%{search_type} search results

41 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
lxx, 733 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxvii, 213 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
319 p. ; 22 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
lii, 801 p. ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
117 p. 26 cm.
Hoover Library
Book
15, [1]p. ; 8⁰.
find.galegroup.com Eighteenth Century Collections Online
Book
clxxxii, 2279 p. : port. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 235 pages ; 22 cm.
  • The rise of Fianna Fáil and the failure of the Constitution of the Irish Free State
  • Advancing the republican project
  • The abdication of King Edward VIII
  • Constitutional drafting and contemporary debates
  • The reception of the Irish Constitution : May-July 1937
  • Aftermath.
The first of two volumes, this book examines constitutionalism in Ireland in the 1930s. Donal K. Coffey places the document and its drafters in the context of a turbulent decade for the United Kingdom, the Commonwealth, and Europe. He considers a series of key issues leading up to its drafting, including the failure of the 1922 Constitution, the rise of nationalism in the 1920s and 1930s, and the abdication of Edward VIII. He sketches the drafting process, examines the roles of individual drafters and their intellectual influences, and considers the Constitution's public reception, both domestically and internationally. This book illuminates a critical moment in Irish history and the confluence of national, Commonwealth, and international influences that gave rise to it, for scholars of Irish history as well as of legal, constitutional, and Commonwealth history more broadly.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319762364 20180813
Law Library (Crown)
Book
civ, 991 pages ; 24 cm
  • Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: Judicial Chapter 3: The State and its Authority Chapter 4: The President Chapter 5: The Legislature Chapter 6: The Executive Chapter 7: The Courts and Judiciary Chapter 8: Separation of Powers Chapter 9: The European Union Chapter 10: International Relations Chapter 11: Public Finance Chapter 12: Fundamental/Human Rights Chapter 13: Legality or the Rule of Law Chapter 14: Life and Human Dignity Chapter 15: Personal Liberty Chapter 16: Equality and Non-Discrimination Chapter 17: Criminal Procedure Chapter 18: Civil and Other Procedures Chapter 19: Speech and Expression Chapter 20: Association and Assembly Chapter 21: Political Participation Chapter 22: Religion Chapter 23: Privacy and Personality Chapter 24: The Family, Children and the Unborn Chapter 25: Private Property Chapter 26: Economic Activities Chapter 27: Education, Health and Welfare Chapter 28: Non-Government Conduct Chapter 29: State Security, Emergencies and War Chapter 30: Procedure and Remedies Annex: Constitution of Ireland.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781847667380 20160618
Since the previous edition of this book, changes have taken place with Articles of the Constitution; challenges to articles; referenda; new legislation and cases judicially considered. This new edition is almost completely re-written as a result of the tumultuous changes in Irish Constitutional Law. Dr Forde, an accomplished constitutional law author and practitioner, offers the reader everything they need to know on this complex subject. EURO PRICE: 130.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781847667380 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 759 p. ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxvii, 403 p. ; 23 cm.
Suitable for law students in universities, those taking Law Society examinations and Kings Inn examinations, this is an introduction to the principles of Irish constitutional law and rights. The book contains a summary of each of the 150 or so leading constitutional cases decided by Irish courts, discussing the basis of the state's political and governmental framework and looks at fundamental rights such as equality, personal liberty, freedom of association, freedom of assembly, freedom of expression, family rights and property rights. Brian Doolan is the author of "Principles of Irish Law", "A Casebook on Irish Company Law", "A Casebook in Business Law" and "A Casebook in Contract Law".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780717120475 20160527
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxvi, 308 p. ; 22 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource ([iii], 34 p.)
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxi, 400 p. 25 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xxi, 400 p. 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 262 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Part I. Constitutions, Democracy, Identity: 1. Introduction-- 2. Three paradigms of democratic constitutions-- 3. The incrementalist approach to constitution-making-- Part II. Varieties of Constitutional Incrementalism: 4. Informal consociationalism in Israel-- 5. Constructive ambiguity in India-- 6. Symbolic ambivalence in Ireland-- Part III. For and Against Constitutional Incrementalism: 7. Normative arguments for constitutional incrementalism-- 8. Potential dangers-- 9. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107005150 20160605
How can societies still grappling over the common values and shared vision of their state draft a democratic constitution? This is the central puzzle of Making Constitutions in Deeply Divided Societies. While most theories discuss constitution-making in the context of a moment of revolutionary change, Hanna Lerner argues that an incrementalist approach to constitution-making can enable societies riven by deep internal disagreements to either enact a written constitution or function with an unwritten one. She illustrates the process of constitution-writing in three deeply divided societies - Israel, India and Ireland - and explores the various incrementalist strategies deployed by their drafters. These include the avoidance of clear decisions, the use of ambivalent legal language and the inclusion of contrasting provisions in the constitution. Such techniques allow the deferral of controversial choices regarding the foundational aspects of the polity to future political institutions, thus enabling the constitution to reflect a divided identity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107005150 20160605
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (272 p.) : digital, PDF file(s).
  • Part I. Constitutions, Democracy, Identity: 1. Introduction-- 2. Three paradigms of democratic constitutions-- 3. The incrementalist approach to constitution-making-- Part II. Varieties of Constitutional Incrementalism: 4. Informal consociationalism in Israel-- 5. Constructive ambiguity in India-- 6. Symbolic ambivalence in Ireland-- Part III. For and Against Constitutional Incrementalism: 7. Normative arguments for constitutional incrementalism-- 8. Potential dangers-- 9. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107005150 20160605
How can societies still grappling over the common values and shared vision of their state draft a democratic constitution? This is the central puzzle of Making Constitutions in Deeply Divided Societies. While most theories discuss constitution-making in the context of a moment of revolutionary change, Hanna Lerner argues that an incrementalist approach to constitution-making can enable societies riven by deep internal disagreements to either enact a written constitution or function with an unwritten one. She illustrates the process of constitution-writing in three deeply divided societies - Israel, India and Ireland - and explores the various incrementalist strategies deployed by their drafters. These include the avoidance of clear decisions, the use of ambivalent legal language and the inclusion of contrasting provisions in the constitution. Such techniques allow the deferral of controversial choices regarding the foundational aspects of the polity to future political institutions, thus enabling the constitution to reflect a divided identity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107005150 20160605
Book
ix, 262 p.
"How can societies still grappling over the common values and shared vision of their state draft a democratic constitution? This is the central puzzle of Making Constitutions in Deeply Divided Societies. While most theories discuss constitution-making in the context of a moment of revolutionary change, Hanna Lerner argues that an incrementalist approach to constitution-making can enable societies riven by deep internal disagreements to either enact a written constitution or function with an unwritten one. She illustrates the process of constitution-writing in three deeply divided societies - Israel, India and Ireland - and explores the various incrementalist strategies deployed by their drafters. These include the avoidance of clear decisions, the use of ambivalent legal language and the inclusion of contrasting provisions in the constitution. Such techniques allow the deferral of controversial choices regarding the foundational aspects of the polity to future political institutions, thus enabling the constitution to reflect a divided identity"-- Provided by publisher.
Book
vi, 127 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction - represent(n)ation in the constitutional text-- origi(n)ation - the problem of the subject in the constitutional text-- of manifestos and mamafesta's - gender in(g) the new Ireland-- quare nation - lesbion and gay citizenship in postcolonial law and literature-- d(en)ying narratives - law, bioethics and identity-- terri(s)tory - nation and territory in Irish constitutional discourse-- renarr(n)ation - the constitution and the limits of Irish identity.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754621386 20160527
This volume attempts to analyze the contradictory notions of citizenship posited by postcolonial Irish constitutional discourse. In the postcolonial period of Ireland's history, Irish citizenship has been marked by a conflict between foundational nationalist notions of the nation and a more liberal narrative of individual autonomy. This splintering into competing class, economic and other identity positions is at odds with the search for an Ireland, uncomplicated, cohesive and immutable. Patrick Hanafin does not set out to find a single definition as to what it means to be an Irish citizen, but rather to try and understand the different definitions already available. He analyzes "Irishness" within the context of culture and the law in Ireland and considers how representative the constitution, drawn up by individuals, is when reflecting Ireland as a whole.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754621386 20160527
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

Articles+

Journal articles, e-books, & other e-resources
Articles+ results include