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Book
259, 5 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
11 volumes ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

3. Abstracts of theses [1936 - 1937]

Journal/Periodical
2 volumes ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Database topics
African Studies; Education; General and Reference Works
Database of citations and abstracts of dissertations from African universities.
Book
volumes : illustrations (black and white) ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
volumes ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
39 pages ; 28 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
volumes ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

9. Historia y sociedad [1994 - ]

Book
xxi, 196 p. ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxx, 195 pages : illustration ; 23 cm
  • Permissions Praise for Challenges in Writing Your Dissertation Foreword: By Professor Irma M. Barron Acknowledgments Illustration: The Ideal Dissertation Introduction: How I Became an Academic Nag *Why This Book *What's Here *My Methods and Techniques *Why Me? oI Never Left School oFrom Professor to Typist oTo Coach and Editor oDisclosure: My Writing (Mostly Nonacademic) *A Word About the Spiritual *"Academic Nag" PART ONE: SNEAKING UP ON THE DISSERTATION Chapter 1. The Decision: Your Dream, Your Life *How Is the Degree Part of Your Life's Dream? *What Will the Degree Do for You? *Visualize Your Dream *Affirmations for Strengthening Your Life Dream *As They Say, Meditate, Don't Medicate 2. BIG Changes *It's Not Just College Anymore *How Ready Are You to Change Your Lifestyle? oNo Structure oNo Leisure *It's Your Time *Declare and Feel Your Readiness PART TWO: REALLY DOING IT 3. Priorities and Promises to Yourself *Your Inner Mentor: Listening for Answers *Rethink Your Priorities *Find the Holes in Your Schedule *Keep Your Promises to Yourself *Your Later List *Affirm Your Right Time and Timing 4. Enroll Your Higher Self *Hello, Light Being! *Trust the Process *Three Puzzling and Powerful Reinforcing Laws oThe Law of Least Effort oThe Law of Intention and Desire oThe Law of Detachment *Recognize and Accept Your Power *A Few Higher Self Affirmations 5. Starting the Work: Positive Patient Persevering *Listen for the Topic That's Right for You oTopic Considerations oRight Topic Considerations *You're the Scholar in Shining Armor *Muster Your Courage for the Proposal oWhat's Your Problem? oCourageous Affirmations *You Don't Have to Walk a Straight (Out)Line *Tricks to Tease and Ease Yourself into It *Writing Doesn't Have to Be Torture: Proper Style and Semipleasant Process *Settle In: You Deserve It 6. Sticking With It: Temptations and Tonics *Dissertation Interruptus *Death by Rationale *Resisting the Extension Siren *Getting Sick ... of It All *Fear of Finishing *Discipline Is a Choice *Continuing the Work: Your Wayward Outline *If You're Concerned About Your Brain *Reasonable Breaks and Balance oWorking Questions oBalanced Breaks *Affirmations for Sticking With It PART THREE: YOUR NEAR, DEAR, AND DESPAIRING SIGNIFICANT OTHERS 7. Orient the Important Others in Your Life *Stranger in a Strange Graduate School Culture *Family and Friends: Starting Off Wrong *Starting Off Right oSelfish? oSaying No *Sacrifices and Rewards: Short-Term, Mid-Term, Interminable-Term oEducate Them oBribe Them 8. Family: Choruses of Complaints, Songs of Support *Partners: "I Didn't Bargain for This" or "I Never See You Anymore" *Kids: "We Never See You Anymore" *Involve Them: Share What You're Doing oInvolving Partners oInvolving Kids *Special Dates With Partners and Kids oDates With Partners oDates With Kids *Other Relatives: "We Never See You Anymore" oEducate and Bribe, Again oSabotage, Unconscious or Not *Holiday Strategies *Toxic Volleys and Tough Questions oYour Neutralizing Responses oHard Questions and Your Brilliant Answers *Troubled Waters: Fights, Separation, Divorce *See Them Whole oSend Love Ahead oSee Them Supportive 9. Friends: Are They for You or Against You? *"Come On-It's Only a Quick Lunch": Just Say Not Now *Community Involvement and Volunteer Activities: Just Say Later *Handle Jealousies and Putdowns *Let Go of the Crazymakers *Those Questions Again: "Aren't You Done Yet?" *Assure Them You Still Love Them *Know and Believe They Are For and With You 10. Make Peace and Time With Your Employer and Work Colleagues *Express Your Gratitude and Explain, Explain *Point Out How Your Degree Benefits the Company *Negotiate What Works for Both of You *Superior Jealousies oRecognize Toxicity oToxicity Antidotes *Work Colleagues' Envy *Affirm, Visualize, and Project Employment Peace PART FOUR: GOOD UNIVERSITY COPS AND BAD 11. Your Dissertation Committee: The Best/Worst Friends You'll Ever Have \ *Are Professors Really Human? *Excruciating or Exceptional? *Who Can You Work With and How Do You Know? oGather Plenty of Information oAsk Questions About the Chair *Listen Inside: Gut and Guidance oAsk Questions of Yourself oHow Do You Feel? *Design and See Your Perfect Committee 12. Dancing With the Committee *Whose Topic? *Buddying Up or Keeping Too Distant oChums oStrangers oThe Ideal Balance *Playing Humble Student and Keeping Your Self-Respect oSwallow Your Pride oRaise Your Head *When You're Older Than Your Professors *The Infinite Loop of Revisions *Appealing to Higher Authorities oOn the Ground oIn Your Head *Your Higher Self and Theirs oPsychologically Speaking oSpiritually Speaking 13. University Support: You've Got More Friends Than You Think *Fellow Students as Mentors *What Can You Learn From Learning Centers? *You Can Speak to the Geeks in the Computer Lab *Add to Your Team: Statisticians and Researchers oStatisticians oResearchers *Librarians Love You, Secretaries Stand By You oLibrarians oSecretaries *Consider Coaches and Editors oCoaches oEditors *Old Course Professors Don't Have to Fade Away *Picture the Perfect University Friends You Need PART FIVE: GRADUATION: IT'S ONLY A WALK AWAY 14. Am I Really Almost Done? *Rehearse Your Perfect Defense *Yet Another Faculty Review *Master the Red Tape *How to Enjoy Your Own Graduation *Avoid Post-Parting Depression (PPD) 15.Waking to Your Dream *The Most Dangerous Time ... *Envision Your Future, Take the Steps *Peek at Your Long-Neglected Later List *Reenter Your Family's Atmosphere *Plan Your Payoffs oPositions oPublications *Celebrate Your Professional and Personal Growth With Gratitude Conclusion: Why I'm Still an Academic Nag References Selected Resources A Short Glossary of Important Acronyms About the Author.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781475815047 20160619
In Challenges in Writing Your Dissertation: Coping With the Emotional, Interpersonal, and Spiritual Struggles, Noelle Sterne, Ph.D., demystifies the dissertation-writing process. She offers practical strategies so this often overwhelming process becomes less intimidating to doctoral candidates. Sterne addresses common fears and hurdles students face when writing and defending their dissertations and provides inspiration and encouragement during this long stressful time. This important resource is a must-read for doctoral candidates.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781475815047 20160619
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
1 online resource (256 pages)
Umberto Eco's wise and witty guide to researching and writing a thesis, published in English for the first time. By the time Umberto Eco published his best-selling novel The Name of the Rose, he was one of Italy's most celebrated intellectuals, a distinguished academic and the author of influential works on semiotics. Some years before that, in 1977, Eco published a little book for his students, How to Write a Thesis, in which he offered useful advice on all the steps involved in researching and writing a thesis-from choosing a topic to organizing a work schedule to writing the final draft. Now in its twenty-third edition in Italy and translated into seventeen languages, How to Write a Thesis has become a classic. Remarkably, this is its first, long overdue publication in English. Eco's approach is anything but dry and academic. He not only offers practical advice but also considers larger questions about the value of the thesis-writing exercise. How to Write a Thesis is unlike any other writing manual. It reads like a novel. It is opinionated. It is frequently irreverent, sometimes polemical, and often hilarious. Eco advises students how to avoid "thesis neurosis" and he answers the important question "Must You Read Books?" He reminds students "You are not Proust" and "Write everything that comes into your head, but only in the first draft." Of course, there was no Internet in 1977, but Eco's index card research system offers important lessons about critical thinking and information curating for students of today who may be burdened by Big Data. How to Write a Thesis belongs on the bookshelves of students, teachers, writers, and Eco fans everywhere. Already a classic, it would fit nicely between two other classics: Strunk and White and The Name of the Rose. Contents The Definition and Purpose of a Thesis * Choosing the Topic * Conducting Research * The Work Plan and the Index Cards * Writing the Thesis * The Final Draft.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262527132 20180604
Book
xxvi, 229 pages ; 21 cm
Umberto Eco's wise and witty guide to researching and writing a thesis, published in English for the first time. By the time Umberto Eco published his best-selling novel The Name of the Rose, he was one of Italy's most celebrated intellectuals, a distinguished academic and the author of influential works on semiotics. Some years before that, in 1977, Eco published a little book for his students, How to Write a Thesis, in which he offered useful advice on all the steps involved in researching and writing a thesis-from choosing a topic to organizing a work schedule to writing the final draft. Now in its twenty-third edition in Italy and translated into seventeen languages, How to Write a Thesis has become a classic. Remarkably, this is its first, long overdue publication in English. Eco's approach is anything but dry and academic. He not only offers practical advice but also considers larger questions about the value of the thesis-writing exercise. How to Write a Thesis is unlike any other writing manual. It reads like a novel. It is opinionated. It is frequently irreverent, sometimes polemical, and often hilarious. Eco advises students how to avoid "thesis neurosis" and he answers the important question "Must You Read Books?" He reminds students "You are not Proust" and "Write everything that comes into your head, but only in the first draft." Of course, there was no Internet in 1977, but Eco's index card research system offers important lessons about critical thinking and information curating for students of today who may be burdened by Big Data. How to Write a Thesis belongs on the bookshelves of students, teachers, writers, and Eco fans everywhere. Already a classic, it would fit nicely between two other classics: Strunk and White and The Name of the Rose. Contents The Definition and Purpose of a Thesis * Choosing the Topic * Conducting Research * The Work Plan and the Index Cards * Writing the Thesis * The Final Draft.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262527132 20180521
Business Library
Book
1 online resource (67 pages) : illustrations, tables.
Book
1 online resource (180 pages) : illustrations, tables.
Book
3, 11, 2, 170 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
3, 156 p. ; 20 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
1 online resource (434 pages)
An excellent resource for graduate students beginning the dissertation phase, for faculty who serve on dissertation committees or as dissertation advisors, and for faculty who may teach dissertation process courses. The text is also a valuable resource for academic departments who may want or need to develop dissertation standards from the ground up or to revamp their existing standards and expectations. The strength of Lovitts' book lies in the practical usefulness of the text...and its functionality for different academic disciplines. "?The Review of Higher EducationThis book and the groundbreaking study on which it is based is about making explicit to doctoral students the tacit rules for the assessment of the final of all final educational products the dissertation. The purpose of defining performance expectations is to make them more transparent to graduate students while they are in the researching and writing phases, and thus to help them achieve to higher levels of accomplishment.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781579221805 20180611
Book
xii, 173 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Supervision and Doctoral Writing 2.Writing and Identity 3. Writing the Self into the Thesis 4.Writing a Literature Review or Mapping the Field of Knowledge Production 5. Writing an Abstract: The Argument Writ Small 6. Constructing the Dissertation: The Argument Writ Large 7. The Grammar of Authority 8. Becoming "Writerly" 9. Towards Institutional Writing Cultures.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415346849 20160604
This essential guide offers a new approach to doctoral writing, written specifically for doctoral supervisors. Rejecting the DIY websites and manuals that promote a privatised skills-based approach to writing research, Kamler and Thomson offer a new framework for scholarly work to help doctorate students produce clear and well-argued dissertations. Drawing on a wide range of research and hands-on experience, the authors argue that making an original contribution to scholarly knowledge requires doctoral candidates to do both text and identity work. Their discussion of the complexities of forming a scholarly identity is illustrated by the stories and writing of real doctoral students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415346849 20160604
Education Library (Cubberley)

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