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Book
213 pages ; 23 cm.
"Opinions about America have taken a decisive turn in the early part of the 21st century. Some 70% of Americans believe that the country is moving in the wrong direction, and half the country thinks that its best days are behind it. Most believe that their children will be less prosperous and have fewer opportunities than previous generations. Evident to all is that the political system is broken and social fabric is fraying, particularly as a growing gap between wealthy haves and left-behind have-nots increases, a hostile divide widens between faithful and secular, and deep disagreement persists over America's role in the world. Wealthy Americans continue to build gated enclaves in and around select cities where they congregate, while growing numbers of Christians compare our times to those of the late Roman empire, and ponder a fundamental withdrawal from wider American society into updated forms of Benedictine monastic communities. The signs of the times suggest that much is wrong with America. This collection of thematic essays by Notre Dame political theorist and public intellectual Patrick Deneen addresses the questions, is there something worth conserving in America, and if so, is America capable of conservation? Can a nation founded in a revolutionary moment that led to the founding of the first liberal nation be thought capable of sustaining and passing on virtues and practices that ennoble? Or is America inherently a nation that idolizes the new over the old, license over ordered liberty, and hedonism over self-rule? Can America conserve what is worth keeping for it to remain--or even become--a Republic?"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
x, 532 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: What happened to conservatism? : why reforming the country requires transforming the Right
  • The ambiguous hero : Ronald Reagan as conservatism's model and problem
  • In the shadow of Goldwater : it didn't start with the Tea Party
  • From radicalism to governing : how Nixon failed conservatives, Reagan thrilled them--and then left them hanging
  • The end of the Reagan majority : George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and the politics of deadlock
  • The Gingrich revolution and conservatism's second chance : M2E2 and the Right's Achilles' heel
  • Put on a compassionate face : the promise and limits of compassionate conservatism
  • Double-edged "strategery" : George W. Bush, Karl Rove, and the search for a fourth way
  • "I can hear you" : how W. united the country, then divided it more than ever
  • The new, new, old Right : the Tea Party explosion that was waiting to happen
  • Dreams of celestial choirs : Barack Obama hopes, but the GOP doesn't change
  • The logic of obstruction : why conservative opposition to Obama was inevitable
  • The Tea Party overreaches and Republicans wage class war : the making and unmaking of Mitt Romney
  • Saying yes and no to Obama : the two electorates and the cycles of dysfunction
  • The fever that wouldn't break : when winning two elections isn't enough
  • Reforming conservatism or trumping it : a new conservatism, a new pizza box, or something completely different?
  • Up from Goldwaterism : the conservative challenge and America's future.
Why the Right Went Wrong offers a historical view of the right since the 1960s. Its core contention is that American conservatism and the Republican Party took a wrong turn when they adopted Barry Goldwater's worldview during and after the 1964 campaign. The radicalism of today's conservatism is not the product of the Tea Party, Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne writes. The Tea Partiers are the true heirs to Goldwater ideology. The purity movement did more than drive moderates out of the Republican Party--it beat back alternative definitions of conservatism. --Publisher.
Green Library
Book
xix, 390 p. : facsim. ; 25 cm.
Irving Kristol, the "godfather" of neoconservatism and one of our most important public intellectuals, played an extraordinarily influential role in the development of American intellectual and political culture over the past half century. These essays, many hard to find and reprinted here for the first time since their initial appearance, are a penetrating survey of the intellectual development of one of the progenitors of neoconservatism. Kristol wrote over the years on a remarkably broad range of topics--from W. H. Auden to Ronald Reagan, from the neoconservative movement's roots in the 1940s at City College to American foreign policy, from religion to capitalism. Kristol's writings provide us with a unique guide to the development of neoconservatism as one of the leading strains of thought--one of the leading "persuasions"--in recent American political and intellectual history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780465023332 20160605
Green Library
Book
xii, 305 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Preface Introduction The Neoconservative Persuasion PART I: Neoconservatism and American Politics Chapter 1 The Path to Power Chapter 2 A New Governing Philosophy PART II: Leo Strauss and the Crisis of Modernity Chapter 3 The Straussian Moment Chapter 4 The Road to Nihilism PART III: Leo Strauss and the Return to Plato Chapter 5 The Long Trek Back to Plato Chapter 6 Classical Natural Right PART IV: Neoconservatism's New World Order Chapter 7 The World According to the Neocons Chapter 8 Benevolent Hegemony PART V: Soft Despotism Chapter 9 The Fascist Temptation Chapter 10 National-Greatness Conservatism Conclusion Neoconservatism and the American Grain.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781594518317 20160604
An obituary - so soon! Surely the reports of neoconservatism's death are greatly exaggerated. C. Bradley Thompson has written (with Yaron Brook) the most comprehensive and original analysis of neoconservatism yet published and in the process has dealt it a mortal blow. Neoconservatism reveals publicly for the first time what the neocons call their "philosophy of governance" - their plan for governing America. This book explicates the deepest philosophic principles of neoconservatism, elucidates the intellectual relationship between the political philosopher Leo Strauss and neoconservative political actors, and provides a trenchant critique of neoconservatism from the perspective of America's founding principles. The theme of this timely book will shake up the intellectual salons of both the Left and Right: Neoconservatism as a species of anti-Americanism. What makes this book so compelling is that Thompson actually lived for many years in the Straussian/neoconservative intellectual world. Neoconservatism therefore fits into the 'breaking ranks' tradition of scholarly criticism and breaks the mold when it comes to informed, incisive, nonpartisan critique of neoconservative thought and action.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781594518317 20160604
Green Library
Book
366 p. ; 25 cm.
Neoconservatism has undergone a transformation that has made a clear identity almost impossible to capture. The Republican foreign policy operatives of the George W. Bush era seem far removed from the early liberal intellectuals who focused on domestic issues. Justin Vaisse offers the first comprehensive history of neoconservatism, exploring the connections between a changing and multifaceted school of thought, a loose network of thinkers and activists, and American political life in turbulent times. In an insightful portrait of the neoconservatives and their impact on public life, Vaisse frames the movement in three distinct ages: the New York intellectuals who reacted against the 1960s leftists; the 'Scoop Jackson Democrats, ' who tried to preserve a mix of hawkish anticommunism abroad and social progress at home but failed to recapture the soul of the Democratic Party; and, the 'Neocons' of the 1990s and 2000s, who are no longer either liberals or Democrats. He covers neglected figures of this history such as Pat Moynihan, Eugene Rostow, Lane Kirkland, and Bayard Rustin, and offers new historical insight into two largely overlooked organizations, the Coalition for a Democratic Majority and the Committee on the Present Danger. He illuminates core developments, including the split of liberalism in the 1960s, and the shifting relationship between partisan affiliation and foreign policy positions. Vaisse gives neoconservatism its due as a complex movement and predicts it will remain an influential force in the American political landscape.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674060708 20160604
Green Library
Book
x, 296 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • List of Illustrations vii Acknowledgments ix introduction 1 Chapter 0ne: Robert Taft: The Gray Men of Modern Conservatism and the Rights of Property 9 Chapter Two: William Buckley: Building the Conservative Political Culture 39 Chapter Three: Barry Goldwater: Cowboy Conservatism, Race Politics, and the Other Sixties 77 Chapter Four: Phyllis Schlafly: Domestic Conservatism and Social Order 119 Chapter Five: Ronald Reagan: The Conservative Hero 159 Chapter Six: George W. Bush: The Conservative Calling and the Great Crack-up 209 Conclusion 257 Notes 263 Index 285.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691129150 20160604
"The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism" tells the gripping story of perhaps the most significant political force of our time through the lives and careers of six leading figures at the heart of the movement. David Farber traces the history of modern conservatism from its revolt against New Deal liberalism, to its breathtaking resurgence under Ronald Reagan, to its spectacular defeat with the election of Barack Obama. Farber paints vivid portraits of Robert Taft, William F. Buckley Jr., Barry Goldwater, Phyllis Schlafly, Ronald Reagan, and George W. Bush. He shows how these outspoken, charismatic, and frequently controversial conservative leaders were united by a shared insistence on the primacy of social order, national security, and economic liberty. Farber demonstrates how they built a versatile movement capable of gaining and holding power, from Taft's opposition to the New Deal to Buckley's founding of the National Review as the intellectual standard-bearer of modern conservatism; from Goldwater's crusade against leftist politics and his failed 1964 bid for the presidency to Schlafly's rejection of feminism in favor of traditional gender roles and family values; and, from Reagan's city upon a hill to conservatism's downfall with Bush's ambitious presidency. "The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism" provides rare insight into how conservatives captured the American political imagination by claiming moral superiority, downplaying economic inequality, relishing bellicosity, and embracing nationalism. This concise and accessible history reveals how these conservative leaders discovered a winning formula that enabled them to forge a powerful and formidable political majority.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691129150 20160604
Green Library
Book
123 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
xvii, 231 p. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxiii, 247 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Neoconservatism in theory
  • Neoconservatism in practice
  • Relativism and the Iraq war
  • Neoconservatism for America.
"Neo Conservatism: Why We Need It" is a defense of the most controversial political philosophy of our era. Douglas Murray takes a fresh look at the movement that replaced Great-Society liberalism, helped Ronald Reagan bring down the Wall, and provided the intellectual rationale for the Bush administration's War on Terror. While others are blaming it for foreign policy failures and, more extremely, attacking it as a Jewish cabal, Murray argues that the West needs Neo-conservatism more than ever. In addition to explaining what Neo conservatism is and where it came from, he argues that this American-born response to the failed policies of the 1960s is the best approach to foreign affairs not only for the United States but also for Britain and the West as well.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781594031472 20160528
Green Library

10. The neocon reader [2004]

Book
328 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxii, 166 p. ; 23 cm.
Hoover Library
Book
xxii, 166 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
xi, 287 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
467 p.
Green Library
Book
viii, 295 p.; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xi, 500 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Preface 1. What is Neoconservatism? 2. The Struggle for the World: The Forerunners 3. The War of Ideology: Irving Kristol 4. The Culture of Appeasement: Norman Podhoretz 5. The Renewal of Whiggery: Michael Novak 6. Facing Up to Modernity: Peter Berger 7. Fractured Conservatisms: The Politics of Culture and Empire 8. Reconstructing Neoconservatism Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781566390194 20160528
For the past generation, neoconservatism has been the most powerful intellectual movement in American politics. Focusing on four of its most influential theorists Irving Kristol, Norman Podhoretz, Michael Novak, and Peter Berger Gary Dorrien presents a sweeping analysis of neoconservatism's history, ideology, and future prospects. He argues that it has the potential to become America's first genuine conservative intellectual tradition. Interviews with all the principal figures as well as with Michael Harrington and other opponents yield a rich and colorful portrayal of the figures and the publications that have shaped this ideological force. Neoconservatism grew out of the Old Left and retains the marks of its origins in the factional New York Intellectual debates of the 1930s.Dorrien traces the multiple strands that contributed to the new movement: former Trotskyites, trade unionists, and right-wing social democrats who opposed the countercultural movements of the 1960s, were disillusioned with the Great Society, felt alienated from the "fashionable liberal elite, " and were repulsed by the anti-American sentiments of the Left. They attacked the "new class, " an amorphous group of non-producing elites that at various times included liberal intellectuals, "parasitic" managers, and bureaucrats, social workers and psychologists, the major media, consultants, administrators, and lawyers. Throughout the fascinating intellectual biographies of Kristol, Podhoretz, Novak, and Berger, Dorrien describes the vast array of New York literati and political pundits who are or have been associated with these neoconservative leaders."Naming Commentary", "The New Republic", "The Public Interest", "Orbis", "The American Scholar", "The New Leader", "The American Spectator", and "Society", among others which have been established by or which regularly host the writings of prominent neoconservatives, Dorrien demonstrates the substantial influence of the movement. Dorrien characterizes neoconservatism by its militant anticommunist and capitalist economics, and its support of a minimal welfare state, the rule of traditional elites, and the return to traditional cultural values. He describes its different ideological currents, its feud with the traditional Right and the many camps from which its adherents converted.Tracking the movement's attainment of political power in the 1980s, he explains how the collapse of communism has fractured neoconservatism's foreign policy consensus, and analyzes the movement's subsequently heightened concern with cultural politics. While Dorrien does not aim to refute neoconservatism, he offers a respectful but strongly critical review of its development and examines the contradictions of its appeal. Gary Dorrien, an Episcopal priest, is Associate Professor of Religion and Dean of Stetson Chapel, and Chair of the Humanities Division at Kalamazoo College. The most recent of his three previous books is "Reconstructing the Common Good".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781566390194 20160528
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
213 p.
Green Library
Book
380 p. ; 26 cm.
Green Library
Book
159 p. ; 22 cm.
Hoover Library
Book
270 p. : ports ; 21 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)

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