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Book
viii, 344 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Communication studies and free speech law, Richard A. Parker-- Schenck v. United States and Abrams v. United States, Stephen A. Smith-- Whitney v. California, Juliet Dee-- Stromberg v. California, John S. Gossett-- Near v. Minnesota, John S. Gossett and Juliet Dee-- Chaplinsky v. New Hampshire, Dale Herbeck-- West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette, Warren Sandmann-- New York Times v. Sullivan, Nicholas F. Burnett-- United States v. O'Brien, Donald A. Fishman-- Brandenburg v. Ohio, Richard A. Parker-- Cohen v. California, Susan J. Balter-Reitz-- Kleindienst v. Mandel, Mary Elizabeth Bezanson-- Miller v. California, Joseph Tuman-- Buckley v. Valeo, Craig R. Smith-- FCC v. PacificaFoundation, R. Wilfred Tremblay-- Central Hudson Gas & Electric v. Public Service Commission, Joseph J. Hemmer Jr.-- Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, Andrew H. Utterback-- Hustler Magazine, Inc. v. Falwell, Edward C. Brewer-- Texas v. Johnson, David J. Vergobbi-- Reno v. ACLU, Douglas Fraleigh-- Conclusion, Ann M. Gill.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817313012 20160619
Describes landmark free speech decisions of the Supreme Court while highlighting the issues of language, rhetoric, and communication that underlie them. At the intersection of communication and First Amendment law reside two significant questions: What is the speech we ought to protect, and why should we protect it? The 20 scholars of legal communication whose essays are gathered in this volume propose various answers to these questions, but their essays share an abiding concern with a constitutional guarantee of free speech and its symbiotic relationship with communication practices."Free Speech on Trial" fills a gap between textbooks that summarize First Amendment law and books that analyze case law and legal theory. These essays explore questions regarding the significance of unregulated speech in a marketplace of goods and ideas, the limits of offensive language and obscenity as expression, the power of symbols, and consequences of restraint prior to publication versus the subsequent punishment of sources. As one example, Craig Smith cites "Buckley vs. Valeo" to examine how the context of corruption in the 1974 elections shaped the Court's view of the constitutionality of campaign contributions and expenditures.Collectively, the essays in this volume suggest that the life of free speech law is communication. The contributors reveal how the Court's free speech opinions constitute discursive performances that fashion, deconstruct, and reformulate the contours and parameters of the Constitution s guarantee of free expression and that, ultimately, reconstitute our government, our culture, and our society.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817313012 20160619
Law Library (Crown)
Book
258 p. ; 24 cm.
  • The purpose of press freedom
  • Editorial judgment
  • News
  • Privacy and responsibility
  • Newsgathering and press conduct
  • How free can the press be?
The First Amendment to the Constitution states that Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of the press, but the definitions of 'press', of 'freedom', and even of 'abridgment' have evolved by means of judicial rulings on cases concerning the limits and purposes of press freedoms. In "How Free Can the Press Be?" Randall P. Bezanson explores the changes in understanding of press freedom in America by discussing in depth nine of the most pivotal and provocative First Amendment cases in U.S. judicial history. These cases were argued before the U.S. Supreme Court, state Supreme Courts, and even a local circuit court, and concerned matters ranging from "The New York Times'" publication of the "Pentagon Papers" to Hugo Zacchini, the human cannonball who claimed television broadcasts of his act threatened his livelihood.Other cases include a politician blackballed by the "Miami Herald" and prevented from responding in its pages, the "Pittsburgh Press" arguing it had the right to employ gender-based column headings in its classified ads section, and the victim of a crime suing the "Des Moines Register" over that paper's publication of intimate details, including the victim's name.Each case resulted in a ruling that refined or reshaped judicial definition of the limits of press freedom. Does the First Amendment give the press a special position under the law? Is editorial judgment a cornerstone of the press? Does the press have a duty to publish truth and fact, to present both sides of a story, to respect the privacy of individuals, to obtain its information through legally acceptable means? How does press freedom weigh against national security? Bezanson addresses these and other questions, examining the arguments on both sides, and using these landmark cases as a springboard for a wider discussion of the meaning and limits of press freedom.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780252028663 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
258 p. ; 23 cm.
  • The purpose of press freedom
  • Editorial judgment
  • News
  • Privacy and responsibility
  • Newsgathering and press conduct
  • How free can the press be?
The First Amendment to the Constitution states that Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of the press, but the definitions of 'press', of 'freedom', and even of 'abridgment' have evolved by means of judicial rulings on cases concerning the limits and purposes of press freedoms. In "How Free Can the Press Be?" Randall P. Bezanson explores the changes in understanding of press freedom in America by discussing in depth nine of the most pivotal and provocative First Amendment cases in U.S. judicial history. These cases were argued before the U.S. Supreme Court, state Supreme Courts, and even a local circuit court, and concerned matters ranging from "The New York Times'" publication of the "Pentagon Papers" to Hugo Zacchini, the human cannonball who claimed television broadcasts of his act threatened his livelihood.Other cases include a politician blackballed by the "Miami Herald" and prevented from responding in its pages, the "Pittsburgh Press" arguing it had the right to employ gender-based column headings in its classified ads section, and the victim of a crime suing the "Des Moines Register" over that paper's publication of intimate details, including the victim's name.Each case resulted in a ruling that refined or reshaped judicial definition of the limits of press freedom. Does the First Amendment give the press a special position under the law? Is editorial judgment a cornerstone of the press? Does the press have a duty to publish truth and fact, to present both sides of a story, to respect the privacy of individuals, to obtain its information through legally acceptable means? How does press freedom weigh against national security? Bezanson addresses these and other questions, examining the arguments on both sides, and using these landmark cases as a springboard for a wider discussion of the meaning and limits of press freedom.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780252028663 20160528
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (2 unnumbered pages).
Law Library (Crown)
Book
266 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Corporations as speakers : Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 130 S. Ct. 876 (2010)
  • Government and its speech forum : Pleasant Grove City v. Summum, 129 S. Ct. 1125 (2009)
  • Expressive conduct unleashed : Hurley v. Irish-American Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Group of Boston, 515 U.S. 557 (1995)
  • Speech out of thin air : Boy Scouts of America v. Dale, 530 U.S. 640 (2000)
  • The secret ballot : voting as speech : Doe v. Reed, 130 S. Ct. 2811 (2010).
Randall P. Bezanson takes up an essential and timely inquiry into the Constitutional limits of the Supreme Court's power to create, interpret, and enforce one of the essential rights of American citizens. Analyzing contemporary Supreme Court decisions from the past fifteen years, Bezanson argues that judicial interpretations have fundamentally and drastically expanded the meaning and understanding of "speech." Bezanson focuses on judgments such as the much-discussed Citizens United case, which granted the full measure of constitutional protection to speech by corporations, and the Doe vs. Reed case in Washington state, which recognized the signing of petitions and voting in elections as acts of free speech. In each case study, he questions whether the meaning of speech has been expanded too far and critically assesses the Supreme Court's methodology in reaching and explaining its expansive conclusions. Randall P. Bezanson is the David H. Vernon Professor of Law at the University of Iowa and the author of Art and Freedom of Speech, How Free Can Religion Be? and How Free Can the Press Be?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780252037115 20160610
Law Library (Crown)
Book
266 p.
Randall P. Bezanson takes up an essential and timely inquiry into the Constitutional limits of the Supreme Court's power to create, interpret, and enforce one of the essential rights of American citizens. Analyzing contemporary Supreme Court decisions from the past fifteen years, Bezanson argues that judicial interpretations have fundamentally and drastically expanded the meaning and understanding of "speech." Bezanson focuses on judgments such as the much-discussed Citizens United case, which granted the full measure of constitutional protection to speech by corporations, and the Doe vs. Reed case in Washington state, which recognized the signing of petitions and voting in elections as acts of free speech. In each case study, he questions whether the meaning of speech has been expanded too far and critically assesses the Supreme Court's methodology in reaching and explaining its expansive conclusions. Randall P. Bezanson is the David H. Vernon Professor of Law at the University of Iowa and the author of Art and Freedom of Speech, How Free Can Religion Be? and How Free Can the Press Be?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780252037115 20160610
Book
xviii, 1012 p. ; 27 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 344 p. : ill.
  • Communication studies and free speech law, Richard A. Parker-- Schenck v. United States and Abrams v. United States, Stephen A. Smith-- Whitney v. California, Juliet Dee-- Stromberg v. California, John S. Gossett-- Near v. Minnesota, John S. Gossett and Juliet Dee-- Chaplinsky v. New Hampshire, Dale Herbeck-- West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette, Warren Sandmann-- New York Times v. Sullivan, Nicholas F. Burnett-- United States v. O'Brien, Donald A. Fishman-- Brandenburg v. Ohio, Richard A. Parker-- Cohen v. California, Susan J. Balter-Reitz-- Kleindienst v. Mandel, Mary Elizabeth Bezanson-- Miller v. California, Joseph Tuman-- Buckley v. Valeo, Craig R. Smith-- FCC v. PacificaFoundation, R. Wilfred Tremblay-- Central Hudson Gas & Electric v. Public Service Commission, Joseph J. Hemmer Jr.-- Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, Andrew H. Utterback-- Hustler Magazine, Inc. v. Falwell, Edward C. Brewer-- Texas v. Johnson, David J. Vergobbi-- Reno v. ACLU, Douglas Fraleigh-- Conclusion, Ann M. Gill.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817313012 20160619
Describes landmark free speech decisions of the Supreme Court while highlighting the issues of language, rhetoric, and communication that underlie them. At the intersection of communication and First Amendment law reside two significant questions: What is the speech we ought to protect, and why should we protect it? The 20 scholars of legal communication whose essays are gathered in this volume propose various answers to these questions, but their essays share an abiding concern with a constitutional guarantee of free speech and its symbiotic relationship with communication practices."Free Speech on Trial" fills a gap between textbooks that summarize First Amendment law and books that analyze case law and legal theory. These essays explore questions regarding the significance of unregulated speech in a marketplace of goods and ideas, the limits of offensive language and obscenity as expression, the power of symbols, and consequences of restraint prior to publication versus the subsequent punishment of sources. As one example, Craig Smith cites "Buckley vs. Valeo" to examine how the context of corruption in the 1974 elections shaped the Court's view of the constitutionality of campaign contributions and expenditures.Collectively, the essays in this volume suggest that the life of free speech law is communication. The contributors reveal how the Court's free speech opinions constitute discursive performances that fashion, deconstruct, and reformulate the contours and parameters of the Constitution s guarantee of free expression and that, ultimately, reconstitute our government, our culture, and our society.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817313012 20160619
Book
viii, 344 p. ; 23 cm
  • Communication studies and free speech law, Richard A. Parker-- Schenck v. United States and Abrams v. United States, Stephen A. Smith-- Whitney v. California, Juliet Dee-- Stromberg v. California, John S. Gossett-- Near v. Minnesota, John S. Gossett and Juliet Dee-- Chaplinsky v. New Hampshire, Dale Herbeck-- West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette, Warren Sandmann-- New York Times v. Sullivan, Nicholas F. Burnett-- United States v. O'Brien, Donald A. Fishman-- Brandenburg v. Ohio, Richard A. Parker-- Cohen v. California, Susan J. Balter-Reitz-- Kleindienst v. Mandel, Mary Elizabeth Bezanson-- Miller v. California, Joseph Tuman-- Buckley v. Valeo, Craig R. Smith-- FCC v. PacificaFoundation, R. Wilfred Tremblay-- Central Hudson Gas & Electric v. Public Service Commission, Joseph J. Hemmer Jr.-- Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, Andrew H. Utterback-- Hustler Magazine, Inc. v. Falwell, Edward C. Brewer-- Texas v. Johnson, David J. Vergobbi-- Reno v. ACLU, Douglas Fraleigh-- Conclusion, Ann M. Gill.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817313012 20160619
Describes landmark free speech decisions of the Supreme Court while highlighting the issues of language, rhetoric, and communication that underlie them. At the intersection of communication and First Amendment law reside two significant questions: What is the speech we ought to protect, and why should we protect it? The 20 scholars of legal communication whose essays are gathered in this volume propose various answers to these questions, but their essays share an abiding concern with a constitutional guarantee of free speech and its symbiotic relationship with communication practices."Free Speech on Trial" fills a gap between textbooks that summarize First Amendment law and books that analyze case law and legal theory. These essays explore questions regarding the significance of unregulated speech in a marketplace of goods and ideas, the limits of offensive language and obscenity as expression, the power of symbols, and consequences of restraint prior to publication versus the subsequent punishment of sources. As one example, Craig Smith cites "Buckley vs. Valeo" to examine how the context of corruption in the 1974 elections shaped the Court's view of the constitutionality of campaign contributions and expenditures.Collectively, the essays in this volume suggest that the life of free speech law is communication. The contributors reveal how the Court's free speech opinions constitute discursive performances that fashion, deconstruct, and reformulate the contours and parameters of the Constitution s guarantee of free expression and that, ultimately, reconstitute our government, our culture, and our society.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817313012 20160619
Book
xvi, 754 p. ; 26 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvi, 544 p. ; 26 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxix, 397 p. ; 26 cm.
This text brings together the Court's leading First Amendment cases, starting with Schenk v. United States (1919) and ending with Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union (1998). It also explains the Court's understanding on the First Amendment's speech, press, assembly, and petition clauses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780847697113 20160528
In Freedom of Expression in the Supreme Court, Terry Eastland brings together the Court's leading First Amendment cases, some 60 in all, starting with Schenck v. United States (1919) and ending with Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union (1998). Complete with a comprehensive introduction, pertinent indices and a useful bibliography, Freedom of Expression in the Supreme Court offers the general and specialized reader alike a thorough treatment of the Court's understanding on the First Amendment's speech, press, assembly, and petition clauses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780847697106 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
208 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
208 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvi, 700 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 245 p. 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
ix, 245 p. ; 19 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 245 p. ; 22 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxxix, 1097 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
  • Free speech : a general overview
  • Exceptions from full protection
  • Strict scrutiny
  • Content-neutral restrictions
  • Special burdens on free speech
  • Government acting in special capacities
  • Prior restraints
  • Nongovernmental speech restrictions
  • Reserved
  • The religion clause(s) : overview
  • Compelled disregard of religion?
  • Compelled exclusion of religion?
  • Compelled accommodation of religion?
  • Nongovernmental actions and religion.
This popular casebook examines the First Amendment using expertly-edited cases, summaries of the law, analysis of the structure of policy arguments, and problems for class discussion. The new edition features updated coverage of strict scrutiny, content-neutral restrictions, the government as subsidizer, the no endorsement principle, the no coercion principle, and religious exemptions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781634605106 20160808
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 186 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction
  • From silver spoon to socialism
  • Speech in the streets and at the Supreme Court
  • Anita Whitney goes to court
  • The trial continues
  • Thinking "through" free speech
  • "Public discussion is a political duty"
  • How free should speech be?
  • Epilogue
  • Bibliographical essay.
Anita Whitney was a child of wealth and privilege who became a vocal leftist, early in the twentieth century, became a vocal leftist, supporting radical labor groups such as the Wobblies and helping to organize the Communist Labor Party. In 1919 she was arrested and charged with violating California's recently passed laws banning any speech or activity intended to change the American political and economic systems. The story of the Supreme Court case that grew out of Whitney's conviction, told in full in this book, is also the story of how Americans came to enjoy the most liberal speech laws in the world. In clear and engaging language, noted legal scholar Philippa Strum traces the fateful interactions of Whitney, a descendant of Mayflower Pilgrims; Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis, a brilliant son of immigrants; the teeming immigrant neighborhoods and left wing labor politics of the early twentieth century; and the lessons some Harvard Law School professors took from World War I-era restrictions onspeech. Though the Supreme Court upheld Whitney's conviction, it included an opinion by Justice Brandeis--joined by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.- -that led to adecisive change in the way the Court understood First Amendment free speech protections. Speaking Freely takes us into the discussions behind this dramatic change, as Holmes, Brandeis, Judge Learned Hand, and Harvard Law professors Zechariah Chafee and Felix Frankfurter debate the extent of the First Amendment and the important role of free speech in a democratic society. In Brandeis's opinion, we see this debate distilled in a statement of the value of free speech and the harm that its suppression does to a democracy, along with reflections on the importance of freedom from government control for the founders and the drafters of the First Amendment. Through Whitney v. California and its legacy, Speaking Freely shows how the American approach to speech, differing as it does that of every other country, reflects the nation's unique history. Nothing less than a primer in the history of free speech rights in the US, the book offers a sobering and timely lesson as fear once more raises the specter of repression.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780700621354 20160619
Green Library

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