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Book
xiv, 374 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
xxiii, 716 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • Part I: Basic Principles1. Introduction - Yang-chih Fu, Dominique Joye, Tom W. Smith and Christof Wolf2. Survey standards - Tom W. Smith 3. Total survey error: a paradigm for survey methodology - Lars E. Lyberg and Herbert F. Weisberg 4. Challenges of comparative survey research - Timothy P. Johnson and Michael Braun Part II: Surveys and Societies5. Surveys and society - Claire Durand 6. Defining and assessing survey climate - Geert Loosveldt and Dominique Joye 7. The Ethical issues of survey and market research - Kathy Joe, Finn Raben and Adam Phillips8. Observations on the historical development of polling - Kathleen A. Frankovic Part III: Planning a Survey9. Research question and designs for survey research - Ben Jann and Thomas Hinz 10. Total survey error paradigm: : Theory and Practice - Paul P. Biemer 11. Survey mode or survey modes? - Edith de Leeuw and Jernej Berzelak 12. Surveying in multi-cultural and multi-national contexts - Beth-Ellen Pennell and Kristen Cibelli-Hibben 13. Surveys in societies in turmoil - Zeina N. Mneimneh, Beth-Ellen Pennell, Jennifer Kelley and Kristen Cibelli-Hibben Part IV: Measurement14. What does Measurement Mean in a Survey Context? - Jaak Billiet 15. Cognitive models of answering processes - Kristen Miller and Gordon B. Willis16. Designing questions and questionnaires - Jolene D. Smyth 17. Creating a good question: how to use cumulative experience - Melanie Revilla, Diana Zavala-Rojas and Willem Saris18. Designing a mixed-mode survey - Don A. Dillman and Michelle L. Edwards 19. The Translation of Measurement Instruments for Cross-cultural Surveys - Dorothee Behr and Kuniaki Shishido 20. When Translation is not Enough: Background Variables in Comparative Surveys - Silke Schneider, Dominique Joye and Christof WolfPart V: Sampling21. Basics of sampling for survey research - Yves Tille and Alina Matei22. Nonprobability sampling - Vasja Vehovar, Vera Toepoel and Stephanie Steinmetz23. Special challenges of sampling for comparative surveys - Siegfried Gabler and Sabine Hader Part VI: Data Collection24. Questionnaire pretesting - Gordon B. Willis 25. Survey fieldwork - Annelies G. Blom 26. Responsive and adaptive designs - Francois Laflamme and James Wagner 27. Unit nonresponse - Ineke A. L. Stoop 28. Incentives as a possible measure to increase response rates - Michele Ernst Stahli and Dominique Joye Part VII: Preparing Data for Use29. Documenting Survey Data Across the Life Cycle - Mary Vardigan, Peter Granda and Lynette Hoelter30. Weighting: principles and practicalities - Pierre Lavallee and Jean-Francois Beaumont 31. Analysis of data from stratified and clustered surveys - Stephanie Eckman and Brady T. West 32. Analytical Potential Versus Data Confidentiality - Finding the Optimal Balance - Heike Wirth 33. Harmonizing Survey Questions Between Cultures and Over Time - Christof Wolf, Silke L. Schneider, Dorothee Behr and Dominique JoyePart VIII: Assessing and Improving Data Quality34. Survey data quality and measurement precision - Duane F. Alwin 35. Nonresponse error: detection and correction - Jelke Bethlehem and Barry Schouten 36. Response styles in surveys: understanding their causes and mitigating their impact - Caroline Roberts37. Dealing with missing values - Martin Spiess 38. Another Look at Survey Data Quality - Victor Thiessen and Jorg Blasius 39. Assessment of cross-cultural comparability - Jan Cieciuch, Eldad Davidov, Peter Schmidt and Rene AlgesheimerPart IX: Further Issues40. Data preservation, secondary analysis, and replication: learning from existing data - Lynette Hoelter, Amy Pienta and Jared Lyle41. Record linkage - Rainer Schnell 42. Supplementing cross-national surveys with contextual data - Jessica Fortin-Rittberger, David Howell, Stephen Quinlan and Bojan Todosijevic43. The Globalization of surveys - Tom W. Smith and Yang-chih Fu.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781446282663 20170821
Survey Methodology is becoming a more structured field of research, deserving of more and more academic attention. The SAGE Handbook of Survey Methodology explores both the increasingly scientific endeavour of surveys and their growing complexity, as different data collection modes and information sources are combined. The handbook takes a global approach, with a team of international experts looking at local and national specificities, as well as problems of cross-national, comparative survey research. The chapters are organized into seven major sections, each of which represents a stage in the survey life-cycle: Surveys and Societies Planning a Survey Measurement Sampling Data Collection Preparing Data for Use Assessing and Improving Data Quality The SAGE Handbook of Survey Methodology is a landmark and essential tool for any scholar within the social sciences.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781446282663 20170821
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (716 pages) : illustrations
  • Part I: Basic Principles1. Introduction - Yang-chih Fu, Dominique Joye, Tom W. Smith and Christof Wolf2. Survey standards - Tom W. Smith 3. Total survey error: a paradigm for survey methodology - Lars E. Lyberg and Herbert F. Weisberg 4. Challenges of comparative survey research - Timothy P. Johnson and Michael Braun Part II: Surveys and Societies5. Surveys and society - Claire Durand 6. Defining and assessing survey climate - Geert Loosveldt and Dominique Joye 7. The Ethical issues of survey and market research - Kathy Joe, Finn Raben and Adam Phillips8. Observations on the historical development of polling - Kathleen A. Frankovic Part III: Planning a Survey9. Research question and designs for survey research - Ben Jann and Thomas Hinz 10. Total survey error paradigm: : Theory and Practice - Paul P. Biemer 11. Survey mode or survey modes? - Edith de Leeuw and Jernej Berzelak 12. Surveying in multi-cultural and multi-national contexts - Beth-Ellen Pennell and Kristen Cibelli-Hibben 13. Surveys in societies in turmoil - Zeina N. Mneimneh, Beth-Ellen Pennell, Jennifer Kelley and Kristen Cibelli-Hibben Part IV: Measurement14. What does Measurement Mean in a Survey Context? - Jaak Billiet 15. Cognitive models of answering processes - Kristen Miller and Gordon B. Willis16. Designing questions and questionnaires - Jolene D. Smyth 17. Creating a good question: how to use cumulative experience - Melanie Revilla, Diana Zavala-Rojas and Willem Saris18. Designing a mixed-mode survey - Don A. Dillman and Michelle L. Edwards 19. The Translation of Measurement Instruments for Cross-cultural Surveys - Dorothee Behr and Kuniaki Shishido 20. When Translation is not Enough: Background Variables in Comparative Surveys - Silke Schneider, Dominique Joye and Christof WolfPart V: Sampling21. Basics of sampling for survey research - Yves Tille and Alina Matei22. Nonprobability sampling - Vasja Vehovar, Vera Toepoel and Stephanie Steinmetz23. Special challenges of sampling for comparative surveys - Siegfried Gabler and Sabine Hader Part VI: Data Collection24. Questionnaire pretesting - Gordon B. Willis 25. Survey fieldwork - Annelies G. Blom 26. Responsive and adaptive designs - Francois Laflamme and James Wagner 27. Unit nonresponse - Ineke A. L. Stoop 28. Incentives as a possible measure to increase response rates - Michele Ernst Stahli and Dominique Joye Part VII: Preparing Data for Use29. Documenting Survey Data Across the Life Cycle - Mary Vardigan, Peter Granda and Lynette Hoelter30. Weighting: principles and practicalities - Pierre Lavallee and Jean-Francois Beaumont 31. Analysis of data from stratified and clustered surveys - Stephanie Eckman and Brady T. West 32. Analytical Potential Versus Data Confidentiality - Finding the Optimal Balance - Heike Wirth 33. Harmonizing Survey Questions Between Cultures and Over Time - Christof Wolf, Silke L. Schneider, Dorothee Behr and Dominique JoyePart VIII: Assessing and Improving Data Quality34. Survey data quality and measurement precision - Duane F. Alwin 35. Nonresponse error: detection and correction - Jelke Bethlehem and Barry Schouten 36. Response styles in surveys: understanding their causes and mitigating their impact - Caroline Roberts37. Dealing with missing values - Martin Spiess 38. Another Look at Survey Data Quality - Victor Thiessen and Jorg Blasius 39. Assessment of cross-cultural comparability - Jan Cieciuch, Eldad Davidov, Peter Schmidt and Rene AlgesheimerPart IX: Further Issues40. Data preservation, secondary analysis, and replication: learning from existing data - Lynette Hoelter, Amy Pienta and Jared Lyle41. Record linkage - Rainer Schnell 42. Supplementing cross-national surveys with contextual data - Jessica Fortin-Rittberger, David Howell, Stephen Quinlan and Bojan Todosijevic43. The Globalization of surveys - Tom W. Smith and Yang-chih Fu.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781473959057 20170821
Survey Methodology is becoming a more structured field of research, deserving of more and more academic attention. The SAGE Handbook of Survey Methodology explores both the increasingly scientific endeavour of surveys and their growing complexity, as different data collection modes and information sources are combined. The handbook takes a global approach, with a team of international experts looking at local and national specificities, as well as problems of cross-national, comparative survey research. The chapters are organized into seven major sections, each of which represents a stage in the survey life-cycle: Surveys and Societies Planning a Survey Measurement Sampling Data Collection Preparing Data for Use Assessing and Improving Data Quality The SAGE Handbook of Survey Methodology is a landmark and essential tool for any scholar within the social sciences.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781473959057 20170821
Book
xvi, 429 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction 1. Social Capital in a Comparative Perspective Nan Lin, Yang-chih Fu and Chih-jou Jay Chen Part I: Measuring Social Capital 2. Contact Status and Finding a Job: Validation and Extension Nan Lin, Hang Young Lee and Dan Ao 3. Homophily and Heterophily in the Position-Generated Networks in the U.S. and China Dan Ao 4. Status-Based Differential Memory and Measurement of Social Capital: Recall Errors and Bias Estimates Kuo-Hsien Su and Nan Lin Part II: Endogeneity of Social Capital: Structural and Network Features 5. Similarities and Differences in Relation-Specific Social Resources Among Three Societies: Taiwan, China and the United States Ray-May Hsung and Ronald L. Breiger 6. How Social Capital Changes During One's Current Job: Work Conditions and Contact Patterns Yang-chih Fu, Ray May Hsung and Szu-Ying Lee 7. Occupational Sex Composition, Cultural Contexts, and Social Capital Formation: Cases of the United States and Taiwan Wei-hsin Yu and Chi-Tsun Chiu 8. The Internet Implications for Social Capital: Stock, Changes, and Tie Strength Wenhong Chen Part III: Accessing and Mobilizing Social Capital: Institutional, Networking and Organizational Factors 9. Job Search Chains and Embedded Resources: A Comparative Analysis Among Taiwan, China and the US Chih-jou Jay Chen 10. Network and Contact Diversities in Race and Gender and Status Attainment in the United States Joonmo Son 11. The Road to Democracy: A Three-Society Comparison of Civic Network Structures Yanlong Zhang and Hang Young Lee Part IV: Social Capital and Well-Being 12. Social Capital in the Workplace and Health Disruptions: A Cross-National Investigation Steve McDonald, Feinian Chen and Martha Crowley 13. Bright and Dark Sides of Who You Know in the Evaluation of Well-Being: Social Capital and Life Satisfaction Across Three Societies Lijun Song Appendix I: Social Capital USA 2004 Telephone Interview Questionnaire. Appendix II: Sample Characters for U.S., Taiwan, and China 2004-2005 Social Capital Surveys.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415899611 20160612
This volume is a collection of original studies based on one of the first research programs on comparative analysis of social capital. Data are drawn from national representative samples of the United States, China and Taiwan. The three societies selected for study allow the examination of how political-economic regimes (command versus market) and cultural factors (family centrality versus diverse social ties) affect the characteristics of social ties and social networks from which resources are accessed and mobilized.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415899611 20160612
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