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Book
iv, 232 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 180 p. : 23 cm.
  • 1 Purpose and Operation of the Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee.- 2 Guaranty of Deposits Under the Banking Act of 1933.- 3 Restructuring Banking: The Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee's Program for Banking Reform.- 4 Market-Value Accounting by Banks: Benefits, Costs and Incentives.- 5 The Savings and Loan Rescue of 1989: Causes and Perspectives.- 6 Never Again: The S & L Bailout Bill.- 7 The Collapse of the Texas Thrift Industry: Causes of the Problem and Implications for Reform.- 8 Defective Regulatory Incentives and the Bush Initiative.- 9 The Need For Timely and Accurate Measures of Federal Deposit Insurers' Net Reserve Position.- 10 Regulatory Reform of Securities and Futures Markets: Two Years After the Crash.- Statement of Purpose.- List of Members.- List of Policy Statements.- Policy Statement No. 26.- Policy Statement No. 36.- Policy Statement No. 39.- Policy Statement No. 41.- Policy Statement No. 43.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780792390732 20160605
In light of the periodic malfunctions in important sectors of the finan- cial services industry in recent years, such as commercial banking, thrift institutions, and the securities market, numerous proposals have been developed for restructuring the financial system to improve both its safety and efficiency. Among the groups analyzing the performance of the financial system and recommending changes where necessary, has been the Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee. This Committee, which is described in greater detail in Chapter 1, consists of 12 independent banking experts from the academic and practitioner worlds that meet quarterly to analyze current developments in the financial services indus- try and to make recommendations for improvements that would be in the public interest. The purpose of the Committee, its members, and a listing of policy statements are included in the Appendix. All but one of the chapters in this volume represent essays by indi- vidual members of the Committee on issues discussed by the Committee at recent meetings and that, for the most part, resulted in policy state- ments. They basically discuss the reasons for the policy statement adopted and place the issue in perspective. Where appropriate, the rele- vant section of the respective policy statement is presented at the begin- ning of each chapter. Each essay, however, reflects only the views of the individual author and not necessarily those of other members of the Committee or of the Committee as a whole.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780792390732 20160605
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
105 p. : ill ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 398 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • The emperors of banking have no clothes
  • How borrowing magnifies risk
  • The dark side of borrowing
  • Is it really "a wonderful life"?
  • Banking dominos
  • What can be done?
  • Is equity expensive?
  • Paid to gamble
  • Sweet subsidies
  • Must banks borrow so much?
  • If not now, when?
  • The politics of banking
  • Other people's money.
What is wrong with today's banking system? The past few years have shown that risks in banking can impose significant costs on the economy. Many claim, however, that a safer banking system would require sacrificing lending and economic growth. The Bankers' New Clothes examines this claim and the narratives used by bankers, politicians, and regulators to rationalize the lack of reform, exposing them as invalid. Admati and Hellwig argue we can have a safer and healthier banking system without sacrificing any of the benefits of the system, and at essentially no cost to society. They show that banks are as fragile as they are not because they must be, but because they want to be--and they get away with it. Whereas this situation benefits bankers, it distorts the economy and exposes the public to unnecessary risks. Weak regulation and ineffective enforcement allowed the buildup of risks that ushered in the financial crisis of 2007-2009. Much can be done to create a better system and prevent crises. Yet the lessons from the crisis have not been learned. Admati and Hellwig seek to engage the broader public in the debate by cutting through the jargon of banking, clearing the fog of confusion, and presenting the issues in simple and accessible terms. The Bankers' New Clothes calls for ambitious reform and outlines specific and highly beneficial steps that can be taken immediately.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691156842 20160610
Business Library
Book
xv, 398 pages ; 24 cm
  • The emperors of banking have no clothes
  • How borrowing magnifies risk
  • The dark side of borrowing
  • Is it really "a wonderful life"?
  • Banking dominos
  • What can be done?
  • Is equity expensive?
  • Paid to gamble
  • Sweet subsidies
  • Must banks borrow so much?
  • If not now, when?
  • The politics of banking
  • Other people's money.
What is wrong with today's banking system? The past few years have shown that risks in banking can impose significant costs on the economy. Many claim, however, that a safer banking system would require sacrificing lending and economic growth. The Bankers' New Clothes examines this claim and the narratives used by bankers, politicians, and regulators to rationalize the lack of reform, exposing them as invalid. Admati and Hellwig argue we can have a safer and healthier banking system without sacrificing any of the benefits of the system, and at essentially no cost to society. They show that banks are as fragile as they are not because they must be, but because they want to be--and they get away with it. Whereas this situation benefits bankers, it distorts the economy and exposes the public to unnecessary risks. Weak regulation and ineffective enforcement allowed the buildup of risks that ushered in the financial crisis of 2007-2009. Much can be done to create a better system and prevent crises. Yet the lessons from the crisis have not been learned. Admati and Hellwig seek to engage the broader public in the debate by cutting through the jargon of banking, clearing the fog of confusion, and presenting the issues in simple and accessible terms. The Bankers' New Clothes calls for ambitious reform and outlines specific and highly beneficial steps that can be taken immediately.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691156842 20160610
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 398 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Preface ix Acknowledgments xiii 1 The Emperors of Banking Have No Clothes 1 PART I Borrowing, Banking, and Risk 15 2 How Borrowing Magnifies Risk 17 3 The Dark Side of Borrowing 32 4 Is It Really "A Wonderful Life"? 46 5 Banking Dominos 60 PART II The Case for More Bank Equity 79 6 What Can Be Done? 81 7 Is Equity Expensive? 100 8 Paid to Gamble 115 9 Sweet Subsidies 129 10 Must Banks Borrow So Much? 148 PART III Moving Forward 167 11 If Not Now, When? 169 12 The Politics of Banking 192 13 Other People's Money 208 Notes 229 References 337 Index 363.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691156842 20160610
What is wrong with today's banking system? The past few years have shown that risks in banking can impose significant costs on the economy. Many claim, however, that a safer banking system would require sacrificing lending and economic growth. The Bankers' New Clothes examines this claim and the narratives used by bankers, politicians, and regulators to rationalize the lack of reform, exposing them as invalid. Admati and Hellwig argue we can have a safer and healthier banking system without sacrificing any of the benefits of the system, and at essentially no cost to society. They show that banks are as fragile as they are not because they must be, but because they want to be--and they get away with it. Whereas this situation benefits bankers, it distorts the economy and exposes the public to unnecessary risks. Weak regulation and ineffective enforcement allowed the buildup of risks that ushered in the financial crisis of 2007-2009. Much can be done to create a better system and prevent crises. Yet the lessons from the crisis have not been learned. Admati and Hellwig seek to engage the broader public in the debate by cutting through the jargon of banking, clearing the fog of confusion, and presenting the issues in simple and accessible terms. The Bankers' New Clothes calls for ambitious reform and outlines specific and highly beneficial steps that can be taken immediately.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691156842 20160610
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (421 pages)
  • Preface to the Paperback Edition ix Preface xiii Acknowledgments xvii 1The Emperors of Banking Have No Clothes 1 PART I Borrowing, Banking, and Risk 15 2How Borrowing Magnifies Risk 17 3The Dark Side of Borrowing 32 4Is It Really "A Wonderful Life"? 46 5Banking Dominos 60 PART II The Case for More Bank Equity 79 6What Can Be Done? 81 7Is Equity Expensive? 100 8Paid to Gamble 115 9Sweet Subsidies 129 10Must Banks Borrow So Much? 148 PART III Moving Forward 167 11If Not Now, When? 169 12The Politics of Banking 192 13Other People's Money 208 Notes 229 References 337 Index 363.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691162386 20180530
The past few years have shown that risks in banking can impose significant costs on the economy. Many claim, however, that a safer banking system would require sacrificing lending and economic growth. The Bankers' New Clothes examines this claim and the narratives used by bankers, politicians, and regulators to rationalize the lack of reform, exposing them as invalid. Anat Admati and Martin Hellwig argue that we can have a safer and healthier banking system without sacrificing any of its benefits, and at essentially no cost to society. They seek to engage the broader public in the debate by cutting through the jargon of banking, clearing the fog of confusion, and presenting the issues in simple and accessible terms.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691162386 20180530
Book
1 online resource (421 pages)
  • Preface to the Paperback Edition ix Preface xiii Acknowledgments xvii 1The Emperors of Banking Have No Clothes 1 PART I Borrowing, Banking, and Risk 15 2How Borrowing Magnifies Risk 17 3The Dark Side of Borrowing 32 4Is It Really "A Wonderful Life"? 46 5Banking Dominos 60 PART II The Case for More Bank Equity 79 6What Can Be Done? 81 7Is Equity Expensive? 100 8Paid to Gamble 115 9Sweet Subsidies 129 10Must Banks Borrow So Much? 148 PART III Moving Forward 167 11If Not Now, When? 169 12The Politics of Banking 192 13Other People's Money 208 Notes 229 References 337 Index 363.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691162386 20180530
The past few years have shown that risks in banking can impose significant costs on the economy. Many claim, however, that a safer banking system would require sacrificing lending and economic growth. The Bankers' New Clothes examines this claim and the narratives used by bankers, politicians, and regulators to rationalize the lack of reform, exposing them as invalid. Anat Admati and Martin Hellwig argue that we can have a safer and healthier banking system without sacrificing any of its benefits, and at essentially no cost to society. They seek to engage the broader public in the debate by cutting through the jargon of banking, clearing the fog of confusion, and presenting the issues in simple and accessible terms.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691162386 20180530
Stanford Libraries
ECON-143-02, MS&E-147-02, POLISCI-127A-02, PUBLPOL-143-02
Book
v, 31 p. : port. ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 621 p. ; ill. ; 27 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
423 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Part I: The financial environment. Introduction ; The economics of financial intermediation and innovations ; Interest rates and term structure of interest rates
  • Part II: Banking and other depository institutions. Banks ; Rural and community banks ; Saving and loans institutions and credit unions ; Central bank and monetary policy
  • Part III: Non-bank and non-depository institutions. Insurance companies and pension funds ; Finance companies and investment companies ; Investment banks and securities companies
  • Part IV: Debt security markets. Money markets ; Bond markets ; Mortgage markets
  • Part V: Equity markets. Equity markets
  • Part VI: Foreign exchange and derivatives markets. Foreign exchange markets ; Derivative securities markets.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
284 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 642 pages ; 25 cm
Guiding principles for ensuring that central bankers and other unelected policymakers remain stewards of the common good Central bankers have emerged from the financial crisis as the third great pillar of unelected power alongside the judiciary and the military. They pull the regulatory and financial levers of our economic well-being, yet unlike democratically elected leaders, their power does not come directly from the people. Unelected Power lays out the principles needed to ensure that central bankers, technocrats, regulators, and other agents of the administrative state remain stewards of the common good and do not become overmighty citizens. Paul Tucker draws on a wealth of personal experience from his many years in domestic and international policymaking to tackle the big issues raised by unelected power, and enriches his discussion with examples from the United States, Britain, France, Germany, and the European Union. Blending economics, political theory, and public law, Tucker explores the necessary conditions for delegated but politically insulated power to be legitimate in the eyes of constitutional democracy and the rule of law. He explains why the solution must fit with how real-world government is structured, and why technocrats and their political overseers need incentives to make the system work as intended. Tucker explains how the regulatory state need not be a fourth branch of government free to steer by its own lights, and how central bankers can emulate the best of judicial self-restraint and become models of dispersed power. Like it or not, unelected power has become a hallmark of modern government. This critically important book shows how to harness it to the people's purposes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691176734 20180611
Green Library
Book
xii, 642 pages ; 25 cm
Guiding principles for ensuring that central bankers and other unelected policymakers remain stewards of the common good Central bankers have emerged from the financial crisis as the third great pillar of unelected power alongside the judiciary and the military. They pull the regulatory and financial levers of our economic well-being, yet unlike democratically elected leaders, their power does not come directly from the people. Unelected Power lays out the principles needed to ensure that central bankers, technocrats, regulators, and other agents of the administrative state remain stewards of the common good and do not become overmighty citizens. Paul Tucker draws on a wealth of personal experience from his many years in domestic and international policymaking to tackle the big issues raised by unelected power, and enriches his discussion with examples from the United States, Britain, France, Germany, and the European Union. Blending economics, political theory, and public law, Tucker explores the necessary conditions for delegated but politically insulated power to be legitimate in the eyes of constitutional democracy and the rule of law. He explains why the solution must fit with how real-world government is structured, and why technocrats and their political overseers need incentives to make the system work as intended. Tucker explains how the regulatory state need not be a fourth branch of government free to steer by its own lights, and how central bankers can emulate the best of judicial self-restraint and become models of dispersed power. Like it or not, unelected power has become a hallmark of modern government. This critically important book shows how to harness it to the people's purposes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691176734 20180611
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 273 pages ; 24 cm.
  • The changing regulatory environment governing financial and economic crimes
  • The compliance of worldwide banking systems with evolving international regulatory and supervisory requirements : facts, challenges, and implications
  • The causes and origins of banking crises : a review and critique of theory and evidence
  • Bank lending during the financial crisis of 2008 : an empirical investigation
  • Corporate governance in the banking industry and Basel III challenges and implications
  • Monetary policy in an era of quantitative easing
  • Monetary policy in an era of monetary unions, and central banks' holdings of foreign reserves.
The 21st century witnessed major changes in the financial environment surrounding bank regulators and banks. Banking and Monetary Policies in a Changing Financial Environment delves into three of these developments and challenges. The first change in the financial environment relates to the rise in the number and sophistication of financial and economic crimes which shaped the international regulatory architecture. New rules and regulations led to the creation of new strategies to combat these crimes, especially those concerning the spread of more advanced money laundering methods and techniques, terrorist financing after the 9/11 attacks, and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The second development concerns the global financial crisis of 2008 which drastically affected the regulatory environment of various international and domestic financial authorities causing major changes in bank lending and corporate governance policies, and in the development of the Basel III accord on capital adequacy for bank supervision. The third development manifests itself in the creation of a major European monetary union without a fiscal union and a giant European central bank impacting the conduct of monetary policy. This book combines theory, policy, regulation and institutional approaches with empirical testing, analyzing applications and case studies of various international regulatory authorities and administrations, countries and jurisdictions, central banks and commercial banks. This volume is suitable for those who study international finance, Banking and white collar crime.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138913530 20170306
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 273 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • * Introduction Part 1: Banking Regulation to Combat the Rise in Financial and Economic Crimes * The Changing Regulatory Environment Governing Financial and Economic Crimes * Compliance of Worldwide Banking Systems with Evolving International Regulatory and Supervisory Requirements: Facts, Challenges and Implications Part 2: New Policies in the Wake of the Latest Financial Crisis * Causes and Origins of Banking Crises: Review and Critique of Theory and Evidence * Bank Lending During the Financial Crisis of 2008: An Empirical Investigation * Corporate Governance in the Banking Industry and Basel III Challenges and Implications Part 3: Central Banks in the New Era of Quantitative Easing, Monetary Unions without Fiscal Unions and the Holdings of Foreign Reserves * Monetary Policy in an Era of Quantitative Easing * Monetary Policy in an Era of Monetary Unions, and Central Banks' Holdings of Foreign Reserves * Concluding Remarks and Policy Implications.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138913530 20161128
The 21st century witnessed major changes in the financial environment surrounding bank regulators and banks. Banking and Monetary Policies in a Changing Financial Environment delves into three of these developments and challenges. The first change in the financial environment relates to the rise in the number and sophistication of financial and economic crimes which shaped the international regulatory architecture. New rules and regulations led to the creation of new strategies to combat these crimes, especially those concerning the spread of more advanced money laundering methods and techniques, terrorist financing after the 9/11 attacks, and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The second development concerns the global financial crisis of 2008 which drastically affected the regulatory environment of various international and domestic financial authorities causing major changes in bank lending and corporate governance policies, and in the development of the Basel III accord on capital adequacy for bank supervision. The third development manifests itself in the creation of a major European monetary union without a fiscal union and a giant European central bank impacting the conduct of monetary policy. This book combines theory, policy, regulation and institutional approaches with empirical testing, analyzing applications and case studies of various international regulatory authorities and administrations, countries and jurisdictions, central banks and commercial banks. This volume is suitable for those who study international finance, Banking and white collar crime.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138913530 20161128
Green Library

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