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Book
107 p. ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiv, 428 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
This study demonstrates that long-term experimentation and monitoring are important in understanding changes that are occurring in the environment and the way they interact with agriculture and natural ecosystems.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780851989334 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
23 pages.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
158 p.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
  • Pt. 1. Coral reef fish and fisheries of the Caribbean Sea / by J.L. Munro
  • Pt. 2. The Jamaican fishing industry, the area investigated, and the objectives and methodology of the ODA/UWI Fisheries Ecology Research Project / by J.L. Munro & R. Thompson
  • Pt. 3. The composition & magnitude of line catches in Jamaican waters / by J.L. Munro
  • Pt. 4. The composition and magnitude of trap catches in Jamaican waters / by J.L. Munro
  • Pt. 5a. The biology, ecology and bionomics of Caribbean reef fishes: Holocentridae (squirrelfishes) / by John K. Wyatt
  • Pt. 5b. The biology, ecology and bionomics of Caribbean reef fishes: Serranidae (hinds and groupers) / by R. Thompson & J.L. Munro
  • Pt. 5c. The biology, ecology and bionomics of Caribbean reef fishes: Carangidae (jacks) / by R. Thompson & J.L. Munro
  • Pt. 5d. The biology, ecology & bionomics of Caribbean reef fishes Lutjanidae (snappers) / by R. Thompson & J.L. Munro
  • Pt. 5d. The biology, ecology and bionomics of Caribbean reef fishes : pomadasyidae (grunts) / by V. C. Billings (Nee Gaut) & J. L. Munro.
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
221 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
Pages: 129 : digital, PDF file.
Book
xxvi, 566 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Contributors.Abbreviations.Introduction.1. Stable isotope chemistry and measurement: a primer. Elizabeth W. Sulzman.Introduction.What isotopes are, what makes them distinct.Properties of ecologically useful stable isotopes.Technological advances and current trends in the ecological use of isotopes.Acknowledgments.References.2. Sources of variation in the stable isotopic composition of plants. John D. Marshall, J. Renee Brooks, and Kate Lajtha.Introduction.Carbon isotopes.Nitrogen isotopes.Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes.Conclusions.References.3. Natural 15N- and 13C-abundance as indicators of forest nitrogen status and soil carbon dynamics. Charles T. Garten, Jr, Paul J. Hanson, Donald E. Todd, Jr, Bonnie B. Lau, and Deanne J. Brice.Introduction.Significance of 15N-abundance to soil carbon sequestration.Vertical changes in soil 13C-abundance and soil carbon dynamics.Conclusions.Acknowledgments.References.4. Soil nitrogen isotope composition. R. Dave Evans.Introduction.Sources of variation in soil 15N.Patterns of soil nitrogen isotope composition.Conclusions.References.5. Isotopic study of the biology of modern and fossil vertebrates. Paul L. Koch.Introduction.Vertebrate tissues in the fossil record.Controls on the isotopic composition of vertebrate tissues.Preservation of biogenic isotope compositions by vertebrate fossils.Paleobiological applications.Conclusions.A post-script on workshops and literature resources.References.6. Isotopic tracking of migrant wildlife. Keith A. Hobson.Introduction.Basic principles.Marine systems.Terrestrial systems (excluding deuterium).Using deuterium patterns in precipitation.Conclusions.References.7. Natural abundance of 15N in marine planktonic ecosystems. Joseph P. Montoya.Introduction.Background.Isotopic variation in marine nitrogen.Source delineation and isotope budgets.Animal fractionation and food web processes.Isotopic transients in marine systems.Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analyses.Conclusions.Acknowledgment.References.8. Stable isotope studies in marine chemoautotrophically based ecosystems: An update. Cindy Lee Van Dover.Introduction.Isotopic tracing of carbon at methane seeps.Whale falls.Hydrothermal vents.Conclusions.References.9. Stable isotope ratios as tracers in marine food webs: An update. Robert H. Michener and Les Kaufman.Introduction.Methods of assessing food webs.Phytoplankton and particulate organic carbon.Phytoplankton and particulate organic nitrogen.Marine food webs.Stable isotopes in marine conservation biology.Conclusions.Acknowledgments.References.10. Stable isotope tracing of temporal and spatial variability in organic matter sources to freshwater ecosystems. Jacques C. Finlay and Carol Kendall.Introduction.Overview of river food webs and stable isotope approaches.Stable isotope ratios of organic matter sources in stream ecosystems.C, N, and S isotopic variability and its applications in river ecology.Conclusions.Acknowledgments.References.11. Stable isotope tracers in watershed hydrology. Kevin J. McGuire and Jeff McDonnell.Introduction.Basic concepts in watershed hydrology.Why are stable isotopes needed?.General concepts in isotope hydrology.Applications of isotope hydrology in watershed and ecosystem studies.Conclusions.Acknowledgments.References.12. Tracing anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen to ecosystems. Carol Kendall, Emily M. Elliott, and Scott D. Wankel.Introduction.Isotopic compositions of major N sources to ecosystems.Processes affecting the isotopic composition of DIN.Separating mixing of sources from the effects of cycling.Applications to different environmental settings.What sources of agricultural and urban sources of nitrate can be distinguished using isotopes?.Other tools for tracing anthropogenic contaminants.Conclusions.References.13. Modeling the dynamics of stable-isotope ratios for ecosystem biogeochemistry. William S. Currie.Introduction.Designing consistent model-data linkages and comparisons.Principles and techniques of stable isotope modeling.Conclusions.Acknowledgments.References.14. Compound-specific stable isotope analysis in ecology and paleoecology. Richard P. Evershed, Ian D. Bull, Lorna T. Corr, Zoe M. Crossman, Bart E. van Dongen, Claire Evans, Susan Jim, Hazel Mottram, Anna J. Mukherjee, and Richard D. Pancost.Introduction.Why use compound-specific stable isotopes?.Analytical considerations in compound-specific stable isotope analysis.Applications of compound-specific stable isotope approaches in ecology and paleoecology.Conclusions.References.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405126809 20160528
This book highlights new and emerging uses of stable isotope analysis in a variety of ecological disciplines. While the use of natural abundance isotopes in ecological research is now relatively standard, new techniques and ways of interpreting patterns are developing rapidly. The second edition of this book provides a thorough, up-to-date examination of these methods of research. As part of the "Ecological Methods and Concepts" series which provides the latest information on experimental techniques in ecology, this book looks at a wide range of techniques that use natural abundance isotopes to: follow whole ecosystem element cycling; understand processes of soil organic matter formation; follow the movement of water in whole watersheds; understand the effects of pollution in both terrestrial and aquatic environments; study extreme systems such as hydrothermal vents; and, follow migrating organisms.In each case, the book explains the background to the methodology, looks at the underlying principles and assumptions, and outlines the potential limitations and pitfalls. "Stable Isotopes in Ecology and Environmental Science" is an ideal resource for both ecologists who are new to isotopic analysis, and more experienced isotope ecologists interested in innovative techniques and pioneering new uses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405126809 20160528
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
xii, 308 p. : ill. ; 25 cm. + 1 computer optical disc (4 3/4 in.)
  • Introduction.- Isotope Notation and Measurement.- Using Stable Isotope Tracers.- Isotope Chi (?I Chi?).- Mixing.- Isotope Additions.- Fractionation.- Scanning the Future.- Appendix.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780387305134 20160528
Stable isotopes are frequently used as tracers in biological systems, and their ability to track changes and processes over time has made them increasingly important to ecological research. For ecologists, stable isotopes provide a natural way to directly trace details of element cycling in the environment. "Stable Isotope Ecology" provides a solid introduction to this advanced subject, and can also be used as an instructive review for more experienced researchers and professionals. The book approaches the use of isotopes from the perspective of ecological and biological research, but its concepts can be applied within other disciplines as well. In order to enable scientists to establish source-sink connections in ecological settings, "Stable Isotope Ecology" begins by reviewing fundamental topics of tracer fractionation and mixing.Several mini-reviews profile problems and successes encountered with isotope tracing in particular focus areas, while emphasizing the role that humans increasingly play in changing our planetary ecosphere. A novel, step-by-step spreadsheet modeling approach is also presented for circulating tracers in any ecological system, including any favorite system an ecologist might dream up while sitting at a computer. Just type in values and watch the isotope action unfold in the dynamic models. Fry's humorous and lighthearted style painlessly imparts the principles of isotope ecology, using a unique, hands-on approach to engage students. The mechanics of fractionation and mixing are laid out in simple steps, with numerous examples and accessible mathematics (algebra only). The book encourages students to begin their own pilot project with stable isotopes.The attached CD-ROM contains color illustrations, spreadsheet models, technical appendices, and problems and answers. The CD materials are accessible for novices and experts alike, and enhance the learning experience, adding electronic dynamics to the printed book. About the Author: Dr. Brian Fry is a Professor in the Coastal Ecology Institute and the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Studies at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. His mother and father both used isotopes in their research careers, so he is a second generation isotope scientist.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780387305134 20160528
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
xix, 316 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Sources Of Variation In The Stable Isotopic Composition Of Plants Nitrogen Isotope Studies In Forest Ecosystems Pollution Studies Using Stable Isotopes Tracing The Diets Of Fossil Animals Using Stable Isotopes CO2, CO And CH4 In The Atmosphere: Abundance And Isotopic Composition The Use Of Stable Isotopes For The Study Of Gaseous Nitrogen Species In Marine Environments Stable Isotope Ratios As Tracers In Marine Aquatic Food Webs Stable Isotopes In The Study Of Marine Chemosynthetic-Based Ecosystems Physiology Of Isotope Fractionation In Algae And Cyanobacteria The Use Of Stable Carbon Isotopes To Study Microbial Processes In Estuaries Compound Specific Approaches Using Stable Isotopes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780632031542 20160527
Stable isotopes are used extensively in all areas of ecology: in studying metabolic processes, to monitor nitrogen turnover in soil, to look at pollution in rainwater, to trace elements through ecosystems, etc. This book, written by two of the leading researchers in the field, explains the background to stable isotope methodology and discuss the use of the methods in varying ecological situations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780632031542 20160527
Earth Sciences Library (Branner), Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
xv, 525 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
1 online resource : illustrations
  • Front Cover; Bayesian Data Analysis in Ecology Using Linear Models with R, BUGS, and Stan; Copyright; Contents; Digital Assets; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1
  • Why do we Need Statistical Models and What is this Book About?; 1.1 WHY WE NEED STATISTICAL MODELS; 1.2 WHAT THIS BOOK IS ABOUT; FURTHER READING; Chapter 2
  • Prerequisites and Vocabulary; 2.1 SOFTWARE; 2.2 IMPORTANT STATISTICAL TERMS AND HOW TO HANDLE THEM IN R; FURTHER READING; Chapter 3
  • The Bayesian and the Frequentist Ways of Analyzing Data; 3.1 SHORT HISTORICAL OVERVIEW; 3.2 THE BAYESIAN WAY; 3.3 THE FREQUENTIST WAY
  • 3.4 COMPARISON OF THE BAYESIAN AND THE FREQUENTIST WAYSFURTHER READING; Chapter 4
  • Normal Linear Models; 4.1 LINEAR REGRESSION; 4.2 REGRESSION VARIANTS: ANOVA, ANCOVA, AND MULTIPLE REGRESSION; FURTHER READING; Chapter 5
  • Likelihood; 5.1 THEORY; 5.2 THE MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD METHOD; 5.3 THE LOG POINTWISE PREDICTIVE DENSITY; FURTHER READING; Chapter 6
  • Assessing Model Assumptions: Residual Analysis; 6.1 MODEL ASSUMPTIONS; 6.2 INDEPENDENT AND IDENTICALLY DISTRIBUTED; 6.3 THE QQ PLOT; 6.4 TEMPORAL AUTOCORRELATION; 6.5 SPATIAL AUTOCORRELATION; 6.6 HETEROSCEDASTICITY; FURTHER READING
  • Chapter 7
  • Linear Mixed Effects Models7.1 BACKGROUND; 7.2 FITTING A LINEAR MIXED MODEL IN R; 7.3 RESTRICTED MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION; 7.4 ASSESSING MODEL ASSUMPTIONS; 7.5 DRAWING CONCLUSIONS; 7.6 FREQUENTIST RESULTS; 7.7 RANDOM INTERCEPT AND RANDOM SLOPE; 7.8 NESTED AND CROSSED RANDOM EFFECTS; 7.9 MODEL SELECTION IN MIXED MODELS; FURTHER READING; Chapter 8
  • Generalized Linear Models; 8.1 BACKGROUND; 8.2 BINOMIAL MODEL; 8.3 FITTING A BINARY LOGISTIC REGRESSION IN R; 8.4 POISSON MODEL; FURTHER READING; Chapter 9
  • Generalized Linear Mixed Models; 9.1 BINOMIAL MIXED MODEL
  • 9.2 POISSON MIXED MODELFURTHER READING; Chapter 10
  • Posterior Predictive Model Checking and Proportion of Explained Variance; 10.1 POSTERIOR PREDICTIVE MODEL CHECKING; 10.2 MEASURES OF EXPLAINED VARIANCE; FURTHER READING; Chapter 11
  • Model Selection and Multimodel Inference; 11.1 WHEN AND WHY WE SELECT MODELS AND WHY THIS IS DIFFICULT; 11.2 METHODS FOR MODEL SELECTION AND MODEL COMPARISONS; 11.3 MULTIMODEL INFERENCE; 11.4 WHICH METHOD TO CHOOSE AND WHICH STRATEGY TO FOLLOW; FURTHER READING; Chapter 12
  • Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation; 12.1 BACKGROUND; 12.2 MCMC USING BUGS
  • 12.3 MCMC USING STAN12.4 SIM, BUGS, AND STAN; FURTHER READING; Chapter 13
  • Modeling Spatial Data Using GLMM; 13.1 BACKGROUND; 13.2 MODELING ASSUMPTIONS; 13.3 EXPLICIT MODELING OF SPATIAL AUTOCORRELATION; FURTHER READING; Chapter 14
  • Advanced Ecological Models; 14.1 HIERARCHICAL MULTINOMIAL MODEL TO ANALYZE HABITAT SELECTION USING BUGS; 14.2 ZERO-INFLATED POISSON MIXED MODEL FOR ANALYZING BREEDING SUCCESS USING STAN; 14.3 OCCUPANCY MODEL TO MEASURE SPECIES DISTRIBUTION USING STAN; 14.4 TERRITORY OCCUPANCY MODEL TO ESTIMATE SURVIVAL USING BUGS
Bayesian Data Analysis in Ecology Using Linear Models with R, BUGS, and STAN examines the Bayesian and frequentist methods of conducting data analyses. The book provides the theoretical background in an easy-to-understand approach, encouraging readers to examine the processes that generated their data. Including discussions of model selection, model checking, and multi-model inference, the book also uses effect plots that allow a natural interpretation of data. Bayesian Data Analysis in Ecology Using Linear Models with R, BUGS, and STAN introduces Bayesian software, using R for the simple modes, and flexible Bayesian software (BUGS and Stan) for the more complicated ones. Guiding the ready from easy toward more complex (real) data analyses ina step-by-step manner, the book presents problems and solutions-including all R codes-that are most often applicable to other data and questions, making it an invaluable resource for analyzing a variety of data types.
Book
Pages: 5 : digital, PDF file.
Book
Pages: 230 : digital, PDF file.
Book
Pages: 261 : digital, PDF file.
Book
56 p. ; cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 308 p. : ill.
Book
ii, 96 p. : ill., 1 map ; 27 cm.
Green Library
Book
p. 222-240 p. : ill., map.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (Pages: 92 ) : digital, PDF file.

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