenzie Valley, and in modern treaties from the 1970s onward, primarily in the North. In this collection, essays by historians, lawyers, treaty negotiators, and Aboriginal leaders explore how and how well these treaties are executed. Addresses by the governor general of Canada and the federal minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development are also included. In 2003 Aboriginal leaders formed the Land Claims Agreements Coalition to make sure that treaties - building blocks of Canada - are fully implemented. Unique in breadth and scope, Keeping Promises is a testament to the research, advocacy, solidarity, and accomplishments of this coalition and those holding the Crown to its commitments.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780773545878 20161003
Law Library (Crown)
Book
65 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxii, 184 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • The legal content of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
  • The legal status of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
  • The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the human rights struggles of other groups in international law
  • The political power of the global indigenous movement
  • Two distinguishing features of the human rights claims of indigenous peoples
  • Conclusions.
Today human rights represent a primary concern of the international legal system. The international community's commitment to the protection and promotion of human rights, however, does not always produce the results hoped for by the advocates of a more justice-oriented system of international law. Indeed international law is often criticised for, inter alia, its enduring imperial character, incapacity to minimize inequalities and failure to take human suffering seriously. Against this background, the central question that this book aims to answer is whether the adoption of the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples points to the existence of an international law that promises to provide valid responses to the demands for justice of disempowered and vulnerable groups. At one level, the book assesses whether international law has responded fairly and adequately to the human rights claims of indigenous peoples. At another level, it explores the relationship between this response and some distinctive features of the indigenous peoples' struggle for justice, reflecting on the extent to which the latter have influenced and shaped the former. The book draws important conclusions as to the reasons behind international law's positive recognition of indigenous peoples' rights, shedding some light on the potential and limits of international law as an instrument of justice. The book will be of great interest to students and scholars of public international law, human rights and social movements.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138017962 20160802
Law Library (Crown)
Book
390 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
191 p. incl. tables. 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 423 pages : 2 color maps ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
xlvii, 636 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
Most of the papers here emerged from various processes that Tebtebba organized and from the recently held International Expert Group Meeting on Indigenous People's Development with culture and Identity organized by the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. Some of the papers featured in this book started out as presentations in the project "Operationalizing the Human-Rights Based Approach for the Protection and Enhancement of Biodiversity and Cultural Diversity amongst Indigenous Peoples, ' which convened indigenous thinkers, academics, practitioners and activists, with some support group, NGOs, intergovernmental organizations, donors and academics. Paper from other workshops and meetings about indigenous peoples and development are also included.
Green Library
Book
143 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
236 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
347 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
144 p. : ill., map ; 18 cm.
Indigenous peoples have long suffered from exoticization. Outsiders elevate their beauty, remoteness and difference and do not see beyond this to the real problems they face. The No-Nonsense Guide to Indigenous Peoples looks beyond the exotic images, tracing the stories of different indigenous peoples from their first (and often fatal) contact with explorers and colonizers. Much of this history is told here by indigenous people themselves. They vividly describe why land and the natural world are so special to them; how it feels to be snatched from your family as a child because the government wants to "make you white"; why they are demanding that museums must return the bones of their ancestors; how can they retain their traditional culture while moving with the times; and what kinds of development are positive. This short guide discusses all this and more, raising countless issues for debate.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781859844380 20160527
Green Library

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