Book
xix, 227 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Theories of the First Amendment
  • Liberalism and the legal history of free speech
  • Agency and the evolution of First Amendment analysis
  • Rethinking hate speech: Skokie and R.A.V.
  • Virginia v. Black : an evolution in First Amendment doctrine?
  • The internet : (re)assessing the pornography question
  • Terrorism and the culture of fear
  • Conclusion: A new First Amendment emerges.
Green Library
Book
xii, 203 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction-- Part I. Defining Human Rights and Delimiting the Scope of Freedom of Expression: 1. Preliminaries: what is a human right, and what activities implicate freedom of expression?-- 2. Freedom of expression and regulations that affect messages but are not enacted for that reason-- 3. The puzzles of governmental purpose-- Part II. The Core of Freedom of Expression: Government Regulations and Acts Taken To Affect Messages: 4. The core of freedom of expression: regulations of conduct for the purpose of affecting messages received-- 5. Track three: Government speech and subsidies of speech-- 6. Miscellaneous regulations of expression-- Part III. Theoretical Perspectives on Freedom of Expression: 7. General justifying theories of freedom of expression-- 8. The paradoxes of liberalism and the failure of theories justifying a right of freedom of expression-- Epilogue: 9. Muddling through: freedom of expression in the absence of a human right.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521822930 20160528
In this provocative book, Alexander offers a sceptical appraisal of the claim that freedom of expression is a human right. He examines the various contexts in which a right to freedom of expression might be asserted and concludes that such a right cannot be supported in any of these contexts. He argues that some legal protection of freedom of expression is surely valuable, though the form such protection will take will vary with historical and cultural circumstances and is not a matter of human right. Written in a clear and accessible style, this book will appeal to students and professionals in political philosophy, law, political science, and human rights.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521822930 20160528
Green Library
Book
xii, 203 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction-- Part I. Defining Human Rights and Delimiting the Scope of Freedom of Expression: 1. Preliminaries: what is a human right, and what activities implicate freedom of expression?-- 2. Freedom of expression and regulations that affect messages but are not enacted for that reason-- 3. The puzzles of governmental purpose-- Part II. The Core of Freedom of Expression: Government Regulations and Acts Taken To Affect Messages: 4. The core of freedom of expression: regulations of conduct for the purpose of affecting messages received-- 5. Track three: Government speech and subsidies of speech-- 6. Miscellaneous regulations of expression-- Part III. Theoretical Perspectives on Freedom of Expression: 7. General justifying theories of freedom of expression-- 8. The paradoxes of liberalism and the failure of theories justifying a right of freedom of expression-- Epilogue: 9. Muddling through: freedom of expression in the absence of a human right.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521822930 20160528
In this provocative book, Alexander offers a sceptical appraisal of the claim that freedom of expression is a human right. He examines the various contexts in which a right to freedom of expression might be asserted and concludes that such a right cannot be supported in any of these contexts. He argues that some legal protection of freedom of expression is surely valuable, though the form such protection will take will vary with historical and cultural circumstances and is not a matter of human right. Written in a clear and accessible style, this book will appeal to students and professionals in political philosophy, law, political science, and human rights.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521822930 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
585 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Democracy and free expression
  • Republican democracy from the Revolution through the Civil War
  • Free expression in the early years
  • The Sedition Act controversy
  • Free expression in the nineteenth century to 1865
  • Republican democracy from Reconstruction through 1920
  • Free expression, American society, and the Supreme Court
  • Free expression during the World War I era
  • Transition to pluralist democracy
  • Pluralist democracy and judicial review
  • Free expression, pluralist democracy, and the Supreme Court
  • The traditions of dissent and suppression in the pluralist democratic regime
  • Open questions.
From the 1798 Sedition Act to the war on terror, numerous presidents, members of Congress, Supreme Court justices, and local officials have endorsed the silencing of free expression. If the connection between democracy and the freedom of speech is such a vital one, why would so many governmental leaders seek to quiet their citizens? "Free Expression and Democracy in America" traces two rival traditions in American culture - suppression of speech and dissent as a form of speech - to provide an unparalleled overview of the law, history, and politics of individual rights in the United States.Charting the course of free expression alongside the nation's political evolution, from the birth of the Constitution to the quagmire of the Vietnam War, Stephen M. Feldman argues that our level of freedom is determined not only by the Supreme Court, but also by cultural, social, and economic forces. Along the way, he pinpoints the struggles of excluded groups - women, African Americans, and laborers - to participate in democratic government as pivotal to the development of free expression. In an age when our freedom of speech is once again at risk, this momentous book will be essential reading for legal historians, political scientists, and history buffs alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226240664 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
585 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Democracy and free expression
  • Republican democracy from the Revolution through the Civil War
  • Free expression in the early years
  • The Sedition Act controversy
  • Free expression in the nineteenth century to 1865
  • Republican democracy from Reconstruction through 1920
  • Free expression, American society, and the Supreme Court
  • Free expression during the World War I era
  • Transition to pluralist democracy
  • Pluralist democracy and judicial review
  • Free expression, pluralist democracy, and the Supreme Court
  • The traditions of dissent and suppression in the pluralist democratic regime
  • Open questions.
From the 1798 Sedition Act to the war on terror, numerous presidents, members of Congress, Supreme Court justices, and local officials have endorsed the silencing of free expression. If the connection between democracy and the freedom of speech is such a vital one, why would so many governmental leaders seek to quiet their citizens? "Free Expression and Democracy in America" traces two rival traditions in American culture - suppression of speech and dissent as a form of speech - to provide an unparalleled overview of the law, history, and politics of individual rights in the United States.Charting the course of free expression alongside the nation's political evolution, from the birth of the Constitution to the quagmire of the Vietnam War, Stephen M. Feldman argues that our level of freedom is determined not only by the Supreme Court, but also by cultural, social, and economic forces. Along the way, he pinpoints the struggles of excluded groups - women, African Americans, and laborers - to participate in democratic government as pivotal to the development of free expression. In an age when our freedom of speech is once again at risk, this momentous book will be essential reading for legal historians, political scientists, and history buffs alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226240664 20160528
Book
viii, 306 p.
When it comes to questions of religion, legal scholars face a predicament. They often expect to resolve dilemmas according to general principles of equality, neutrality, or the separation of church and state. But such abstractions fail to do justice to the untidy welter of values at stake. Offering new views of how to understand and protect religious freedom in a democracy, The Tragedy of Religious Freedom challenges the idea that matters of law and religion should be referred to far-flung theories about the First Amendment. Examining a broad array of contemporary and more established Supreme Court rulings, Marc DeGirolami explains why conflicts implicating religious liberty are so emotionally fraught and deeply contested. Twenty-first-century realities of pluralism have outrun how scholars think about religious freedom, DeGirolami asserts. Scholars have not been candid enough about the tragic nature of the conflicts over religious liberty--the clash of opposing interests and aspirations they entail, and the limits of human reason to resolve intractable differences. The Tragedy of Religious Freedom seeks to turn our attention from abstracted, absolute values to concrete, historical realities. Social history, characterized by the struggles of lawyers engaged in the details of irreducible conflicts, represents the most promising avenue to negotiate legal conflicts over religion. In this volume, DeGirolami offers an approach to understanding religious liberty that is neither rigidly systematic nor ad hoc, but a middle path grounded in a pluralistic and historically informed perspective.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674072664 20160612
Book
xxxi, 1,064 p. ; 26 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 225 p. ; 27 cm.
  • Freedom of speech and press : exceptions to the First Amendment / Kathleen Ann Ruane
  • Regulation of broadcast indecency : background and legal analysts / Kathleen Ann Ruane
  • Obscenity, child pornography, and indecency : brief background and recent developments / Kathleen Ann Ruane
  • Obscenity and indecency : constitutional principles and federal statutes / Henry Cohen
  • Military personnel and freedom of religious expression : selected legal issues / R. Chuck Mason, Cynthia Brougher
  • Legal standing under the First Amendment's establishment clause / Cynthia Brougher
  • The constitutionality of regulating corporate expenditures : a brief analysis of the Supreme Court ruling in Citizens United v. FEC / L. Paige Whitaker
  • Testimony of Laurence H. Tribe, House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary, hearing on "the First Amendment and campaign finance reform after Citizens United"
  • Testimony of Monica Youn, counsel at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law, before the Committee on the Judiciary, hearing on "the First Amendment and campaign finance reform after Citizens United"
  • The constitutionality of campaign finance regulation : Buckley v. Valeo and its Supreme Court progeny / L. Paige Whitaker.
Green Library
Book
313 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Story 1. Performance art (National Endowment for the Arts v. Finley)
  • Story 2. The artistic turn? (Barnes v. Glen Theatre Inc.)
  • Story 3. Sources of expression (Boy Scouts of America v. Dale)
  • Story 4. Speaking out of thin air (Hurley v. Irish-American Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Group of Boston)
  • Story 5. Politics and community (Jenkins v. Georgia)
  • Story 6. Genre: rap and rock (Campbell [2 live crew] v. Acuff-Rose)
  • Story 7. Dangerous art (Virginia v. Black)
  • Story 8. Art and craft (J.S.G. Boggs v. Bowron)
  • Judging art and its quality: reflections on art and free speech.
This book analyzes the broad range of Supreme Court cases that concern the protection of art and free speech under the First Amendment. Finding that debates about free expression (whether in speech or art) swirl around sex and cultural blasphemy, Randall P. Bezanson tracks and interprets the Court's decisions on film, nude dancing, music, painting, and other visual expressions. Showing how the Court has dealt with judgments of art, quality, meaning, and how to distinguish types of speech and expression, Bezanson explores issues as diverse as homosexuality in the Boy Scouts, gay and lesbian parade floats, 2 Live Crew's alleged copyright infringement, National Endowment for the Arts grants and diversity, dangerous art, and screenings of the film Carnal Knowledge.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780252034435 20160528
Green Library
Book
313 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Performance art : National Endowment for the Arts v. Finley
  • The artistic turn? Barnes v. Glen Theatre Inc.
  • Sources of expression : Boy Scouts of America v. Dale
  • Speaking out of thin air : Hurley v. Irish-American Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Group of Boston
  • Politics and community : Jenkins v. Georgia
  • Genre : rap and rock : Campbell [2 Live Crew] v. Acuff-Rose
  • Dangerous art : Virginia v. Black
  • Art and craft : J.S.G. Boggs v. Bowron
  • Judging art and its quality : reflections on art and free speech.
This book analyzes the broad range of Supreme Court cases that concern the protection of art and free speech under the First Amendment. Finding that debates about free expression (whether in speech or art) swirl around sex and cultural blasphemy, Randall P. Bezanson tracks and interprets the Court's decisions on film, nude dancing, music, painting, and other visual expressions. Showing how the Court has dealt with judgments of art, quality, meaning, and how to distinguish types of speech and expression, Bezanson explores issues as diverse as homosexuality in the Boy Scouts, gay and lesbian parade floats, 2 Live Crew's alleged copyright infringement, National Endowment for the Arts grants and diversity, dangerous art, and screenings of the film Carnal Knowledge.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780252034435 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
172 p. ; 21 cm.
  • The romantic conscience
  • Liberty of conscience
  • Liberty of conscience and the U.S. constitutional archives.
Should the choice to engage in a faculty-student romance be protected or precluded? An argument that the right to choose a romantic partner is a fundamental right of conscience, protected by the U.S Constitution.Allen Ginsberg once declared that "the best teaching is done in bed, " but most university administrators would presumably disagree. Many universities prohibit romantic relationships between faculty members and students, and professors who transgress are usually out of a job. In "Romance in the Ivory Tower", Paul Abramson takes aim at university policies that forbid relationships between faculty members and students. He argues provocatively that the issue of faculty-student romances transcends the seemingly trivial matter of who sleeps with whom and engages our fundamental constitutional rights.By what authority, Abramson asks, did the university become the arbiter of romantic etiquette among consenting adults? Do we, as consenting adults, have a constitutional right to make intimate choices as long as they do not cause harm? Abramson contends that we do, and bases this claim on two arguments. He suggests that the Ninth Amendment (which states that the Constitution's enumeration of certain rights should not be construed to deny others) protects the "right to romance." And, more provocatively, he argues that the "right to romance" is a fundamental right of conscience - as are freedom of speech and freedom of religion.Campus romances happen. The important question is not whether they should be encouraged or prohibited but whether the choice to engage in such a relationship should be protected or precluded. Abramson argues ringingly that our freedom to make choices - to worship, make a political speech, or fall in love - is fundamental. Rules forbidding faculty-student romances are not only unconstitutional but set dangerous precedents for further intrusion into rights of privacy and conscience.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262012379 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
172 p. ; 21 cm.
  • The romantic conscience
  • Liberty of conscience
  • Liberty of conscience and the U.S. constitutional archives
  • Conclusion: All we need is love (love is all we need).
Should the choice to engage in a faculty-student romance be protected or precluded? An argument that the right to choose a romantic partner is a fundamental right of conscience, protected by the U.S Constitution.Allen Ginsberg once declared that "the best teaching is done in bed, " but most university administrators would presumably disagree. Many universities prohibit romantic relationships between faculty members and students, and professors who transgress are usually out of a job. In "Romance in the Ivory Tower", Paul Abramson takes aim at university policies that forbid relationships between faculty members and students. He argues provocatively that the issue of faculty-student romances transcends the seemingly trivial matter of who sleeps with whom and engages our fundamental constitutional rights.By what authority, Abramson asks, did the university become the arbiter of romantic etiquette among consenting adults? Do we, as consenting adults, have a constitutional right to make intimate choices as long as they do not cause harm? Abramson contends that we do, and bases this claim on two arguments. He suggests that the Ninth Amendment (which states that the Constitution's enumeration of certain rights should not be construed to deny others) protects the "right to romance." And, more provocatively, he argues that the "right to romance" is a fundamental right of conscience - as are freedom of speech and freedom of religion.Campus romances happen. The important question is not whether they should be encouraged or prohibited but whether the choice to engage in such a relationship should be protected or precluded. Abramson argues ringingly that our freedom to make choices - to worship, make a political speech, or fall in love - is fundamental. Rules forbidding faculty-student romances are not only unconstitutional but set dangerous precedents for further intrusion into rights of privacy and conscience.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262012379 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxxi, 976 p. ; 26 cm.
Ideas of the First Amendment is organized for a course centered on the leading thinkers in the tradition, the brilliant and colorful dissenters, political leaders, and judges who collectively gave us the First Amendment as we know it, while covering each of the conventional doctrinal First Amendment topics. Topics covered in Ideas of the First Amendment include: advocacy of revolution, libel, obscenity, campaign finance, hate speech, internet regulation, the public forum, subsidies, fighting words, compelled speech and association, publishing classified documents, flagburning, commercial speech, indecency, free speech in wartime.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780314163615 20160527
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vi, 162 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Categorical exceptions to First Amendment protections
  • How government restricts speech
  • Government in special roles
  • Political speech and association
  • The internet and new media
  • Freedom of the press and other enhanced protections
  • Free exercise
  • Establishment clause
  • Final words.
This concise guide breaks down a complicated topic-the First Amendment-and makes it understandable and fun. The book walks briskly through cases, rules, and theories to draw a reader-friendly road map of the First Amendment. Two law school deans and First Amendment enthusiasts, Bob Power and Mark Alexander, synthesize principles with memorable examples and a sharp wit. Their analysis reveals the common sense behind much First Amendment law, and at the same time identifies some of its flaws and inconsistencies. The book addresses the deep historic roots as well as current problems such as campaign finance, hate speech, and electronic communications. It is equally useful as a general guide as it is for preparing for class and for exams (including the bar!).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781634602587 20160619
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (320 pages).

16. Freedom from speech [2014]

Book
61 pages ; 18 cm.
This is a surreal time for freedom of speech. While the legal protections of the First Amendment remain strong, the culture is obsessed with punishing individuals for allegedly offensive utterances. And academia -- already an institution in which free speech is in decline -- has grown still more intolerant, with high-profile "disinvitation" efforts against well-known speakers and demands for professors to provide "trigger warnings" in class. In this Broadside, Greg Lukianoff argues that the threats to free speech go well beyond political correctness or liberal groupthink. As global populations increasingly expect not just physical comfort but also intellectual comfort, threats to freedom of speech are only going to become more intense. To fight back, we must understand this trend and see how students and average citizens alike are increasingly demanding freedom from speech.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781594038075 20160616
Law Library (Crown)
Book
79 pages ; 26 cm
  • Food and communication : an overview / Barry Brummett
  • A famine of words : changing the rules of expression in the food debates / Stephanie Houston Grey
  • Big ag gags the freedom of expression / Joshua Frye
  • Commercial free speech trumps the politics of food labeling : the legacy of rbST-free milk mandate and prohibition cases for genetic engineering disclosure laws / G.L. Keel
  • The petition clause and food advocacy / Michael S. Bruner, Laura K. Hahn & Nicole B. Sheldon.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
pages 985-1405 : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • Legitimacy and autonomy : values of the speaking state / Frank I. Michelman
  • Freedom of expression and the golden mean / Steven G. Calabresi
  • Democratic rhetoric : how should the state speak? / Josiah Ober
  • You're all individuals : Brettschneider on free speech / Andrew Koppelman
  • Liberty, equality, and state responsibilities : review of Corey Brettschneider's when the state speaks, what should it say? / Robin West
  • The liberal tightrope : Brettschneider on free speech / Sarah Song
  • Democratic persuasion and freedom of speech : a response to four critics and two allies / Corey Brettschneider
  • Discovery and darkness : the information deficit in criminal disputes / Ion Meyn
  • Cruel and invisible punishment : redeeming the counter-majoritarian Eighth Amendment / Aliza Cover
  • "Good fences make good neighbors" : an environmental justice framework to protect prohibition beyond reservation borders / Sean J. Wright.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 473 pages ; 25 cm
  • Introduction
  • The vice of censorship
  • The United States and the world
  • The First Amendment and national security
  • Presidents vs. the First Amendment
  • On libel and privacy
  • Copyright woes
  • Confidential sources
  • Citizens United
  • Assessing the press
  • Reflections.
Since 1971, when the Pentagon Papers were leaked to the New York Times and furious debate over First Amendment rights ensued, free-speech cases have emerged in rapid succession. Floyd Abrams has been on the front lines of nearly every one of these major cases, which is also to say that, more than any other person, he has forged this country's legal understanding of free speech. Litigating everything from national-security and prior-restraint issues to controversies concerning the law of libel and attempts by local officials to censor art, Abrams has worked devotedly to protect the First Amendment, the "crown jewel" of America's Constitution. This collection of Abrams's writings gathers speeches, articles, debates, briefs, oral arguments, and testimony from his entire career. The writings illuminate topics of ongoing import: WikiLeaks, the correctness of the Citizens United case, journalist shield laws, and, not least, the responsibilities of the press. An exceptional writer and a brilliant thinker, Abrams offers a unique perspective on the First Amendment and the unparalleled rights it confers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300190878 20160612
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 473 pages ; 24 cm
  • The vice of censorship
  • The United States and the world
  • The First Amendment and national security
  • Presidents vs. the First Amendment
  • On libel and privacy
  • Copyright woes
  • Confidential sources
  • Citizens united
  • Assessing the press
  • Reflections.
Since 1971, when the Pentagon Papers were leaked to the New York Times and furious debate over First Amendment rights ensued, free-speech cases have emerged in rapid succession. Floyd Abrams has been on the front lines of nearly every one of these major cases, which is also to say that, more than any other person, he has forged this country's legal understanding of free speech. Litigating everything from national-security and prior-restraint issues to controversies concerning the law of libel and attempts by local officials to censor art, Abrams has worked devotedly to protect the First Amendment, the "crown jewel" of America's Constitution. This collection of Abrams's writings gathers speeches, articles, debates, briefs, oral arguments, and testimony from his entire career. The writings illuminate topics of ongoing import: WikiLeaks, the correctness of the Citizens United case, journalist shield laws, and, not least, the responsibilities of the press. An exceptional writer and a brilliant thinker, Abrams offers a unique perspective on the First Amendment and the unparalleled rights it confers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300190878 20160612
Green Library

Looking for different results?

Modify your search: Search all fields Search without "and" "of" "the"

Search elsewhere: Search WorldCat Search library website