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Book
xii, 258 pages : maps ; 24 cm.
Surviving Spanish Conquest reveals the transformation that occurred in Indian communities during the Spanish conquest of Hispaniola and Puerto Rico from 1492 to 1550. In Surviving Spanish Conquest: Indian Fight, Flight, and Cultural Transformation in Hispaniola and Puerto Rico, Karen F. Anderson-Cordova draws on archaeological, historical, and ethnohistorical sources to elucidate the impacts of sixteenth-century Spanish conquest and colonization on indigenous peoples in the Greater Antilles. Moving beyond the conventional narratives of the quick demise of the native populations because of forced labor and the spread of Old World diseases, this book shows the complexity of the initial exchange between the Old and New Worlds and examines the myriad ways the indigenous peoples responded to Spanish colonization. Focusing on Hispaniola and Puerto Rico, the first Caribbean islands to be conquered and colonized by the Spanish, Anderson-Cordova explains Indian sociocultural transformation within the context of two specific processes, emigration and immigration, highlighting how population shifts contributed to the diversification of peoples. For example, as the growing presence of "foreign" Indians from other islands complicated the variety of responses by Indian groups, her investigation reveals that Indians who were subjected to slavery, or the "encomienda system, " accommodated and absorbed many Spanish customs, yet resumed their own rituals when allowed to return to their villages. Other Indians fled in response to the arrival of the Spanish. The culmination of years of research, Surviving Spanish Conquest deftly incorporates archaeological investigations at contact sites, previously unstudied archival materials, and anthropological assessments of the contact period in the Caribbean. Ultimately, understanding the processes of Indian-Spanish interaction in the Caribbean enhances comprehension of colonization in many other parts of the world. Anderson-Cordova concludes with a discussion regarding the possible present-day survival of the Taino people and their culture. This volume provides a wealth of insight to historians, anthropologists, archaeologists, and those interested in early cultures in contact.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817319465 20171201
Green Library
Book
xii, 262 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • I. Theory and method
  • The Caribbean defined and the scope of archaeology
  • Method and theory
  • Colonial settlement and emergent capitalism
  • II. Archaeology
  • Nevis history, 1627-1833
  • An archaeology of plantation industrialization
  • Decline and adjustment, 1782-1833
  • III. Synthesis and conclusions
  • Environmental change in capitalism's shadow.
In this deeply researched and multifaceted study, Marco G. Meniketti demonstrates how the landscape of the small Caribbean island of Nevis preserves and reveals artifacts and evidence of the highly complex and interrelated seventeenth- to nineteenth-century "Atlantic Economy, " comprising early capitalist sugar production, the African slave trade, and European settlement. Sugar Cane Capitalism and Environmental Transformation is based on twelve seasons of meticulous archaeological field work and documentary research. Although Nevis was once a bustling hub of the British colonial project, the emigration of emancipated slaves and abandonment by European planters left large swathes of Nevis vacant. Reclaimed by forests and undisturbed by later waves of economic development, the island--dotted with fascinating ruins, debris from the sugar industry, windmills, chimneys, and multistoried great house--provided Meniketti with an ideal subject for archaeological inquiry. Through intensive archaeological and landscape surveys of multiple key plantation sites, Meniketti traces the development of Nevis from its initial European settlement in 1627 to its central role as a British mercantile hub and a laboratory and prototype of capitalist sugar cultivation. His nuanced analysis explains the backdrop of European political and economic rivalries, of which the colonial agro-industrial enterprises were the physical manifestations, and makes telling comparisons with Dutch and French archaeological sites. The work also compares and contrasts the adoption of capitalist modes of sugar production and socialization at wealthy and middling plantation sites. Supported with a wealth of photos, tables, and maps, Sugar Cane Capitalism and Environmental Transformation offers a vital case study of one island whose environment and archaeological record illuminates the complex webs of Atlantic history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817318918 20160912
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 314 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
A long sequence of social, cultural, and political processes characterizes an ever-dynamic Caribbean history. The Caribbean Basin is home to numerous linguistic and cultural traditions and fluid interactions that often map imperfectly onto former colonial and national traditions. Although much of this contact occurred within the confines of local cultural communities, regions, or islands, they nevertheless also include exchanges between islands, and in some cases, with the surrounding continents. recent research in the pragmatics of seafaring and trade suggests that in many cases long-distance intercultural interactions are crucial elements in shaping the social and cultural dynamics of the local populations. The contributors to "Islands at the Crossroads" include scholars from the Caribbean, the United States, and Europe who look beyond cultural boundaries and colonial frontiers to explore the complex and layered ways in which both distant and more intimate sociocultural, political, and economic interactions have shaped Caribbean societies from seven thousand years ago to recent times. ContributorsDouglas V. Armstrong / Mary Jane Berman / Arie Boomert / Alistair J. Bright / Richard T. Callaghan / L. Antonio Curet / Mark W. Hauser / Corinne L. Hofman / Menno L. P. Hoogland / Kenneth G. Kelly / Sebastiaan Knippenberg / Ingrid Newquist / Isabel C. Rivera-Collazo / Reniel Rodriquez Ramos / Alice V. M. Samson / Peter E. Siegel / Christian Williamson.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817356552 20160606
Green Library
Book
x, 332 p. : ill.
  • Introduction: Historical archaeology in Jamaica / Mark W. Hauser, James A. Delle, and Douglas V. Armstrong
  • pt. 1. The archaeology of the early colonial period
  • Feudalism or agrarian capitalism? : the archaeology of the early sixteenth-century Spanish sugar industry / Robyn P. Woodward
  • Port Royal and Jamaica : wrought-iron hand tools recovered as archaeological evidence and the material culture mentioned in probate inventories ca. 1692 / Marianne Franklin
  • Evidence for Port Royal's British colonial merchant class as reflected in the New Street Tavern Site assemblage / Maureen J. Brown
  • pt. 2. The archaeology of the plantation system
  • Reflections on Seville : rediscovering the African Jamaican settlements at Seville Plantation, St. Ann's Bay / Douglas V. Armstrong
  • Maritime connections in a plantation economy : archaeological investigations of a colonial sloop in St. Ann's Bay, Jamaica / Gregory D. Cook and Amy Rubenstein-Gottschamer
  • The habitus of Jamaican plantation landscapes / James A. Delle
  • Excavating the roots of resistance : the significance of Maroons in Jamaican archaeology / Candice Goucher and Kofi Agorsah
  • pt. 3. The archaeology of Jamaican society
  • Of earth and clay : locating colonial economies and local ceramics / Mark W. Hauser
  • Household market activities among early nineteenth-century Jamaican slaves : an archaeological case study from two slave settlements / Matthew Reeves
  • Assessing the impacts of time, agricultural cycles, and demography on the consumer activities of enslaved men and women in eighteenth-century Jamaica and Virginia / Jillian E. Galle-- Identity and opportunity in post-slavery Jamaica / Kenneth G. Kelly, Mark W. Hauser, and Douglas V. Armstrong
  • Epilogue: Explorations in Jamaican historical archaeology / Douglas V. Armstrong.
Out of Many, One People paints a complex and fascinating picture of life in colonial Jamaica, and demonstrates how archaeology has contributed to heritage preservation on the island.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817356484 20180521
Book
x, 332 p. : ill.
  • Introduction: Historical archaeology in Jamaica / Mark W. Hauser, James A. Delle, and Douglas V. Armstrong
  • pt. 1. The archaeology of the early colonial period
  • Feudalism or agrarian capitalism? : the archaeology of the early sixteenth-century Spanish sugar industry / Robyn P. Woodward
  • Port Royal and Jamaica : wrought-iron hand tools recovered as archaeological evidence and the material culture mentioned in probate inventories ca. 1692 / Marianne Franklin
  • Evidence for Port Royal's British colonial merchant class as reflected in the New Street Tavern Site assemblage / Maureen J. Brown
  • pt. 2. The archaeology of the plantation system
  • Reflections on Seville : rediscovering the African Jamaican settlements at Seville Plantation, St. Ann's Bay / Douglas V. Armstrong
  • Maritime connections in a plantation economy : archaeological investigations of a colonial sloop in St. Ann's Bay, Jamaica / Gregory D. Cook and Amy Rubenstein-Gottschamer
  • The habitus of Jamaican plantation landscapes / James A. Delle
  • Excavating the roots of resistance : the significance of Maroons in Jamaican archaeology / Candice Goucher and Kofi Agorsah
  • pt. 3. The archaeology of Jamaican society
  • Of earth and clay : locating colonial economies and local ceramics / Mark W. Hauser
  • Household market activities among early nineteenth-century Jamaican slaves : an archaeological case study from two slave settlements / Matthew Reeves
  • Assessing the impacts of time, agricultural cycles, and demography on the consumer activities of enslaved men and women in eighteenth-century Jamaica and Virginia / Jillian E. Galle-- Identity and opportunity in post-slavery Jamaica / Kenneth G. Kelly, Mark W. Hauser, and Douglas V. Armstrong
  • Epilogue: Explorations in Jamaican historical archaeology / Douglas V. Armstrong.
Out of Many, One People paints a complex and fascinating picture of life in colonial Jamaica, and demonstrates how archaeology has contributed to heritage preservation on the island.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817356484 20180521
Book
1 online resource (x, 332 pages) : illustrations, maps.
  • Introduction: Historical archaeology in Jamaica / Mark W. Hauser, James A. Delle, and Douglas V. Armstrong
  • pt. 1. The archaeology of the early colonial period
  • Feudalism or agrarian capitalism? : the archaeology of the early sixteenth-century Spanish sugar industry / Robyn P. Woodward
  • Port Royal and Jamaica : wrought-iron hand tools recovered as archaeological evidence and the material culture mentioned in probate inventories ca. 1692 / Marianne Franklin
  • Evidence for Port Royal's British colonial merchant class as reflected in the New Street Tavern Site assemblage / Maureen J. Brown
  • pt. 2. The archaeology of the plantation system
  • Reflections on Seville : rediscovering the African Jamaican settlements at Seville Plantation, St. Ann's Bay / Douglas V. Armstrong
  • Maritime connections in a plantation economy : archaeological investigations of a colonial sloop in St. Ann's Bay, Jamaica / Gregory D. Cook and Amy Rubenstein-Gottschamer
  • The habitus of Jamaican plantation landscapes / James A. Delle
  • Excavating the roots of resistance : the significance of Maroons in Jamaican archaeology / Candice Goucher and Kofi Agorsah
  • pt. 3. The archaeology of Jamaican society
  • Of earth and clay : locating colonial economies and local ceramics / Mark W. Hauser
  • Household market activities among early nineteenth-century Jamaican slaves : an archaeological case study from two slave settlements / Matthew Reeves
  • Assessing the impacts of time, agricultural cycles, and demography on the consumer activities of enslaved men and women in eighteenth-century Jamaica and Virginia / Jillian E. Galle
  • Identity and opportunity in post-slavery Jamaica / Kenneth G. Kelly, Mark W. Hauser, and Douglas V. Armstrong
  • Epilogue: Explorations in Jamaican historical archaeology / Douglas V. Armstrong.
Out of Many, One People paints a complex and fascinating picture of life in colonial Jamaica, and demonstrates how archaeology has contributed to heritage preservation on the island.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817356484 20180521
Book
1 online resource (xi, 202 pages) : illustrations, map. Digital: data file.
  • Preface: Intersecting values in Caribbean heritage preservation / Peter E. Siegel
  • The Bahamas / Michael P. Pateman
  • Cuba / Daniel Torres Etayo
  • United States Naval Station, Guantánamo Bay, Cuba / Bruce J. Larson
  • Jamaica / Andrea Richards and Ainsley Henriques
  • Dominican Republic / Esteban Prieto Vicioso
  • Puerto Rico / Peter E. Siegel
  • U.S. Virgin Islands / Elizabeth Righter
  • St. Kitts and Nevis / Todd M. Ahlman and Kelley Scudder-Temple
  • Antigua and Barbuda / Reg Murphy
  • French West Indies / Benoît Bérard and Christian Stouvenot
  • Saint Lucia / Milton Eric Branford
  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines / Paul E. Lewis
  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines: recent efforts in protecting heritage / Richard T. Callaghan
  • Barbados / Kevin Farmer
  • Trinidad and Tobago / Basil A. Reid and Vel Lewis
  • Netherlands Antilles / Jay B. Haviser and R. Grant Gilmore III
  • Patrimony or patricide? / William F. Keegan and Winston Phulgence
  • Protecting Heritage in the Caribbean / Peter E. Siegel.
In this volume, practitioners of heritage management on the frontline of their own islands address the current state of affairs across the Caribbean to present a comprehensive overview of Caribbean heritage preservation challenges. Considerable variability is seen in how determined and serious different nations are in approaching the responsibilities of heritage preservation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817356675 20180521
Book
xi, 202 p. : ill., map.
  • Preface: Intersecting values in Caribbean heritage preservation / Peter E. Siegel
  • The Bahamas / Michael P. Pateman
  • Cuba / Daniel Torres Etayo
  • United States Naval Station, Guantánamo Bay, Cuba / Bruce J. Larson
  • Jamaica / Andrea Richards and Ainsley Henriques
  • Dominican Republic / Esteban Prieto Vicioso
  • Puerto Rico / Peter E. Siegel
  • U.S. Virgin Islands / Elizabeth Righter
  • St. Kitts and Nevis / Todd M. Ahlman and Kelley Scudder-Temple
  • Antigua and Barbuda / Reg Murphy
  • French West Indies / Benoît Bérard and Christian Stouvenot
  • Saint Lucia / Milton Eric Branford
  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines / Paul E. Lewis
  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines: recent efforts in protecting heritage / Richard T. Callaghan
  • Barbados / Kevin Farmer
  • Trinidad and Tobago / Basil A. Reid and Vel Lewis
  • Netherlands Antilles / Jay B. Haviser and R. Grant Gilmore III
  • Patrimony or patricide? / William F. Keegan and Winston Phulgence
  • Protecting Heritage in the Caribbean / Peter E. Siegel.
In this volume, practitioners of heritage management on the frontline of their own islands address the current state of affairs across the Caribbean to present a comprehensive overview of Caribbean heritage preservation challenges. Considerable variability is seen in how determined and serious different nations are in approaching the responsibilities of heritage preservation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817356675 20180521
Book
xi, 202 p. : ill., map.
  • Preface: Intersecting values in Caribbean heritage preservation / Peter E. Siegel
  • The Bahamas / Michael P. Pateman
  • Cuba / Daniel Torres Etayo
  • United States Naval Station, Guantánamo Bay, Cuba / Bruce J. Larson
  • Jamaica / Andrea Richards and Ainsley Henriques
  • Dominican Republic / Esteban Prieto Vicioso
  • Puerto Rico / Peter E. Siegel
  • U.S. Virgin Islands / Elizabeth Righter
  • St. Kitts and Nevis / Todd M. Ahlman and Kelley Scudder-Temple
  • Antigua and Barbuda / Reg Murphy
  • French West Indies / Benoît Bérard and Christian Stouvenot
  • Saint Lucia / Milton Eric Branford
  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines / Paul E. Lewis
  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines: recent efforts in protecting heritage / Richard T. Callaghan
  • Barbados / Kevin Farmer
  • Trinidad and Tobago / Basil A. Reid and Vel Lewis
  • Netherlands Antilles / Jay B. Haviser and R. Grant Gilmore III
  • Patrimony or patricide? / William F. Keegan and Winston Phulgence
  • Protecting Heritage in the Caribbean / Peter E. Siegel.
In this volume, practitioners of heritage management on the frontline of their own islands address the current state of affairs across the Caribbean to present a comprehensive overview of Caribbean heritage preservation challenges. Considerable variability is seen in how determined and serious different nations are in approaching the responsibilities of heritage preservation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817356675 20180521
Book
ix, 206 p. : ill., maps.
  • Introduction : new currents in Cuban archaeology / Susan Kepecs and L. Antonio Curet
  • Prologue : homage to Dr. Betty Meggers / Lourdes Domínguez
  • Cuba and Florida : entwined histories of historical archaeologies / Kathleen Deagan
  • La Loma del Convento : its centrality to current issues in Cuban archaeology / Vernon James Knight, Jr.
  • New early tradition stone tool industries in Cuba / Lorenzo Morales Santos
  • Investigations at Laguna de Limones : suggestions for a change in the theoretical direction of Cuban archaeology / Daniel Torres Etayo
  • Recent archaeological fieldwork from the region around Los Buchillones : an indigenous site on the north-central Cuban coast / Jago Cooper, Roberto Valcarcel Rojas, and Jorge Calvera
  • Turey treasure in the Caribbean : brass and Indo-Hispanic contact at El Chorro de Maíta, Cuba / Roberto Valcárcel Rojas, Marcos Martinón-Torres, Jago Cooper, and Thilo Rehren
  • The archaeology of escaped slaves : utensils for resistance / Gabino La Rosa Corzo
  • Built patrimony and historical archaeology : problematic relations in working with the past / Iosvany Hernández Mora.
Book
ix, 206 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
This innovative volume builds on dialogues opened in recent years between Cuban archaeologists, whose work has long been carried out behind closed doors, and their international colleagues. The chapters included herein span a wide range of subjects across the full chronological spectrum. Most were written by emerging Cuban professionals who are breaking new ground; a few were penned by long-time leaders in the field. Issues addressed by the 17 contributors represented in this collection include the long-term cultural and intellectual links between Florida and Cuba, which influence shared research goals today; the limitations of theoretical frameworks for archaeology defined in the wake of the Cuban Revolution, and how to overcome them; the challenges involved in charting out the earliest human occupations on the island; the processes of Indo-Hispanic transculturation during the Colonial epoch; late pre-Colombian links between the Tainos of eastern Cuba and the rest of the Greater Antilles; and the theoretical and practical tensions between architectural restoration and the practice of scientific urban historical archaeology. Thus this volume makes a crucial contribution to the field of archaeology on many fronts, not the least of which is the sharing of information across the blockade.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817356330 20160605
Green Library
Book
xii, 696 p., xix p. of plates : ill, map.
Originally published: G'oteborg: Elanders boktryckeri aktiebolag, 1935.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817356378 20180521
Book
1 online resource (xiii, 267 pages) : illustrations.
  • Introduction
  • Culture history : toward a revamped perspective
  • The method, the sample, the contexts
  • Discovery of Puerto Rico and the lifeways of its earliest inhabitants
  • Coming, going, and interacting : an alternative perspective on the "la hueca problem"
  • Horizontal diversification in Puerto Rico : the forging of new identities
  • The intensification of regional political integration
  • Putting it all together.
The history of Puerto Rico has usually been envisioned as a sequence of colonizations-various indigenous peoples from Archaic through Taino were successively invaded, assimilated, or eliminated, followed by the Spanish entrada, which was then modified by African traditions and, since 1898, by the United States. The truth is more complex, but in many ways Puerto Rico remains one of the last colonies in the world. This volume focuses on the successive indigenous cultures of Puerto Rico prior to 1493. Traditional studies of the cultures of indigenous peoples of the Caribbean have centered on ceramic studies, based on the archaeological model developed by Irving Rouse which has guided Caribbean archaeology for decades. Rodriguez Ramos departs from this methodology by implementing lithics as the primary unit for tracing the origins and developments of the indigenous peoples of Puerto Rico. Analyzing the technological styles involved in the production of stone artifacts in the island through time, as well as the evaluation of an inventory of more than 500 radiocarbon dates recovered since Rouse's model emerged, the author presents a truly innovative study revealing alternative perspectives on Puerto Rico's pre-Columbian culture-historical sequence. By applying a multiscalar design, he not only not only provides an analysis of the plural ways in which the precolonial peoples of the island interacted and negotiated their identities but also shows how the cultural landscapes of Puerto Rico, the Antilles, and the Greater Caribbean shaped and were shaped by mutually constituting processes through time.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817356095 20180521
Book
xiii, 267 p. : ill.
The history of Puerto Rico has usually been envisioned as a sequence of colonizations-various indigenous peoples from Archaic through Taino were successively invaded, assimilated, or eliminated, followed by the Spanish entrada, which was then modified by African traditions and, since 1898, by the United States. The truth is more complex, but in many ways Puerto Rico remains one of the last colonies in the world. This volume focuses on the successive indigenous cultures of Puerto Rico prior to 1493. Traditional studies of the cultures of indigenous peoples of the Caribbean have centered on ceramic studies, based on the archaeological model developed by Irving Rouse which has guided Caribbean archaeology for decades. Rodriguez Ramos departs from this methodology by implementing lithics as the primary unit for tracing the origins and developments of the indigenous peoples of Puerto Rico. Analyzing the technological styles involved in the production of stone artifacts in the island through time, as well as the evaluation of an inventory of more than 500 radiocarbon dates recovered since Rouse's model emerged, the author presents a truly innovative study revealing alternative perspectives on Puerto Rico's pre-Columbian culture-historical sequence. By applying a multiscalar design, he not only not only provides an analysis of the plural ways in which the precolonial peoples of the island interacted and negotiated their identities but also shows how the cultural landscapes of Puerto Rico, the Antilles, and the Greater Caribbean shaped and were shaped by mutually constituting processes through time.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817356095 20180521
Book
xvi, 329 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Tibes : history and first archaeological work / Pedro Alvarado Zayas and L. Antonio Curet
  • The archaeological project of the Ceremonial Center of Tibes / L. Antonio Curet
  • Geophysical prospection at the ceremonial site of Tibes, 1998-2001 / Daniel Welch
  • Paleoethnobotanical research at Tibes / Lee A. Newsom
  • Animal use at the Tibes Ceremonial Center / Susan D. deFrance ... [et al]
  • Lithics from the Tibes ceremonial site : analysis of the stone artifacts from the 1996-1999 field seasons / Jeffery B. Walker
  • Boulder lithology survey at the Tibes ceremonial site / Scott Rice-Snow ... [et al]
  • Ancient bones tell stories : osteobiography of human remains from Tibes / Edwin F. Crespo-Torres
  • Bone chemistry and paleodiet at the Ceremonial Center of Tibes / William J. Pestle
  • Tibes and the social landscape : integration, interaction, and the community / Joshua M. Torres
  • Plazas, bateys, and ceremonial centers : the social and cultural context of Tibes in the ancient history of Puerto Rico / L. Antonio Curet and Joshua M. Torres.
The prehistoric civic-ceremonial center of Tibes is located on the southern coast of Puerto Rico, just north of the modern coastal city of Ponce. Protected on two sides by a river, and on the other two sides by hills, this approximately 10.5 acre site remains as fertile and productive today as when first occupied over 2,000 years ago. Such a rich region would have been a choice location for native people because of the diversity in all resources, from land, air, and sea - and also symbolically crucial as a liminal space within the landscape. It may have been regarded as a space charged with numen or cosmic energy where different parts of the cosmos (natural vs. supernatural, or world of the living vs. world of the dead) overlap. Archaeological evidence reveals a long occupation, about 1,000 years, possibly followed by an extensive period of sporadic ceremonial use after the site itself was practically abandoned. In this volume, nineteen Caribbeanists, across a wide academic spectrum, examine the geophysical, paleoethnobotanical, faunal, lithics, base rock, osteology, bone chemistry and nutrition, social landscape, and ceremonial constructs employed at Tibes. These scholars provide a concise, well-presented, comprehensive analysis of the evidence for local level changes in household economy, internal organization, accessibility to economic, religious, and symbolic resources related to the development and internal operation of socially stratified societies in the Caribbean.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817355791 20160603
Green Library
Book
xviii, 306 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Believers of Cemíism : who were the Taínos and where did they come from?
  • Webs of interaction : human beings, other beings, and many things
  • Personhood and the animistic Amerindian perspective
  • Contrasting animistic and naturalistic worldviews
  • The Cemí reveals its personhood and its body form
  • Cemí idols and Taínoan idolatry
  • Cemís and personal identities
  • The power and potency of the Cemís
  • The display of Cemís : personal vs. communal ownership, private vs. public function
  • Face-to-face interactions : Cemís, idols, and the native political elite
  • Hanging on to and losing the power of the Cemí idols
  • The inheritance and reciprocal exchange of Cemí icons
  • Cemís : alienable or inalienable; to give and to keep
  • Stone collars, elbow stones, and caciques
  • Ancestor Cemís and the Cemíification of the caciques
  • The guaíza face masks : gifts of the living for the living
  • The circulation of chief's names, women, and Cemís : between the greater and lesser Antilles
  • Up in arms : Taíno freedom fighters in Higüey and Boriquén
  • The virgin Mary icons and native Cemís : two cases of religious syncretism in Cuba
  • Religious syncretism and transculturation : the crossroads toward new identities
  • Final remarks.
Book
1 online resource (xviii, 306 pages) : illustrations, maps. Digital: data file.
  • Introduction
  • Believers of Cemíism : who were the Taínos and where did they come from?
  • Webs of interaction : human beings, other beings, and many things
  • Personhood and the animistic Amerindian perspective
  • Contrasting animistic and naturalistic worldviews
  • The Cemí reveals its personhood and its body form
  • Cemí idols and Taínoan idolatry
  • Cemís and personal identities
  • The power and potency of the Cemís
  • The display of Cemís : personal vs. communal ownership, private vs. public function
  • Face-to-face interactions : Cemís, idols, and the native political elite
  • Hanging on to and losing the power of the Cemí idols
  • The inheritance and reciprocal exchange of Cemí icons
  • Cemís : alienable or inalienable; to give and to keep
  • Stone collars, elbow stones, and caciques
  • Ancestor Cemís and the Cemíification of the caciques
  • The guaíza face masks : gifts of the living for the living
  • The circulation of chief's names, women, and Cemís : between the greater and lesser Antilles
  • Up in arms : Taíno freedom fighters in Higüey and Boriquén
  • The virgin Mary icons and native Cemís : two cases of religious syncretism in Cuba
  • Religious syncretism and transculturation : the crossroads toward new identities
  • Final remarks.
Cemís are both portable artifacts and embodiments of persons or spirit, which the Taínos and other natives of the Greater Antilles (ca. AD 1000-1550) regarded as numinous beings with supernatural or magic powers. This volume takes a close look at the relationship between humans and other (non-human) beings that are imbued with cemí power, specifically within the Taíno inter-island cultural sphere encompassing Puerto Rico and Hispaniola. The relationships address the important questions of identity and personhood of the cemí icons and their human?owners? and the implications of cemí gift-givin.
Book
121 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • The public interpretation of archaeological sites
  • A brief history of Mexican archaeology
  • Heritage and archaeological tourism in Mexico and Quintana Roo
  • Living in the Yucatan today
  • Discussion of problems and potential remedies
  • Mexican cultural identity and patrimony in Quintana Roo
  • Public interpretation at Mexican museums
  • Conclusion.
How can we effectively interpret and present one culture to another without stereotypes or over-simplifications? What is the best way to present an authoritative version of a national heritage without also endangering ancient sites or being insensitive to the local customs, beliefs, and religious practices of the indigenous peoples?This volume addresses the ongoing thrust in archaeology to take the next step after preserving the past: Interpreting that past for the future. That future audience includes both local citizens and tourists who may have little background in archaeology, anthropology, or the history of the culture featured. Walker presents the key components of the anthropological study of tourism as a global phenomenon, with particular emphasis on the more prominent arguments for how and why tourism is a universal and meaningful human activity. The highly controversial topic of authenticity is examined, with special attention given to how 'authentic' has been defined and how it relates to the ways in which archaeological sites, artifacts, and cultural traditions are presented - or not presented - to the visiting public.The ephemeral promise of 'authenticity' drives the heritage tourism industry, which is a key consideration for the long-term economy of the Maya Riviera and elsewhere. Through analysis of seven archaeological sites on the Yucatan peninsula that are open to heritage touring, Walker reveals the planned growth of the Maya Riviera since the early 1970s and examines the impact of international tourism on both ancient structures and the contemporary Maya people and culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817355142 20160528
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (xiv, 154 pages) : illustrations, maps.
  • Myth 1. Caribbean history started with the arrival of Christoper Columbus in 1492
  • Myth 2. The Arawaks and Caribs were the two major groups in the precolonial Caribbean
  • Myth 3. Columbus met Arawaks in the northern Caribbean
  • Myth 4. The natives encountered by Christopher Columbus in the northern Caribbean migrated from South America
  • Myth 5. The Arawaks were the first potters and farmers to have settled in the Caribbean
  • Myth 6. The Ciboneys lived in western Cuba at the time of Spanish contact
  • Myth 7. The Island-Caribs were cannnibals
  • Myth 8. All the Amerindians migrating from South America to the Caribbean island-hopped from the continent to the Lesser and Greater Antilles
  • Myth 9. The Spanish introduced syphilis into the Caribbean and the new world
  • Myth 10. Christopher Columbus wrote the version of his "Diario" (diary) that we use today
  • Myth 11. The Spanish colonists brought "civilization" to native societies in the Caribbean.
"This book seeks to debunk eleven popular and prevalent myths about Caribbean history. Using archaeological evidence, it corrects many previous misconceptions promulgated by history books and oral tradition as they specifically relate to the pre-Colonial and European-contact periods. It informs popular audiences, as well as scholars, about the current state of archaeological/historical research in the Caribbean Basin and asserts the value of that research in fostering a better understanding of the region's past. Contrary to popular belief, the history of the Caribbean did not begin with the arrival of Europeans in 1492. It actually started 7,000 years ago with the infusion of Archaic groups from South America and the successive migrations of other peoples from Central America for about 2,000 years thereafter. In addition to discussing this rich cultural diversity of the Antillean past, Myths and Realities of Caribbean History debates the misuse of terms such as 'Arawak' and 'Ciboneys, ' and the validity of Carib cannibalism allegations"--EBL book details.

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