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Book
xiii, 241 : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 25 cm
The Sutton Hoo ship-burial is one of the most significant finds ever made in Europe. It lies in a burial ground which contains all the elements of archaeological mystery: seventeen mounds, buried treasure, and sacrificed horses. In this very accessible book, Martin Carver explains what we know of this site, at which the leaders of the Dark Age kingdom of East Anglia signalled the pagan and maritime nature of their court. This is the story not only of this dramatic place, but also of its exploration over half a century, which amounts to a potted history of British archaeology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781783272044 20170907
Green Library
Book
1 volume (various pagings) : illustrations (some color), maps ; 31 cm
Green Library
Book
184 p. : ill., maps.
Book
184 p. : ill., maps.
Book
xiv, 176 p. : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.)
Book
xxxviii, 424 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 25 cm.
  • Part 1: Principles 1. The Stuff 2. Approaches 3. Field Research Procedure: A Framework Part 2: In the Field 4. Landscape Survey 5. Site Survey 6. Excavation 7. Projects Galore Part 3: Writing Up 8. Analysis 9. Assemblage 10. Space 11. Chronology 12. Synthesis 13. Publication Part 4: Design 14. Evaluation and Project Design 15. Our Profession and its Context. Glossary. Sources and Resources.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415489195 20160604
Drawing its numerous examples from Britain and beyond, Archaeological Investigation explores the procedures used in field archaeology travelling over the whole process from discovery to publication. Divided into four parts, it argues for a set of principles in part one, describes work in the field in part two and how to write up in part three. Part four describes the modern world in which all types of archaeologist operate, academic and professional. The central chapter 'Projects Galore' takes the reader on a whirlwind tour through different kinds of investigation including in caves, gravel quarries, towns, historic buildings and underwater. Archaeological Investigation intends to be a companion for a newcomer to professional archaeology - from a student introduction (part one), to first practical work (part two) to the first responsibilities for producing reports (part three) and, in part four, to the tasks of project design and heritage curation that provide the meat and drink of the fully fledged professional. The book also proposes new ways of doing things, tried out over the author's thirty years in the field and brought together here for the first time. This is no plodding manual but an inspiring, provocative, informative and entertaining book, urging that archaeological investigation is one of the most important things society does.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415489195 20160604
Green Library
Book
28 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
xvi, 240 p., [8] p. : ill. (some col.), maps.
Book
xvi, 240 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 25 cm.
  • PORTMAHOMACK A Pictish holy place and its landscape Martin Carver PART 1 Exploring Ch 1 -- This is Portmahomack Ch 2 -- Expedition Ch 3 -- Discovery PART 2 The Monastery and its legacy Ch 4 -- The monks and their church Ch 5 -- Carvers and thinkers Ch 6 -- Architects and artisans Ch 7 -- Caught in the Cross Fire Ch 8 -- Back to the surface PART 3 Context Ch 9 -- A ritual landscape, with portage Ch 10 -- A holy place in history End notes References List of archaeological features.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780748624423 20160528
A trail of chance finds on the outskirts of Portmahomack during the 19th and 20th centuries culminated in 1996 in the first exposure of a Pictish settlement in northern Scotland. The area soon became the subject of one of the largest research excavations ever to have taken place on the Scottish mainland. Discover the world of the Picts with this unique account of the discovery and excavation of an early monastery. Dating from the 6th to the 9th century AD, Portmahomack is one of the earliest Christian sites to be revealed in Britain and the first in the land of the Picts. The monastery was destroyed between 780 and 830 AD and was then lost to history before being unearthed by Martin Carver and his colleagues. In this highly illustrated book, Martin Carver describes the discovery of the site and the design and execution of the research programme, then traces the events that occurred from the mid-6th century to the 11th century when the parish church was founded on the former monastic site. The book ends with the subsequent history of the church of St Colman and a study of the Tarbat peninsula.The author's conclusions advance the theory that this was a prehistoric place before the monks arrived, and that they marked out the boundaries of their estate in the late 8th century with the lives of local saints carved on some of the greatest stone sculptures of the age.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780748624423 20160528
Green Library
Book
xl, 536 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 31 cm.
Sutton Hoo is one of the most famous archaeological sites in the world. In 1939 it was the scene of the discovery of a fabulous treasure buried in a ship 30 metres long. In 1983 a new project began with the aim of discovering the context of the great Sutton Hoo burial ship. Using revolutionary fieldwork procedures, this new campaign uncovered a hectare of the cemetery, surveyed the surrounding region and made direct comparisons with monumental practices in neighbouring kingdoms across the North Sea. It was found that the burials were highly diverse - cremations in bronze bowls, with a horse, in a bed, and in boats and ships - and that many had been ransacked. Among the new finds were a new ship-burial and the first complete horse-burial, with its harness, to be excavated in England. From the eighth to tenth century, this 'burial ground of kings' became an execution site, allowing the new Christian authorities to exercise power through the public disposal of dissidents. Two groups of unfurnished burials were discovered, one associated with the posts of a gallows or gibbet. "Sutton Hoo: A Seventh-Century Princely Burial Ground and its Context" offers a description of all the investigations undertaken since 1983. The early medieval artefacts, the early medieval landscape and the environmental and prehistoric sequences are studied by contributing experts. The book provides a complete scholarly companion to the archaeological research and interpretation of Sutton Hoo.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780714123226 20160528
Green Library
CLASSICS-389-01
Book
xii, 195 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 25 cm.
The Sutton Hoo site is one of the most important archaeological discoveries ever made in Britain, and arguably the world. Since the initial discovery of the ship burial in 1938, when newspaper reports with banner headlines kept the British public informed about the event, the mound burials and surrounding cemetery have yielded a wealth of archaeological evidence as well as glittering treasures. Martin Carver draws on the full range of research undertaken at the site, which was still being excavated in 1993, to present a story of the archaeological discovery. Beginning with the excavations, he goes on to tell the story of the site itself.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780714105918 20160527
Green Library
Book
ix, 123 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
160 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
  • Underneath English towns-- "vericomodium" - Roman ideal and reality-- dark earth and Dark Ages-- the early English towns-- the medieval fabric-- the urban motor-- private lives-- exploring cities - urban archaeologists in action-- a discourse on method.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780713436389 20160527
A survey and exploration of British urban archaeology - methods and techniques - and a summary of the current situation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780713436372 20160527
Urban archaeology can be difficult, dangerous and expensive, yet nowhere is archaeological evidence so concentrated and so vulnerable as underneath our towns and cities. The redevelopment in town centres has produced many of the discoveries of the last 20 years and much of the evidence here derives from recent urban excavations. From the Roman citizens who built to last, and who were responsible for so many of Europe's most durable remains, to the tenement builders of the Middle Ages, the author surveys a period of 1500 years of urban development. He explains the character of urban deposits and how their excavation throws light on the economic and domestic situations of ordinary citizens in Roman, Saxon and medieval times. The remains found, which vary from grave goods and scraps of leather and pottery, to rotting posts and surviving stone buildings, show how each version of town life was different. The work is aimed at both the layman and the student and the author offers controversial interpretations, especially of the Anglo-Saxon period.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780713436389 20160527
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiv, 588 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
In Europe, the cross went North and East as the centuries unrolled: from the Dingle Peninsula to Estonia, and from the Alps to Lapland, ranging in time from Roman Britain and Gaul in the third and fourth centuries to the conversion of peoples in the Baltic area a thousand years later. These episodes of conversion form the basic narrative here. History encourages the belief that the adoption of Christianity was somehow irresistible, but specialists show the underside of the process by turning the spotlight from the missionaries, who recorded their triumphs, to the converted, exploring their local situations and motives. What were the reactions of the northern peoples to the Christian message? Why would they wish to adopt it for the sake of its alliances? In what way did they adapt the Christian ethos and infrastructure to suit their own community? How did conversion affect the status of farmers, of smiths, of princes and of women? Was society wholly changed, or only in marginal matters of devotion and superstition? These are the issues discussed here by thirty-eight experts from across northern Europe; some answers come from astute re-readings of the texts alone, but most are owed to a combination of history, art history and archaeology working together. Martin Carver is Professor of Archaeology, University of York.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781903153116 20160528
Green Library
Book
xviii, 406 p., [32] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Part 1 East Anglia: before Sutton Hoo - structures of power and society, C.J. Scull-- late Roman and Anglo-Saxon settlement pattern, J. Newman-- Snape Anglo-Saxon cemetery, W. Filmer-Sankey-- a chronology for Suffolk place-names, M. Gelling-- Beowulf and the East Anglian royal pedigree, S. Newton-- kings, gesiths and thegns, H. Loyn. Part 2 England: burial practice, H. Geake-- 7th-century cremation burial in Asthall Barrow, Oxfordshire, T.M. Dickinson and G. Speake-- Anglo-Saxon symbolism, J.D. Richards-- Anglo-Saxon weapon burial rite, H. Harke-- royal power and royal symbols in "Beowulf", B. Raw-- Christianity in Southumbria, , Jane Stevenson-- Anglo-Saxon vocabulary, J. Roberts. Part 3 North-Western Europe: western and northern Britain, L. Alcock-- Pictland, S.M. Foster-- Frankish hegemony in England, I.N. Wood-- royal burial among the Franks, E. James-- the undiscovered grave of King Clovis, P. Perin-- social change around AD600, G. Hassall-- the Royal Cemetery at Borre, Vestfold (Norway), B. Myhre-- the Scandinavian character of Anglian England, J. Hines-- human sacrifice in the late pagan period, H. Ellis Davidson. Postscript: the Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Sutton Hoo, M.O.H. Carver.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780851153308 20160528
The Age of Sutton Hoo runs from the fifth to the eighth century AD - the age which separates the fall of the Roman Empire from the emergence of the nation-states that have endured down to the present day. This is a dark and difficult age, where hard evidence is rare, but glittering and richly varied: "myths, king-lists, placenames, sagas, settlements, runic inscriptions, palaces, belt-buckles, post-holes, middens and graves", says the editor, "are all grist to our mill". This volume celebrates the 50th anniversary of the discovery of that most famous burial of the early middle ages: the great treasure now in the British Museum, unearthed from the centre of a 90-foot-long ship buried in the sand beneath a mound on remote Suffolk heathland at Sutton Hoo. It also marks the end of the major campaign of excavations carried out there over the past decade, which involved the widest possible range of disciplines. The scholars whose work is gathered here, together with Martin Carver's concluding summary of the results of the latest excavations, represent the current state of knowledge about this extraordinary site; that it still has secrets to reveal is shown by the last-minute discovery of a striking burial of a young noble with his horse and grave goods.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780851153308 20160528
Green Library
Book
ix, 234 p. : ill., maps ; 31 cm.
  • Part 1 Prehistoric: the cult of relics in prehistoric Britain, Ann Woodward-- Lindow Man and other British bog bodies, Rick Turner-- labyrinths and mazes, Graham Webster-- post-erection attitudes - aftermath of a henge monument, Margaret Gray. Part 2 Dark Age: Death and the archaeologist, S.M. Hirst-- an Anglo-Saxon "cunning woman" from Bidford-on-Avon, Tania M. Dickinson-- where have all the dead Saxons gone?, Catherine Hills-- invisible people? material culture in "Dark Age" Yorkshire, Mark Whyman-- a sense of identity - distinctive Cornish stone artefacts in the Roman and post-Roman periods, Henrietta Quinnell-- a "vital" Yorkshire Viking hoard revisited, James Graham-Campbell-- the Saxon monastry at Whitby past, present, future, Mark Johnson. Part 3 Medieval: the role of the church in the development of Roman and early Anglo-Saxon London, Warwick Rodwell-- Lichfield - ecclesiastical origins, Jim Gould-- the cult of St David in the Middle Ages, Heather James-- monasteries as settlements - religion, society, and economy, AD 600-1050, Roberta Gilchrist and Richard Morris-- the medieval precinct of Glastonbury Abbey - some new evidence, Peter Leach and Peter Ellis-- perceiving patronage in the archaeological record - Bordesley Abbey, Grenville G. Astill and Susan M. Wright-- the development of the Carthusian order in Europe and Britain - a preliminary survey, Mick Aston-- the Premonstratensian order - a preliminary survey of its growth and distribution in medieval Europe, James Bond. Part 4 Modern: death and identity - strategies in body disposal and memorial at North Front cemetry, Gibraltar, Harold Mytum-- 18th and 19th century gravestones - having the last word, Patricia M. Ellison-- thundercloud and archaeologist - Indian burials and the study of the past in New Jersey, Ian Burrow-- archaeology, human evolution and politics in South Africa, Alan Turner-- a matter of ethics - archaeologists in Aboriginal Australia, R.J. Lampert. Appendices: Philip Rahtz - an appreciation, Lawrence Butler-- Philip Rahtz - principal publications 1951-1992, Lorna Watts-- tabula gratulatoria-- plates. introduction, "Dewisland" - a ritual landscape, the relics and shrine of St David, Heather James-- monasteries in the landscape, gender, kinship and social networks, the monastic household - population, land-holding and resources, slavery, chastity and the monastic community, monastic estates - consolidation, management and the "monastic market", Roberta Gilchrist and Richard Morris-- the medieval precinct of Glastonbury Abbey - some new evidence - introduction, the evaluation, interpretation and discussion, Peter Lelach and Peter Ellis-- part contents.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780851153377 20160528
Philip Rahtz's years of tenure at York were marked by substantialdevelopments both within the department and in the larger world offield archaeology. He operated with scholarship and practical energyat both ends of his profession, and now colleagues and associatesgather to honour him in a volume of essays devoted to the archaeologicalsearch for cult - a search now undertaken all the more confidentlyas scientific system is increasingly employed in this vital area ofenquiry. Contributors: Prehistoric: ANN WOODWARD, RICK TURNER, GRAHAMWEBSTER and MARGARET GRAY. Dark Ages: S.M. HIRST, TANIA M. DICKINSON, CATHERINE HILLS, MARK WHYMAN, HENRIETTA QUINNELL, JAMES GRAHAM-CAMPBELL, MARKJOHNSON, WARWICK RODWELL and JIM GOULD. Medieval: HEATHER JAMES, ROBERTA GILCHRIST, RICHARD MORRIS, PETER LEACH, PETER ELLIS, GRENVILLE G. ASTILL, SUSAN M. WRIGHT, MICKASTON and JAMES BOND. Modern: HAROLD MYTUM, PATRICIA M. ELLISON, IAN BURROW, RONJ. LAMPERT, ALAN TURNER, LAWRENCE BUTLER and L. WATTS.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780851153377 20160528
Green Library
Journal/Periodical
1 v. : ill. ; 31 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 212 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
xvi, 212 p. : ill.
Book
vi, 151 pages : maps, illustrations ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

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