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Book
xiv, 281 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 27 cm
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
191 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
336 p., 16 plates; illus., maps, plans. 18 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
127 p. ; 20 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
267 p. chiefly illus., plans. 20 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
214 p. illus. 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vii, 343 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
From 1895 to the founding of the United Nations in 1945, the promising new science of ecology flourished in the British Empire. Peder Anker asks why ecology expanded so rapidly and how a handful of influential scientists and politicians established a tripartite ecology of nature, knowledge, and society. Patrons in the northern and southern extremes of the Empire, he argues, urgently needed tools for understanding environmental history as well as human relations to nature and society in order to set policies for the management of natural resources and to effect social control of natives and white settlement. Holists such as Jan Christian Smuts and mechanists such as Arthur George Tansley vied for the right to control and carry out ecological research throughout the British Empire and to lay a foundation of economic and social policy that extended from Spitsbergen to Cape Town. The enlargement of the field from botany to human ecology required a broader methodological base, and ecologists drew especially on psychology and economy. They incorporated those methodologies and created a new ecological order for environmental, economic, and social management of the Empire.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674005952 20160527
Green Library
Book
xi, 342 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Nineteenth-century Britain led the world in technological innovation and urbanization, and unprecedented population growth contributed as well to the "rash assault, " to quote Wordworth, on Victorian countrysides. Yet James Winter finds that the British environment was generally spared widespread ecological damage. Drawing from a variety of sources and disciplines, Winter focuses on human intervention as it not only destroyed but also preserved the physical environment. Industrial blight could be contained, he says, because of Britain's capacity to import resources from elsewhere, the conservative effect of the estate system, and certain intrinsic limitations of steam engines. The rash assault was further blunted by traditional agricultural practices, preservation of forests, and a growing recreation industry that favoured beloved landscapes. Winter's illumination of Victorian attitudes toward the exploitation of natural resources offers a preamble to ongoing discussions of human intervention in the environment.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520216099 20160528
Green Library
Book
336 p. : ill. ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiv,216 p. illus. 25cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
250 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Landskipping is a ravishing celebration of landscape, its iridescent beauty and its potential to comfort, awe and mesmerise. In spirit as Romantic as rational, Anna Pavord explores the different ways in which we have, throughout the ages, responded to the land. In the eighteenth century, artists first started to paint English scenery, and the Lakes, as well as Snowdon, began to attract a new kind of visitor, the landscape tourist. Early travel guides sought to capture the beauty and inspiration of waterfall, lake and fell. Sublime! Picturesque! they said, as they laid down rules for correctly appreciating a view. While painters painted and writers wrote, an entirely different band of men, the agricultural improvers, also travelled the land, and published a series of remarkable commentaries on the state of agricultural England. They looked at the land in terms of its usefulness as well as its beauty, and, using their reports, Anna Pavord explores the many different ways that land was managed and farmed, showing that what is universal is a place's capacity to frame and define our experience. Moving from the rolling hills of Dorset to the peaks of the Scottish Highlands, this is an exquisite and compelling book, written with zest, passion and deep understanding.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781408868911 20160619
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 395 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. Environmental Aspects of the Atlantic Slave Trade and CaribbeanPlantations-- 3. The Fur Trade in Canada-- 4. Hunting, Wildlife, and Imperialism in Southern Africa-- 5. Imperial Travellers-- 6. Sheep, Pastures, and Demography in Australia-- 7. Forests and Forestry in India-- 8. Water, Irrigation, and Agrarian Society in India and Egypt-- 9. Colonial Cities: Environment, Space, and Race-- 10. Plague and Urban Environments-- 11. Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis in East and Central Africa-- 12. Imperial Scientists, Ecology, and Conservation-- 13. Empire and the Visual Representation of Nature-- 14. Rubber and the Environment in Malaysia-- 15. Oil Extraction in the Middle East: the Kuwait Experience-- 16. Resistance to Colonial Conservation and Resource Management-- 17. National Parks and the Growth of Tourism-- 18. The Post-Imperial Urban Environment-- 19. Reassertion of Indigenous Environmental Rights and Knowledge.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199260317 20160528
European imperialism was extraordinarily far-reaching: a key global historical process of the last 500 years. It locked disparate human societies together over a wider area than any previous imperial expansion; it underpinned the repopulation of the Americas and Australasia; it was the precursor of globalization as we now understand it. Imperialism was inseparable from the history of global environmental change. Metropolitan countries sought raw materials of all kinds, from timber and furs to rubber and oil. They established sugar plantations that transformed island ecologies. Settlers introduced new methods of farming and displaced indigenous peoples. Colonial cities, many of which became great conurbations, fundamentally changed relationships between people and nature. Consumer cultures, the internal combustion engine, and pollution are now ubiquitous. Environmental history deals with the reciprocal interaction between people and other elements in the natural world, and this book illustrates the diverse environmental themes in the history of empire. Initially concentrating on the material factors that shaped empire and environmental change, Environment and Empire discusses the way in which British consumers and manufacturers sucked in resources that were gathered, hunted, fished, mined, and farmed. Yet it is also clear that British settler and colonial states sought to regulate the use of natural resources as well as commodify them. Conservation aimed to preserve resources by exclusion, as in wildlife parks and forests, and to guarantee efficient use of soil and water. Exploring these linked themes of exploitation and conservation, this study concludes with a focus on political reassertions by colonised peoples over natural resources. In a post-imperial age, they have found a new voice, reformulating ideas about nature, landscape, and heritage and challenging, at a local and global level, views of who has the right to regulate nature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199260317 20160528
Green Library
Book
x, 306 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Preface Histories of Their Time The Management of Change Nature Incorporated New Beginnings In Forestry A Third Force Environmental Conservation Transport and the Environment Environmental Hazards The Century of the Environment Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780333949818 20160528
Environmental history - the history of the relationship between people and the natural world - is a dynamic and increasingly important field. In An Environmental History of Twentieth-Century Britain, John Sheail breaks new ground in illustrating how some of the most pressing concerns came to be recognised, and a response made. Much use is made of archival sources in tracing a number of key issues, including: * management of change by central and local government * the manner in which natural processes were incorporated in projects to protect personal and public health, and ultimately environmental health * new beginnings in forestry * the emergence of a third force alongside farming and forestry in the countryside * management of a transport revolution, and mitigation of environmental hazards Such instances of policy-making are reviewed within the wider context of a growing awareness, both on the part of government and business, of the role of environmental issues in the creation of wealth and social well-being for us all. An Environmental History of Twentieth-Century Britain is essential reading for all those concerned with these issues.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780333949818 20160528
Green Library
Book
xi, 173 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Setting and Scenes, Origins, Ancestral Geographies, Keeping to the Path, Working Stone, A Gift from the Ancestors, The Living and the Dead, Attending to the Dead, A Time and a Place for Enclosure, Drawing the Line, Arenas of Value, The Pattern of Things, Changes in the Land, Post Excavation, Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415204323 20160527
The causewayed enclosures of the Neolithic are the first monumental structures in the British Isles. But the uses to which these vast concentric rings of raised walkways were put remains confused. Archaeological evidence suggests that these sites had many different, and often contradictory functions, and there may have been other uses for which no evidence survives. How can archaeologists present an effective interpretation, with the consciousness that both their own subjectivitiy, and the variety of conflicing views will determine their approach. Because these sites have become a focus for so much controversy, the problem of presenting them to the public assumes a critical importance. The authors raise central issues which occur in all archaeological interpretation, especially in sites that have been put to a variety of uses over time. The authors have not tried to provide a comprehensive review of the archaeology of all these causewayed sites in Britain, but rather to use them as case studies in the development of an archaeological interpretaion. These techniques and approaches can be applied to sites of many periods. Mark Edmonds surveys the varied approaches which have been made to the sites, and show the "communities of interpretation" which emerged. In many cases, these have used the enclosures to support models derived from other sources. They suggest that this approach has skewed the evidence to be derived from the sites themselves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415204323 20160527
Green Library
Book
78 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
237 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction, by John Howe and Michael Wolfe Part One: Managed Landscapes 1. The Medieval Countryside of England: Botany and Archaeology, by Oliver Rackham 2. Veneurs s'en vont en Paradis: Medieval Hunting and the "Natural" Landscape, by John Cummins 3. New Habitats for the Rabbit in Northern Europe, 1300-1600, by Petra J.E.M. van Dam 4. Politics, Perception, and the Meaning of Landscape in Late Medieval Venice: Marco Cornaro's 1442 Inspection of Firewood Supplies, by Karl Appuhn Part Two: Created Landscapes 5. The Landscape of Anglo-Saxon England: Inherited, Invented, Imagined, by Nicholas Howe 6. Tribal Landscapes of Islamic Spain: History and Archaeology, by Thomas Glick 7. From Alien Terrain to the Abode of Islam: Landscapes in the Conquest of al-Andalus, by Janina Safran 8. Private Pleasures: Painted Gardens on the Manuscript Page, by Bridget Ann Henisch Part Three: Imagined Landscapes 9. Landscape, Gender, and Ethnogenesis in Pre-Norman Invasion Ireland, by Lisa Bitel 10. Narrative Time and Literary Landscapes in Middle English Poetry, by Laura L. Howes 11. Creating Symbolic Landscapes: Medieval Development of Sacred Space, by John Howe.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813024790 20160528
Far from the forest primeval of popular imagination, the historians and literary scholars in this book describe a Western European landscape just as consciously constructed by its inhabitants as any modern landscape - physically, conceptually, and spiritually. All appearing for the first time in print, their essays provide a wealth of detail on this "deep ecology" of the Middle Ages and a better understanding of the creativity and skill of our cultural ancestors.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813024790 20160528
Green Library
Book
160 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
154 p.; 20 cm.
Green Library
Book
xvi, 323 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • Foreword John M. MacKenzie Part I - Framing Imperial and Regional Networks of Nature 1. Eco-Cultural Networks in the British Empire, 1860-1940 James Beattie (University of Waikato, New Zealand), Edward Melillo (Amherst College, USA), Emily O'Gorman (Macquarie University, Australia) 2. Climate, Empire and Environment Georgina Endfield (University of Nottingham, England) and Sam Randalls (University College, London, England) 3. The Chinese State and Agriculture in an Age of Global Empires, 1880-1949 Joseph Lawson (Newcastle University, England) 4. Empire in a Cup: Imagining Colonial Geographies Through British Tea Consumption Edward Melillo 5. Africa, Europe and the Birds Between Them Nancy Jacobs (Brown University, USA) Part II - Local Cultural Networks of Exchange 6. Peradeniya and the plantation economy in Ceylon Eugenia Herbert (Mount Holyoke College, USA) 7. Eco-cultural networks in southern China and colonial New Zealand, 1860s-1910s James Beattie 8. Colonial Cultures of Hunting Kate Hunter (Victoria University, New Zealand) 9. Game of Empires: Hunting in Treaty-Port China Robert Peckham (University of Hong Kong) 10. Experiments, Local Environments, and Networks in Rice farming in South-Eastern Australia, 1900-1945 Emily O'Gorman 11. Animals and Urban Environments: Managing Domestic Animals in Nineteenth-Century Winnipeg Sean Kheraj (York University, Canada) 13. Reflections and New Research Directions Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781441109835 20160618
19th-century British imperial expansion dramatically shaped today's globalised world. Imperialism encouraged mass migrations of people, shifting flora, fauna and commodities around the world and led to a series of radical environmental changes never before experienced in history. Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire explores how these networks shaped ecosystems, cultures and societies throughout the British Empire and how they were themselves transformed by local and regional conditions. This multi-authored volume begins with a rigorous theoretical analysis of the categories of 'empire' and 'imperialism'. Its chapters, written by leading scholars in the field, draw methodologically from recent studies in environmental history, post-colonial theory and the history of science. Together, these perspectives provide a comprehensive historical understanding of how the British Empire reshaped the globe during the 19th and 20th centuries. This book will be an important addition to the literature on British imperialism and global ecological change.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781441109835 20160618
Green Library
Book
x, 211 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
This study of the relationship between human activity and environmental change from the Iron Age to the end of the Anglo-Saxon period brings together the results of the latest research in many fields to reconstruct changes in climate, sea level, soils and vegetation. The consequences of the major cultural changes of the first millennium are examined, including the Roman Conquest, the end of Roman Britain, and the Anglo-Saxon settlement, revealing the different ways in which human activity modified the environment.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780715629031 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

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