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Book
xii, 272 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
x, 221 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: work, family, and reproductive technologies
  • Questions in the abstract: assisted reproductive technologies as private choice and social practice
  • Resolve: an advocate and forum for the infertile
  • Public discussions of infertility: community norms in one group's quest
  • Contributions from ethics: gender, consumerism, and challenges to the ethos of neutrality
  • Lessons from experience: meaning making and the limits of assisted reproductive technologies
  • Conclusion.
Combining attention to lived experience with the critical tools of ethics, Karey Harwood explores why many women who use the tools of high-tech assisted reproduction tend to use them repeatedly, even when the results are unsuccessful. With a compassionate look at the individual decision making behind the desire to become pregnant and the use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART), Harwood extends the public conversation beyond debates about individual choice by considering the experiences of families and by addressing the broader ethical problems presented by these technologies. Incorporating the personal narratives of women who are members of RESOLVE, the nation's leading organization for people who are infertile, Harwood demonstrates that repeated unsuccessful attempts to use ART may ironically help women come to terms with their infertility. Yet ART is problematic for a number of reasons, including the financial, physical, and emotional costs for women and their families as well as the effects of these technologies on the health and well-being of the children conceived. Issues such as consumerism, workplace norms that encourage delayed childbearing, and narrow definitions of family all come into play. By considering both emotional and ethical dimensions, Harwood offers a humanistic account of infertility and its resolution in a twenty-first-century American context.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807831571 20160528
Green Library
Book
258 p.
With technological advances in reproduction no longer confined to the laboratory or involving only the isolated individual, women and men are increasingly resorting to a variety of technologies unheard of a few decades ago to assist them in becoming parents. The public at large, and feminists as a group, are confused and divided over how to view these technologies and over what positions to take on the moral and legal dilemmas. The Other Machine provides a rigorous analysis of contemporary feminist debates.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415912785 20160527
Green Library
Book
22 p. ; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
227 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction -- 1. From Walking Wombs to Test-Tube Babies: Ann Oakley-- Thomas Coram Research Unit. -- 2. New Techniques and Old Controversies (the focus of public concern over AID and IVF): Naomi Pfeffer-- University of Essex. -- 3. Infertility and Health Care for Women: Lesley Doyal-- North London Polytechnic. -- 4. Surrogacy: Juliette Zipper-- University of Amsterdam and Selma Sevenhuijsen-- University of Amsterdam. -- 5. Fetal Images: Ultrasound and Reproductive Consciousness: Rosalind Petchesky-- Bryn Mawr College. -- 6. Paternity and Maternity: Carol Smart-- University of Warwick. -- 7. Embryo Rights and Reproductive Rights: Janet Gallagher-- Hampshire College. -- 8. Deconstruction of Motherhood: Michelle Stanworth, Cambridge College of Arts and Technology. -- 9. Victorian Values in the Test-Tube: Science and Women's Subordination: Hilary Rose-- University of Bradford.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780745602080 20160527
The creation of "test-tube babies" acted as a spur to public debate about the implications of research on embryos, in vitro fertilization, surrogate motherhood, and the whole range of technologies concerned with human reproduction. The scope of reproductive technologies examined in this volume - from techniques for the medical "management" of childbirth, to genetic engineering - is such that few women in the western world, and smaller and smaller numbers in the third world, escape their influence. What then is their impact: on the process of reproduction, on family life and particularly on women? This book comprises a remarkable collection of original essays which attempts to place the current controversy over reproductive technologies in a political, legal and economic context. Contributors, who include Lesley Doyal, Ann Oakley, Ros Petchesky, Carol Smart, Hilary Rose and Naomi Pfeffer, examine systematically the technologies that have sparked off these debates. They explore the problem of infertility, which is used to invalidate reproductive technologies; the way assumptions about the family and about biological parenthood continue to structure the arguments for and against; the impact of the medicalization of childbirth; the way debates are embedded in changing conceptions of paternal rights, maternal rights and embryo rights; the problems of providing adequate health care for women; and, above all, the urgency with which these issues raise problems about the accountability of science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780745602080 20160527
Green Library
Book
xvi, 315 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Part I: ARTs in a Neoliberal World of Transnational Reproflows 1. Citizen, Subject, Property: Indian Surrogacy and the Global Fertility Market Kalindi Vora and Malathi Iyengar 2. Fair Play in a Dirty Field? The Ethical Work of Commissioning Surrogacy in India Kristin Engh Forde 3. "Families Like We'd Always Known"? Spanish Gay Fathers' Normalization Narratives in Transnational Surrogacy Marcin Smietana 4. Destination Spain: Negotiating Nationality and Fertility when Traveling for Eggs Charlotte Krolokke 5. The South African Economy of Egg Donation: Looking at the BioEconomic Side of Normalization Verena Namberger Part II: Perplexed State Regulations, Legal Inconsistencies and Cultural Tricksters 6. Governing New Reproductive Technologies across Western Europe: The Gender Dimension Isabelle Engeli and Christine Rothmayr Allison 7. Norwegian Biopolitics in the First Decade of the 2000s: Family Politics and Assisted Reproduction Understood through the Concept of the Trickster Kristin Spilker 8. Bringing it All Back Home: Cross-Border Procreative Practices. Examples from Norway Marit Melhuus 9. Finland as a Late Regulator of Assisted Reproduction: A Permissive Policy under Debate Lise Eriksson Part III: Religious Fundamentalism, Humanist Values, and State Dilemmas in an Era of Technological Monsters 10. Reframing Conception, Reproducing Society: Italian Paradoxes Manuela Perrotta 11. The Veto of Moral Politics: The Catholic Church and ARTs in Ireland Orla McDonnell 12. Desiring Bodies: Problematizing the Matter of ARTs in Poland Edyta Just 13. Germany goes PGD: The Appeal to Women's and Human Rights Discourse in the Paradigmatic Amendment to the German Embryo Protection Act Bettina Bock von Wulfingen 14. Matters of Donation and Preserved Relations: Co-Construction of Egg Donation and Family Structures in Iran Tara Mehrabi Part IV: ARTs as Entangled in Demographic Agendas and Biopolitics 15. Babies from Behind Bars: Stratified Assisted Reproduction in Palestine/Israel Sigrid Vertommen 16. From Precarity to Self-Governance: Performing Motherhood through IVF Treatment in Ukraine Polina Vlasenko 17. Russian Legislative Practices and Debates on the Restriction of Wide Access to ARTs Maria Kirpichenko Part V: "New Normals" and their Discontents 18. Lesbian Kinship and ARTs in American Popular Culture: The L Word and The Kids Are All Right Julianne Pidduck 19. Naturalization and Un-Naturalization: ARTs, Childlessness and Choice Malin Noem Ravn 20. Sperm Stories: Sociotechnical Imaginaries of Sperm Donation and Sperm Banking in Denmark Stine Willum Adrian 21. Cellular Origins: A Visual Analysis of Time-Lapse Embryo Imaging Lucy van de Wiel.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138674646 20161205
Today, it often seems as though Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) have reached a stage of normalization, at least in some countries and among certain social groups. Apparently some practices - for example in vitro fertilization (IVF) - have become standard worldwide. The contributors to Assisted Reproduction Across Borders argue against normalization as an uncontested overall trend. This volume reflects on the state of the art of ARTs. From feminist perspectives, the contributors focus on contemporary political debates triggered by ARTs. They examine the varying ways in which ARTs are interpreted and practised in different contexts, depending on religious, moral and political approaches. Assisted Reproduction Across Borders embeds feminist analysis of ARTs across a wide variety of countries and cultural contexts, discussing controversial practices such as surrogacy from the perspective of the global South as well as the global North as well as inequalities in terms of access to IVF. This volume will appeal to scholars and students of anthropology, ethnography, philosophy, political science, history, sociology, film studies, media studies, literature, art history, area studies, and interdisciplinary areas such as gender studies, cultural studies, and postcolonial studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138674646 20161205
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 203 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Conceptions
  • Making reproduction profitable: the contemporary surrogacy market
  • Laboring to conceive: surrogacy as work
  • Managing relations: surrogates and their intended parents
  • Working from home: surrogates and their families
  • Obscured labor.
While the practice of surrogacy has existed for millennia, new fertility technologies have allowed women to act as gestational surrogates, carrying children that are not genetically their own. While some women volunteer to act as gestational surrogates for friends or family members, others get paid for performing this service. The first ethnographic study of gestational surrogacy in the United States, Labor of Love examines the conflicted attitudes that emerge when the ostensibly priceless act of bringing a child into the world becomes a paid occupation. Heather Jacobson interviews not only surrogate mothers, but also their family members, the intended parents who employ surrogates, and the various professionals who work to facilitate the process. Seeking to understand how gestational surrogates perceive their vocation, she discovers that many regard surrogacy as a calling, but are reluctant to describe it as a job. In the process, Jacobson dissects the complex set of social attitudes underlying this resistance toward conceiving of pregnancy as a form of employment. Through her extensive field research, Jacobson gives readers a firsthand look at the many challenges faced by gestational surrogates, who deal with complicated medical procedures, delicate work-family balances, and tricky social dynamics. Yet Labor of Love also demonstrates the extent to which advances in reproductive technology are affecting all Americans, changing how we think about maternity, family, and the labor involved in giving birth.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813569512 20160619
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
241 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction. L'émergence des technologies de la reproduction en Afrique au sud du Sahara -- Pluralité des contextes -- Politiques de population en Afrique du sud au prisme de la santé reproductive -- Ruptures ou continuités ? -- Construction d'un discours médiatisé et d'un public sur l'assistance médicale à la procréation. Le cas des sites web de cliniques et centres de dons africains -- Assisted reproductive technologies in private IVF clinics in Ghana and Uganda -- Local responses to the scarcity of embtyologists -- Le chemin du don et ses trois paradoxes. Des femmes africaines et le don d'ovocytes en France, Véronique Duchesne -- Parcours de soins et expériences mondialisées -- Parcours en ligne d'internautes africaines francophones : une (bio) médicalisation de la reproduction ? -- Bloguer sur son infertilité : parcours de soins et espace d'expression de patients en Afrique du Sud -- Biomedical infertility care and assisted reproduction. Mozambican infertile couples transnational therapeutic itineraries -- Spécificité du parcours d'assistance médicale à la procréation chez les couples originaires d'Afrique subsaharienne en situation migratoire en France -- Conjugalité et relations familiales -- La stigmatisation des couples infertiles au Sénégal. Entre logiques conjugales et logiques familiales -- Infécondité et nouvelles techniques de reproduction au Gabon. De la sorcellerie familiale à la sorcellerie technologique -- Infécondité de couples burkinabè. L'expérience de l'épreuve dans le recours à l'assistance médicale à la procréation -- Les savoirs privés de l'infécondité masculine (Douala, Cameroun) -- Conclusion. Interroger la parenté africaine au regard des techniques de la reproduction.
"Introduites en Afrique subsaharienne à partir des années 1980-1990, les technologies de la reproduction y sont encore largement méconnues. Leur émergence est intervenue dans un contexte sanitaire où l'offre de soins en santé de la reproduction est largement insuffisante. Face à la stigmatisation sociale et aux pressions familiales (risques de répudiation, divorce, polygamie), des couples inféconds se tournent, souvent à l'insu de la famille et de l'entourage, vers la fécondation in vitro au sein de cliniques privées de métropoles africaines. D'autres décident de partir à l'étranger, vers un pays voisin ou sur un autre continent, sur recommandation médicale ou par souci de confidentialité. Dans ce contexte, l'assistance médicale à la procréation reste porteuse de profondes inégalités, puisque uniquement accessible aux classes moyennes. Mais il n'est pas rare que des couples peu fortunés en viennent à vendre des biens et à recourir à des prêts pour le paiement d'une fécondation in vitro. La procréation médicale est une nouvelle façon de faire des enfants et donc de faire des parents. Elle révèle l'émergence de l'idée d'un enfant du couple et non plus seulement d'un enfant du lignage. Certes, elle répond à des objectifs thérapeutiques, mais elle est aussi emblématique d'un contexte africain urbain contemporain où mariage, sexualité, engendrement et parentalité peuvent être dissociés."--Page 4 of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 245 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Focusing on the key themes of power, kinship, and technological innovation, this volume offers a set of carefully argued empirical studies that emphasize the importance of ethnographic method, as well as anthropological theory, to current debates about the reproductive processes of humans, animals, and plants. In chapters on abortion, assisted conception, biodiversity conservation, artificial life sciences, adoption, intellectual property, and prenatal screening, Reproducing Reproduction contends that ideologies of class, nation, health, gender, nature, and kinship have reproductive models at their core.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812215847 20160527
Green Library
Book
ix, 238 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiii, 270 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
x, 255 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments Introduction Chapter 1. The Virtual Meeting Ground for Real People Chapter 2. Journey Chapter 3. Contract Chapter 4. Money Chapter 5. Gift Conclusion Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781785332746 20170123
Zsuzsa Berend presents a methodologically innovative ethnography of SurroMomsOnline.com, the largest surrogacy support website in the United States. Surrogates' views emerge from the stories, debates, and discussions that unfold online. The Online World of Surrogacy documents these collective meaning-making practices and explores their practical, emotional, and moral implications. In doing so, the book works through themes of interest across the social sciences, including definitions of parenthood, the symbolic role of money, reproductive loss, altruism, and the moral valuation of relationships.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781785332746 20170123
Green Library
Book
xii, 201 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Preface Acknowledgements Introduction Chapter 1. The Desire to Have a Child Chapter 2. Religion as Discourse and Practice Chapter 3. Childlessness among Kin and Friends Chapter 4. Manhood Ideologies and IVF Chapter 5. Achievement and Procreation Conclusion Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781782386346 20160618
Managing social relationships for childless couples in pro-natalist societies can be a difficult art to master, and may even become an issue of belonging for both men and women. With ethnographic research gathered from two IVF clinics and in two villages in northwestern Turkey, this book explores infertility and assisted reproductive technologies within a secular Muslim population. The author investigates the experience of infertility through various perspectives, such as the importance of having a child for women, the mediating role of religion, the power dynamics in same-gender relationships, and the impact of manhood ideologies on the decision for - or against - having an IVF.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781782386346 20160618
Green Library
Book
x, 211 pages ; 24 cm
India is the top provider of surrogacy services in the world, with a multi-million dollar surrogacy industry that continues to grow exponentially, as increasing numbers of couples from developed nations look for wombs in which to grow their babies. Some scholars have exulted transnational surrogacy for the possibilities it opens for infertile couples, while others have offered bioethical cautionary tales, rebuked exploitative intended parents, or lamented the exploitation of surrogate mothers--but very little is known about the experience of and transaction between surrogate mothers and intended parents outside the lens of the many agencies that control surrogacy in India. Drawing from rich interviews with surrogate mothers and egg donors in Bangalore, as well as twenty straight and gay couples in the U.S. and Australia, Discounted Life focuses on the processes of social and market exchange in transnational surrogacy. Sharmila Rudrappa interrogates the creation and maintenance of reproductive labor markets, the function of agencies and surrogacy brokers, and how women become surrogate mothers. Is surrogacy solely a labor contract for which the surrogate mother receives wages, or do its meanings and import exceed the confines of the market? Rudrappa argues that this reproductive industry is organized to control and disempower women workers and yet her interviews reveal that, by and large, the surrogate mothers in Bangalore found the experience life affirming. Rudrappa explores this tension, and the lived realities of many surrogate mothers whose deepening bodily commodification is paradoxically experienced as a revitalizing life development. A detailed and moving study, Discounted Life delineates how local labor markets intertwine with global reproduction industries, how Bangalore's surrogate mothers make sense of their participation in reproductive assembly lines, and the remarkable ways in which they negotiate positions of power for themselves in progressively untenable socio-economic conditions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781479874521 20160619
Green Library
Book
160 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Contents: Introduction: disembodiment. Part I Reproduction in the Twenty-First Century: New reproductive technologies and disembodiment. Part II Feminism and New Reproductive Technologies: Resistors and embracers-- Equivocals. Part III Material Resolutions: Mary O'Brien and 'the feminist standpoint revisited'-- Postconstructionist, 'new' material feminisms: breaking feminist waves-- Conclusion. Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472437051 20160618
With attention to the ways in which new reproductive technologies facilitate the gradual disembodiment of reproduction, this book reveals the paradox of women's reproductive experience in patriarchal cultures as being both, and often simultaneously, empowering and disempowering. A rich exploration of birth appropriation in the West, New Reproductive Technologies and Disembodiment investigates the assimilation of women's embodied power into patriarchal systems of symbolism, culture and politics through the inversion of women's and men's reproductive roles. Contending that new reproductive technologies represent another world historical moment, both in their forging of novel social relations and material processes of reproduction, and their manner of disembodying women in unprecedented ways - a disembodiment evident in recent visual and literary, popular and academic texts - this volume locates the roots of this disembodiment in western political discourse. A call to feminist political theory to re-remember the material dimensions of bodies and their philosophical significance, New Reproductive Technologies and Disembodiment will appeal to scholars of sociology, gender studies, political and social theory and the study of science, technology and health.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472437051 20160618
Green Library
Book
237 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction. Pour une sociologie des décalages -- La chaîne mondiale du travail reproductif -- L'éclatement du corps reproducteur binaire -- Les décalages entre pratiques et réglementations en France -- L'émergence de nouveaux assemblages corporels au Moyen-Orient -- L'hétérogénéité des arrangements nationaux -- L'explosion du système de genre dans l'arène reproductive -- Les circuits transnationaux de l'assistance à la reproduction -- L'ébranlement de l'organisation hétéronormée du travail reproductif -- Le brouillage du masculin et du féminin -- Les inégalités du travail reproductif dans la société globale -- La construction d'un regard global sur la reproduction -- La double domination liée à la migration -- La chaîne mondiale du travail reproductif -- La dynamique de genre dans l'arène reproductive -- Le nouveau processus de féminisation du corps reproducteur -- Le corps moderne et ses reliques -- La fabrication des corps sexués -- De l'église à l'hôpital -- La généalogie paradoxale des contraintes hétéronormatives -- L'hétéronormativité, une catégorie d'analyse -- Les brèches modernes dans l'hétéronormativité -- Les reconfigurations contemporaines des liens entre sexualité et reproduction -- L'ébranlement du pouvoir masculin -- Pouvoirs, dominations, hiérarchies et résistances -- L'émergence de l'individu masculin -- La fragilisation par la science du contrôle masculin -- La biomédicalisation du corps infécond -- Les contradictions de la biomédicalisation -- Le cadrage biomédical du corps sexué infécond -- La permanence de la responsabilité féminine -- Les résistances du corps à la technique -- Les paradoxes contemporains de l'hétéronormativité -- La deuxième révolution contraceptive et ses ambivalences -- Les tensions sociales au coeur de la fécondation in vitro -- Le don de gamètes entre dénormalisation et renaturalisation -- Les recompositions des hiérarchies -- L'apparente égalité autour de la technique -- La persistance de relations de domination -- La sacralisation de l'autorité médicale -- L'emprise des hiérarchies sociales sur le corps reproducteur -- Le façonnement social du corps reproducteur biomédicalisé -- L'apparente homogénéité sociale des recours techniques -- L'inégalité sociale face aux risques de l'innovation -- La discrimination masquée -- Le déroulement des parcours entre production, reproduction et sexualité -- Un analyseur des trajectoires combinant genre et travail -- Les dépendances multiples des itinéraires hétéronormés -- La diversité des processus d'autonomisation -- L'inégalité sociale au coeur des dynamiques de changement -- L'évaluation du succès, enjeu de pouvoir -- L'arbitrage socialement différencié de l'âge limite -- Le potentiel d'émancipation révélateur des hiérarchies sociales -- Le corps reproducteur et la différenciation des sexes : prendre appui sur une modélisation ternaire du corps -- L'activité reproductive, la division du travail et l'hétéronormativité : analyser les agencements production/reproduction/sexualité des parcours -- Les hiérarchies, dominations, contestations et résistances : observer les imbrications de rapports sociaux dans "la chaîne mondiale de travail reproductif".
"Au coeur de l'actualité du XXIe siècle, les nouvelles techniques reproductives, appui majeur pour l'émancipation des femmes au XXe siècle, bousculent les certitudes, ouvrent de nouvelles interrogations, suscitent la controverse. La reproduction humaine n'est pas seulement une branche de la biomédecine. C'est aussi un théâtre social que Laurence Tain explore méthodiquement, sans oublier les coulisses. Elle distingue quatre scènes où se confrontent et s'affrontent les différents acteurs. La société globale, avec ses circuits transnationaux et ses inégalités géopolitiques, est le cadre des transactions et des assemblages corporels. Le genre, avec ses contraintes hétéronormées et ses ambivalences, est l'arène par excellence où se joue la fabrication de l'enfant. L'institution biomédicale, avec ses tensions entre professionnels et profanes, a désormais pris le relais de l'Église comme instance normative. Enfin la hiérarchie sociale demeure un facteur déterminant et discriminant de l'usage de ces pratiques. Illustré de nombreux extraits d'entretiens et se fondant sur l'étude de dossiers médicaux, l'ouvrage apporte une contribution décisive pour comprendre les enjeux de la procréation médicalement assistée."--P. [4] of cover.
Green Library
Book
xvii, 310 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations Preface 1 . A Skeleton in the Closet and Fetuses in the Basement 2 . Embryo Visions 3 . Building a Collection 4 . Inside the Embryo Production Factory 5 . Traffic in "Embryo Babies" 6 . Embryo Tales 7 . From Dead Embryos to Icons of Life 8 . The Demise of the Mount Holyoke Collection Notes References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520260436 20160528
"Icons of Life" tells the engrossing and provocative story of an early twentieth-century undertaking, the Carnegie Institution of Washington's project to collect thousands of embryos for scientific study. Lynn M. Morgan blends social analysis, sleuthing, and humor to trace the history of specimen collecting. In the process, she illuminates how a hundred-year-old scientific endeavor continues to be felt in today's fraught arena of maternal and fetal politics. Until the embryo collecting project - which she follows from the Johns Hopkins anatomy department, through Baltimore foundling homes, and all the way to China - most people had no idea what human embryos looked like. But by the 1950s, modern citizens saw in embryos an image of 'ourselves unborn', and embryology had developed a biologically based story about how we came to be. Morgan explains how dead specimens paradoxically became icons of life, how embryos were generated as social artifacts separate from pregnant women, and how a fetus thwarted Gertrude Stein's medical career. By resurrecting a nearly forgotten scientific project, Morgan sheds light on the roots of a modern origin story and raises the still controversial issue of how we decide what embryos mean.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520260436 20160528
Green Library
Book
xx, 406 p. ; 25 cm.
Skyrocketing infertility rates and the accompanying explosion in reproductive technology are revolutionizing the American family and changing the way we think about parenthood, childbirth, and life itself. In this riveting work of investigative reporting, Liza Mundy, an award-winning journalist for "The Washington Post, " captures the human narratives, as well as the science, behind what is today a controversial, multibillion-dollar industry, and examines how the huge social experiment that is assisted reproduction is transforming our most basic relationships and even our destiny as a species. Based on in-depth reporting from across the nation and around the world, using riveting anecdotal material from doctors, families, and children--many of them now adults--conceived through in vitro fertilization, Mundy looks at the phenomena created by assisted reproduction and their ramifications. Never before in the history of humankind has it been possible for a woman to give birth to an infant who is genetically unrelated to her. Never before has it been possible for a woman to be the genetic parent of children to whom she has not given birth. Never before has the issue of choice had such kaleidoscopic implications. If you support reproductive freedom, does that mean you support everything being offered in the reproductive marketplace? Thawing frozen embryos and letting them expire? Selecting the sex of your baby? Conceiving triplets and "reducing" the pregnancy down to twins? "Everything Conceivable" explores the personal impact on individuals using assisted reproduction to conceive, and the moral, ethical, and pragmatic decisions they make on their journey to parenthood. It looks at the vast social consequences: for hospital neonatal wards, for family structure, for schools, for our notion of genetic relatedness and whether it matters, for adoption; for our nation as a whole, and how we think about the earliest human life-forms. The book explores questions of social justice: the ethics of buying or borrowing some part of the reproductive process, as with egg donation and surrogacy. It looks at entirely new family structures being created by families who have conceived using sperm donors, so that children may have half-siblings around the country with whom they are, or are not, in contact. And it looks toward the future, to the impact today's technology may have on coming generations. Fascinating, commanding, keenly observed and reported, rich in personal drama as well as in the science of evolution and reproduction, Liza Mundy's "Everything Conceivable" is a groundbreaking consideration of the changes sweeping through our culture and the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781400044283 20160527
Green Library
Book
160 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
341 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

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