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Book
XVIII, 301 pages ; 19 cm.
  • History and evolution
  • Arguments for and against the death penalty
  • An overview of the death penalty through Furman v. Georgia (1972)
  • Gregg v. Georgia and the modern system of death penalty regulation
  • Defining capital crimes
  • Aggravating and mitigating circumstances
  • Special defenses
  • Overview of arrest through execution
  • Jury selection and role of jurors
  • Guilt stage of trial process
  • Sentencing stage of trial process
  • Appeals process
  • Post-conviction challenges
  • Clemency and execution proceedings
  • Assistance of defense counsel
  • Race, gender, and other biases
  • Executing the innocent
  • Foreign and international law issues
  • Postscript: Future of the death penalty.
This death penalty Nutshell covers both the substantive and procedural law of capital cases, along with relevant history, jurisprudence and constitutional law. It addresses international issues, the complex role of defense counsel, systemic bias, and execution of the innocent. Statutory and case law, as well as all relevant data, are current as of mid-2016 providing a basis for broad exploration of academic and pragmatic issues for lawyers, law students and others interested in the law's most serious punishment.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781634603027 20170321
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xix, 228 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
xiii, 260 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • When Bundy buckles up
  • From rehabilitation to retribution
  • "Inside your daddy's house": capital punishment and creeping nihilism in the atomic age
  • "The respect which is due them as men": the rise of retribution in a polarizing nation
  • Executable subjects
  • Fixed risks and free souls: judging and executing capital defendants after Gregg v. Georgia
  • Shock therapy: the rehabilitation of capital punishment
  • The killing state
  • "A country worthy of heroes": the old West and the new American death penalty
  • Father knows best: capital punishment as a family value
  • Epilogue: disabling freedom.
In the mid-1990s, as public trust in big government was near an all-time low, 80% of Americans told Gallup that they supported the death penalty. Why did people who didn't trust government to regulate the economy or provide daily services nonetheless believe that it should have the power to put its citizens to death? That question is at the heart of Executing Freedom, a powerful, wide-ranging examination of the place of the death penalty in American culture and how it has changed over the years. Drawing on an array of sources, including congressional hearings and campaign speeches, true crime classics like In Cold Blood, and films like Dead Man Walking, Daniel LaChance shows how attitudes toward the death penalty have reflected broader shifts in Americans' thinking about the relationship between the individual and the state. Emerging from the height of 1970s disillusion, the simplicity and moral power of the death penalty became a potent symbol for many Americans of what government could do and LaChance argues, fascinatingly, that it's the very failure of capital punishment to live up to that mythology that could prove its eventual undoing in the United States.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226066691 20170117
Green Library

4. The death penalty [2013]

Book
207 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Is the death penalty just and ethical? Why I support the death penalty / Edward Koch ; Justice is not served with the death penalty / Raymond Lesniak ; Christian doctrine supports capital punishment / Bryan Fisher ; Christian doctrine does not support capital punishment / United States Conference of Catholic Bishops
  • Does the death penalty serve the public good? The death penalty deters crime / David Mulhausen ; The death penalty isn't the answer to crime woes / Jack Weil ; The cost of the death penalty outweighs its benefits to society / Julie Delcour ; The death penalty is essential, and its cost is irrelevant / Derek Schmidt ; Death penalty would end punishment of victim's family / Irl Stambaugh and Gary Stambaugh ; The death penalty does not fulfill survivors' needs for closure / Susan Bandes, as told to Murder Victims' Families for Human Rights
  • Is the death penalty applied fairly? The capital punishment system is still racially biased / David A. Love ; Racial bias in the capital punishment system has decreased over time / Charles Lane ; DNA testing reveals serious problems in the capital punishment system / Radley Balko ; DNA testing cannot solve fundamental flaws in the capital punishment system / Juan Roberto Meléndez-Colón ; People with mental illness should be exempt from the death penalty / Susannah Sheffer ; Many people with mental illness should not be exempt from the death penalty / Sam Vaknin
  • Should the death penalty be abolished or reformed? Death penalty is dead wrong : it's time to outlaw capital punishment in America, completely / Mario M. Cuomo ; The death penalty should not be abolished / Bruce Fein ; Why death-penalty opponents can't win / Jonah Goldberg ; Executions should stop until the capital punishment process is reformed / Michael Hall ; The death penalty cannot be reformed and should be abolished / Richard C. Dieter ; Incarceration for life without parole could replace the death penalty / Robert Johnson and Sandra McGunigall-Smith.
Green Library
Book
xxii, 319 p. ; 19 cm.
  • History and evolution
  • Arguments for and against the death penalty
  • Basic constitutional challenges and limitations
  • Constitutional parameters of the current era death penalty
  • Defining capital crimes
  • Aggravating and mitigating circumstances
  • Special defenses
  • Overview of arrest through execution
  • Jury selection and role of jurors
  • Guilt stage of trial process
  • Sentencing stage of trial process
  • Appeals process
  • Post-conviction challenges
  • Clemency and execution proceedings
  • Assistance of defense counsel
  • Race, gender and other biases
  • Executing the innocent
  • Foreign and international law issues
  • Postscript: Future of the death penalty.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 456 p. ; 25 cm.
  • In cold blood
  • On crimes and punishments
  • The abolitionists
  • America's founding fathers
  • The Eighth Amendment
  • Capital punishment in America
  • The road to abolition.
The conventional wisdom is that the founders were avid death penalty supporters. In this fascinating and insightful examination of America's Eighth Amendment, law professor John D. Bessler explodes this myth and shows the founders' conflicting and ambivalent views on capital punishment. Cruel and Unusual takes the reader back in time to show how the indiscriminate use of executions gave way to a more enlightened approach-one that has been evolving ever since. While shedding important new light on the U.S. Constitution's "cruel and unusual punishments" clause, Bessler explores the influence of Cesare Beccaria's essay, On Crimes and Punishments, on the Founders' views, and the transformative properties of the Fourteenth Amendment, which made the Bill of Rights applicable to the states. After critiquing the U.S. Supreme Court's existing case law, this essential volume argues that America's death penalty-a vestige of a bygone era in which ear cropping and other gruesome corporal punishments were thought acceptable-should be declared unconstitutional.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781555537166 20160607
Green Library
Book
xiv, 456 p. ; 25 cm.
  • In cold blood
  • On crimes and punishments
  • The abolitionists
  • America's founding fathers
  • The Eighth Amendment
  • Capital punishment in America
  • The road to abolition.
The conventional wisdom is that the founders were avid death penalty supporters. In this fascinating and insightful examination of America's Eighth Amendment, law professor John D. Bessler explodes this myth and shows the founders' conflicting and ambivalent views on capital punishment. Cruel and Unusual takes the reader back in time to show how the indiscriminate use of executions gave way to a more enlightened approach-one that has been evolving ever since. While shedding important new light on the U.S. Constitution's "cruel and unusual punishments" clause, Bessler explores the influence of Cesare Beccaria's essay, On Crimes and Punishments, on the Founders' views, and the transformative properties of the Fourteenth Amendment, which made the Bill of Rights applicable to the states. After critiquing the U.S. Supreme Court's existing case law, this essential volume argues that America's death penalty-a vestige of a bygone era in which ear cropping and other gruesome corporal punishments were thought acceptable-should be declared unconstitutional.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781555537166 20160607
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 v. (various pagings) ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction to capital punishment law
  • The death penalty debate
  • Sources of law
  • Challenges to the constitutionality of the death penalty
  • Methods of execution
  • Modern death penalty statutes
  • The death penalty trial
  • Categorical bars to the death penalty
  • Overview of aggravating evidence : the eligibility function and the selection function
  • Aggravating circumstances : eligibility of the case for the death penalty
  • Aggravating evidence and the selection decision
  • Selection process : mitigation
  • Selection process : the life or death decision
  • Direct appeals
  • Postconviction proceedings : the writ of Habeas Corpus
  • Ineffective assistance of counsel
  • Innocence
  • Clemency
  • Death row issues : insanity and death row phenomenon
  • Race and the death penalty
  • Gender bias and the death penalty
  • Volunteers : defendants who want to die
  • International treaty rights and the use of foreign law in death penalty cases
  • The federal death penalty
  • Military death penalty
  • The death penalty in a global context
  • Evolving attitudes on capital punishment : the move away from the death penalty
  • Future issues in capital punishment law.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 232 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Getting the question right? : ways of thinking about the death penalty / Randall McGowen
  • Modes of capital punishment : the death penalty in historical perspective / David Garland
  • The death penalty : between law, sovereignty, and biopolitics / Michael Meranze
  • Through the wrong end of the telescope : history, the death penalty, and the American experience / Randall McGowen
  • Hanging and the English judges : the judicial politics of retention and abolition / Douglas Hay
  • Interposition : segregation, capital punishment, and the forging of the post-New Deal political leader / Jonathan Simon
  • The convict's two lives : civil and natural death in the American prison / Rebecca McLennan.
Over the past three decades, the United States has embraced the death penalty with tenacious enthusiasm. While most of those countries whose legal systems and cultures are normally compared to the United States have abolished capital punishment, the United States continues to employ this ultimate tool of punishment. The death penalty has achieved an unparalleled prominence in American public life and left an indelible imprint on its politics and culture. It has also provoked intense scholarly debate, much of it devoted to explaining the roots of American exceptionalism. America's Death Penalty takes a different approach to the issue by examining the historical and theoretical assumptions that have underpinned the discussion of capital punishment in the United States today. At various times the death penalty has been portrayed as an anachronism, an inheritance, or an innovation, with little reflection on the consequences that flow from the choice of words. This volume represents an effort to restore the sense of capital punishment as a question caught up in history. Edited by leading scholars of crime and justice, these original essays pursue different strategies for unsettling the usual terms of the debate. In particular, the authors use comparative and historical investigations of both Europe and America in order to cast fresh light on familiar questions about the meaning of capital punishment. This volume is essential reading for understanding the death penalty in America.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780814732670 20160605
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 144 p. ; 23 cm.
  • "I didn't intend to kill nobody"
  • "I am n-n-not dying"
  • "Struck by lightning"
  • "Death is different"
  • "Let's do it"
  • The "mirror test"
  • "The machinery of death".
In his first book since the Pulitzer Prize - winning "Polio: An American Story", renowned historian David Oshinsky takes a new and closer look at the Supreme Court's controversial and much-debated stances on capital punishment - in the landmark case of Furman v. Georgia. Career criminal William Furman shot and killed a homeowner during a 1967 burglary in Savannah, Georgia. Because it was a 'black-on-white' crime in the racially troubled South, it also was an open-and-shut case. The trial took less than a day, and the nearly all-white jury rendered a death sentence. Aided by the NAACP's Legal Defense Fund, Furman's African-American attorney, Bobby Mayfield, doggedly appealed the verdict all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which in 1972 overturned Furman's sentence by a narrow 5-4 vote, ruling that Georgia's capital punishment statute, and by implication all other state death-penalty laws, was so arbitrary and capricious as to violate the Eighth Amendment's prohibition against 'cruel and unusual punishment'. Furman effectively, if temporarily, halted capital punishment in the United States. Every death row inmate across the nation was resentenced to life in prison. The decision, however, did not rule the death penalty per se to be unconstitutional; rather, it struck down the laws that currently governed its application, leaving the states free to devise new ones that the Court might find acceptable. And this is exactly what happened. In the coming years, the Supreme Court would uphold an avalanche of state legislation endorsing the death penalty. Capital punishment would return stronger than ever, with many more defendants sentenced to death and eventually executed. Oshinsky demonstrates the troubling roles played by race and class and region in capital punishment. And he concludes by considering the most recent Supreme Court death-penalty cases involving minors and the mentally ill, as well as the impact of international opinion. Compact and engaging, Oshinsky's masterful study reflects a gift for empathy, an eye for the telling anecdote and portrait, and a talent for clarifying the complex and often confusing legal issues surrounding capital punishment.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780700617111 20160604
Green Library
Book
xxv, 278 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Homicide detectives and other investigative personnel
  • Prosecutors
  • Victims' family members
  • Defense attorneys
  • Offenders' family members
  • Trial judges
  • Jurors
  • Postconviction counsel and appellate judges
  • Prison wardens
  • Death row corrections officers and execution team members
  • Execution witnesses and governors.
Green Library
Book
xxix, 552 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • General research directions and challenges
  • The process leading to a capital sentence
  • The process beyond the sentencing decision
  • The utility and efficacy of the capital sanction
  • Examinating the punishment of death.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 374 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Acknowledgments viii-- Introduction: Toward and Beyond the Abolition of Capital Punishment 1-- Charles Ogletree and Austin Sarat-- Part I. Assessing the Prospects for Abolition-- 1. The Executioner's Waning Defenses: The Eroding Defense of the Executioner 24-- Michael L. Radelet-- 2. Blinded by Science on the Road to Abolition? 65-- Simon A. Cole and Jay D. Aronson-- 3. Abolition in the U.S.A. by 2050: On Political Capital and Ordinary Acts of Resistance 104-- Bernard E. Harcourt-- 4. The Beginning of the End? 142-- Carol S. Steiker and Jordan M. Steiker-- 5. Rocked but Still Rolling: The Enduring Institution of Capital Punishment in Historical and Comparative Perspective 204-- Michael McCann and David T. Johnson-- Part II. For Execution Methods Challenges, The Road to Abolition is Paved with Paradox-- 6. For Execution Methods Challenges, The Road to Abolition is Paved with Paradox 264-- Deborah W. Denno-- 7. Perfect Execution: Abolitionism and the Paradox of Lethal Injection 307-- Timothy V. Kaufman-Osborn-- 8. "No improvement over electrocution or even a bullet": Lethal Injection and the Meaning of Speed and Reliability in the Modern Execution Process 362-- Jurgen Martschukat-- Part III. Putting the Death Penalty in Context-- 9. Torture, War, and Capital Punishment: Linkages and Missed Connections 403-- Robin Wagner-Pacifici-- 10. Making Difference: Modernity and the Political Dimensions of Death 455-- Peter Fitzpatrick-- Index-- About the Contributors.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780814762189 20160528
At the start of the twenty-first century, America is in the midst of a profound national reconsideration of the death penalty. There has been a dramatic decline in the number of people being sentenced to death as well as executed, exonerations have become common, and the number of states abolishing the death penalty is on the rise. The essays featured in "The Road to Abolition?" track this shift in attitudes toward capital punishment, and consider whether or not the death penalty will ever be abolished in America. The interdisciplinary group of experts gathered by Charles J. Ogletree Jr., and Austin Sarat ask and attempt to answer the hard questions that need to be addressed if the death penalty is to be abolished. Will the death penalty end only to be replaced with life in prison without parole? Will life without the possibility of parole become, in essence, the new death penalty? For abolitionists, might that be a pyrrhic victory? The contributors discuss how the death penalty might be abolished, with particular emphasis on the current debate over lethal injection as a case study on why and how the elimination of certain forms of execution might provide a model for the larger abolition of the death penalty.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780814762189 20160528
Law Library (Crown)

14. The death penalty [2008]

Book
p. 365-645 : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Foreword : the perpetual controversy / Christopher M. Johnson
  • The death penalty and the society we want / Stephen B. Bright
  • The emerging death penalty jurisprudence of the Roberts Court / Kenneth C. Haas
  • The abolitionist's dilemma : establishing the standards for the evolving standards of decency / Dwight Aarons
  • Completely unguided discretion : admitting non-statutory aggravating and non-statutory mitigating evidence in capital sentencing trials / Sharon Turlington
  • Death is unconstitutional : how capital punishment became illegal in America : a future history / Dr. Jur. Eric Engle
  • The death penalty and reversible error in Massachusetts / Alan Rogers
  • Escape from death row : a study of "tripping" as an individual adjustment strategy among death row prisoners / Sandra McGunigall-Smith & Robert Johnson.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxii, 319 p. ; 19 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 174 p. ; 24 cm.
  • INTRODUCTION-- CHAPTER 1: HISTORY AND OVERVIEW OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT-- CHAPTER 2: METHODS OF EXECUTION-- CHAPTER 3: THE FEDERAL DEATH PENALTY-- CHAPTER 4: LEGAL REPRESENTATION-- CHAPTER 5: INNOCENCE-- CHAPTER 6: DEMOGRAPHICS-- CHAPTER 7: MENTAL DISABILITIES AND THE DEATH PENALTY-- CHAPTER 8: SENTENCE REVIEW-- APPENDICES-- GLOSSARY-- BIBLIOGRAPHY AND ADDITIONAL SUGGESTED READING.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195376555 20160528
Legal Almanac Series, Law for the Layperson This series is written for people at all levels of experience and education who are seeking legal advice without having to immediately contact a legal representative. The series covers topics from divorce, disability, establishing a company/LLC, copyright and patent protection, abuse, adoption, and many more. The series is a popular general reference set that offers practical information and guidance for many of life's common legal questions. All volumes provide important case law and legislation, charts and tables for comparison, and glossaries, making the legal Almanacs the most practical one-stop reference available for lawyers and every man. 10-12 volumes are added annually to the set, including revisions of timely and pertinent topics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195376555 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xviii, 475 p. ; 26 cm.
Green Library
Book
xix, 235 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Death penalty history and the myth of community bonding
  • The myth of the rule of law in capital cases
  • The myth of equal justice
  • The myth of deterrence
  • The myth of fidelity to the Constitution
  • The myth of humane execution
  • The myth of closure
  • The myth of retribution
  • The myth of effective crime control
  • The myth of the dedicated public servant
  • Conclusion.
The death penalty remains one of the most controversial issues in the United States. In this comprehensive review of the major death penalty issues, the authors systematically dismantle myths about capital punishment in a hard-hitting critique of how our social, political, and community leaders have used fear and myth (symbolic politics) to misrepresent the death penalty as a public policy issue. They successfully demonstrate how political and community leaders have used myth and emotional appeals to misrepresent the facts about capital executions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780275997809 20160528
Green Library
Book
xii, 191 p. ; 23 cm.
Capital punishment attracts strong and opposing moral positions execution by the state under any condition is wrong versus execution as just retribution for heinous killing. Using evidence from legal history, this book rejects these moral arguments as a basis for determining the social value of the death penalty and considers the issue scientifically by determining whether capital punishment deters willful killing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780761834724 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vi, pages 205-494 ; 26 cm
  • Symposium foreword / Lyn Entzeroth
  • Dead wrong in Oklahoma / Randall Coyne
  • Why it is so difficult to prove innocence in capital cases / Kenneth Williams
  • The meaninglessness of delayed appointments and discretionary grants of capital postconviction counsel / Celestine Richards McConville
  • Is it constitutional to execute someone who is innocent (and if it isn't, how can it be stopped following House v. Bell)? / David R. Dow, Jared Tyler, Frances Bourliot, Jennifer Jeans
  • Dead innocent : the death penalty abolitionist search for a wrongful execution / Jeffrey L. Kirchmeier
  • Innocent of a capital crime : parallels between innocence of a crime and innocence of the death penalty / Ellen Kreitzberg, Linda Carter.
Law Library (Crown)

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