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Book
xx, 406 p. ; 25 cm.
Skyrocketing infertility rates and the accompanying explosion in reproductive technology are revolutionizing the American family and changing the way we think about parenthood, childbirth, and life itself. In this riveting work of investigative reporting, Liza Mundy, an award-winning journalist for "The Washington Post, " captures the human narratives, as well as the science, behind what is today a controversial, multibillion-dollar industry, and examines how the huge social experiment that is assisted reproduction is transforming our most basic relationships and even our destiny as a species. Based on in-depth reporting from across the nation and around the world, using riveting anecdotal material from doctors, families, and children--many of them now adults--conceived through in vitro fertilization, Mundy looks at the phenomena created by assisted reproduction and their ramifications. Never before in the history of humankind has it been possible for a woman to give birth to an infant who is genetically unrelated to her. Never before has it been possible for a woman to be the genetic parent of children to whom she has not given birth. Never before has the issue of choice had such kaleidoscopic implications. If you support reproductive freedom, does that mean you support everything being offered in the reproductive marketplace? Thawing frozen embryos and letting them expire? Selecting the sex of your baby? Conceiving triplets and "reducing" the pregnancy down to twins? "Everything Conceivable" explores the personal impact on individuals using assisted reproduction to conceive, and the moral, ethical, and pragmatic decisions they make on their journey to parenthood. It looks at the vast social consequences: for hospital neonatal wards, for family structure, for schools, for our notion of genetic relatedness and whether it matters, for adoption; for our nation as a whole, and how we think about the earliest human life-forms. The book explores questions of social justice: the ethics of buying or borrowing some part of the reproductive process, as with egg donation and surrogacy. It looks at entirely new family structures being created by families who have conceived using sperm donors, so that children may have half-siblings around the country with whom they are, or are not, in contact. And it looks toward the future, to the impact today's technology may have on coming generations. Fascinating, commanding, keenly observed and reported, rich in personal drama as well as in the science of evolution and reproduction, Liza Mundy's "Everything Conceivable" is a groundbreaking consideration of the changes sweeping through our culture and the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781400044283 20160527
Green Library
Book
xiii, 285 p. ; 23 cm.
  • The transformation of the family
  • Family law in transition
  • Status and contract in surrogate motherhood
  • Unwed fathers and surrogate mothers
  • Social implications of biological transformations
  • The "intent" of reproduction
  • Suffer the children.
A study which argues that the family carried forward the feudal structure of hierarchy, mutual loyalty and lack of individual autonomy into the modern era until, like other institutions, it came under stress from the overriding reality of modern life: marketplace economics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780814718599 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Video
1 videodisc (35 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Martha Rosler discusses the social and economic implications of surrogate motherhood, using excerpts and quotations from media reports and court records of the Mary Beth Whitehead/Baby M case.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xvi, 265 pages ; 25 cm
  • The reproductive revolution
  • Our eugenics past
  • The high cost of assisted reproduction
  • Race and ethnicity as barriers to ART access
  • Social infertility and the quest for parenthood
  • Disability and procreative diminishment
  • The harms of procreative deprivation
  • The new eugenics.
A provocative examination of how unequal access to reproductive technology replays the sins of the eugenics movement Eugenics, the effort to improve the human species by inhibiting reproduction of "inferior" genetic strains, ultimately came to be regarded as the great shame of the Progressive movement. Judith Daar, a prominent expert on the intersection of law and medicine, argues that current attitudes toward the potential users of modern assisted reproductive technologies threaten to replicate eugenics' same discriminatory practices. In this book, Daar asserts how barriers that block certain people's access to reproductive technologies are often founded on biases rooted in notions of class, race, and marital status. As a result, poor, minority, unmarried, disabled, and LGBT individuals are denied technologies available to well-off nonminority heterosexual applicants. An original argument on a highly emotional and important issue, this work offers a surprising departure from more familiar arguments on the issue as it warns physicians, government agencies, and the general public against repeating the mistakes of the past.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300137156 20170327
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 360 p. ; 24 cm.
Assisted reproductive technology (ART) makes babies and parents at once. Drawing on science and technology studies and feminist theory and on historical and ethnographic analyses of ART clinics, Charis Thompson explores the intertwining of biological reproduction with the personal, political, and technological meanings of reproduction. She analyzes the "ontological choreography" at ART clinics - the dynzmics by which technical, scientific, kinship, gender, emotional, legal, political, financial, and other matters are coordinated - using ethnographic data to address questions usually treated in the abstract. Reproductive technologies, says Thompson, are part of the increasing tendency to turn social problems into biomedical questions and can be used as a lens through which to see the resulting changes in the relations between science and society. After giving an account of the book's disciplinary roots in science and technology studies and in feminist scholarship on reproduction, Thompson comes to the ethnographic heart of her study. She develops her concept of ontological choreography by examining ART's normalization of "miraculous" technology (including the etiquette of technological sex); gender identity in the assigned roles of mother and father and the conservative nature of gender relations in the clinic; the naturalization of technologically assisted kinship and procreative intent; and patients' pursuit of agency through objectification and technology. Finally, Thompson explores the economies of reproductive technologies, concluding with a speculative and polemical look at the "biomedical mode of reproduction" as a predictor of future relations between science and society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262201568 20160528
Green Library
Book
ix, 214 p. ; 23 cm.
  • The tailor-made child - implications for women and the State, Patricia Bayer Richard-- foetal personhood - political identity under construction, Deirdre Moira Condit-- foetal endangerment vs foetal warfare - discretion of prosecutors in determining criminal liability, Ruth Ann Strickland and Marcia Lynn Whicker-- a gender analysis of policy formation - the case of foetal abuse, Jean Reith Schroedel and Paul Peretz-- punishment, treatment, empowerment - three approaches to policy for pregnant addicts, Iris Marion Young-- the ACLU philosophy and the right to abuse the unborn, Phillip E. Johnson-- the trope of the dark continent in the foetal-harm debates - "Africanism" and the right to choice, Lisa C. Bower-- "surrogate mothering" and women's freedom - a critique of contracts for human reproduction, Mary Lyndon Shanley-- the "gift" of a child - commercial surrogacy, gift surrogacy and motherhood, Uma Narayan.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813320038 20160528
The growing availability of new reproductive technologies have raised moral and political questions, not only for pregnant women, but for anyone who wishes the State to make wise and humane decisions in this extremely sensitive area. This book brings together a group of feminist scholars to explore the ethics and politics of questions such as surrogacy, genetic intervention, in-vitro fertilization, and other issues affecting the unborn child. It discusses the wide range of technologies and their moral implications, and is intended for anyone involved in decisions on the unborn child, from parents to medical practitioners.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813320038 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
214 p.
  • The tailor-made child - implications for women and the State, Patricia Bayer Richard-- foetal personhood - political identity under construction, Deirdre Moira Condit-- foetal endangerment vs foetal warfare - discretion of prosecutors in determining criminal liability, Ruth Ann Strickland and Marcia Lynn Whicker-- a gender analysis of policy formation - the case of foetal abuse, Jean Reith Schroedel and Paul Peretz-- punishment, treatment, empowerment - three approaches to policy for pregnant addicts, Iris Marion Young-- the ACLU philosophy and the right to abuse the unborn, Phillip E. Johnson-- the trope of the dark continent in the foetal-harm debates - "Africanism" and the right to choice, Lisa C. Bower-- "surrogate mothering" and women's freedom - a critique of contracts for human reproduction, Mary Lyndon Shanley-- the "gift" of a child - commercial surrogacy, gift surrogacy and motherhood, Uma Narayan.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813320038 20160528
The growing availability of new reproductive technologies have raised moral and political questions, not only for pregnant women, but for anyone who wishes the State to make wise and humane decisions in this extremely sensitive area. This book brings together a group of feminist scholars to explore the ethics and politics of questions such as surrogacy, genetic intervention, in-vitro fertilization, and other issues affecting the unborn child. It discusses the wide range of technologies and their moral implications, and is intended for anyone involved in decisions on the unborn child, from parents to medical practitioners.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813320038 20160528
Green Library

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