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Book
xii, 524 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxviii, 441 p. : ill., port., facsims. ; 25 cm.
  • v. 1. Wieland. Memoirs of Carwin, the biloquist -- v. 2. Ormond, or, The secret witness -- v. 3. Arthur Mervyn -- v. 4. Edgar Huntly, or, Memoirs of a sleep-walker -- v. 5. Clara Howard. Jane Talbot -- v. 6. Alcuin. Memoirs of Stephen Calvert.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780873381604 20160527
Green Library
Book
xii, 582 p. ; 22 cm.
Testing the limits of religious and literary authority in the new United States, Charles Brockden Brown's novel Wieland (1798) is the first gothic novel in America and a cornerstone of the American literary canon. Also reprinted is Memoirs of Carwin the Biloquist, Brown's sequel to Wieland. Explanatory annotations are provided throughout this Norton Critical Edition. Inspirations for Brown's work are presented in "Sources and Contexts". "Criticism" includes contemporary responses to the novel along with fourteen modern critical approaches.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393932539 20160605
Green Library
Book
xliv, 365 p. ; 20 cm.
Set in rural Pennyslvania in the 1760s, this tale of horror and mystery is based on an actual case of a New York farmer who murdered his family. The author employs Gothic devices and sensational features such as spontaneous combustion, ventriloquism, and religious fanaticism. Fiendish Carwin uses his influence over Clara Wieland and her family, destroying the order and authority of the small community in which they live. The novel examines some fundamental issues crucial to the survival of democracy in the new American republic. The unfinished sequel, Memoirs of Carwin the Biloquist, traces Carwin's career as a follower of the utopist Ludloe.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780140390797 20160528
Green Library
Book
xxxv, 294 p. ; 20 cm.
One of the earliest American novels, Wieland (1798) is a thrilling tale of suspense and intrigue set in rural Pennyslvania in the 1760s. Based on an actual case of a New York farmer who murdered his family, the novel employs Gothic devices and sensational elements such as spontaneous combustion, ventriloquism, and religious fanaticism. The plot turns on the charming but diabolical intruder Carwin, who exercises his power over the narrator, Clara Wieland, and her family, destroying the order and authority of the small community in which they live. Underlying the mystery and horror, however, is a profound examination of the human mind's capacity for rational judgement. The text also explores some of the most important issues vital to the survival of democracy in the new American republic. Brown further considers power and manipulation in his unfinished sequel, Memoirs of Carwin the Biloquist, which traces Carwin's career as a disciple of the utopist Ludloe.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199538775 20160528
Green Library
Book
xxxv, 294 p.; 19 cm.
One of the earliest American novels, Wieland (1798) is a tale of suspense and intrigue that explores some of the most important issues vital to the survival of democracy in the new American republic. This book is intended for students of American literature, especially early American novels, from undergraduate level upwards.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780192828767 20160528
Green Library
Book
xi, 438 p. : port. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiii, 495 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiii, 478 p. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
xvii, 539 p., [2] leaves of plates : facsims. ; 25 cm.
Green Library

11. Jane Talbot [1827]

Book
234 p. 20 cm.
Special Collections
Book
7 volumes : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Contents Acknowledgments I. The Letters of Charles Brockden Brown (1788-1809) II. Early Epistolary Writings A. Henrietta letters (1790 / 1792) B. Godolphin and Ellendale fragments. 1. Godolphin Fragment (1793) 2. Ellendale Fragment (1793) Illustrations Historical Essay Textual Essay Census of the Letters of Charles Brockden Brown Description of Provenance Biographies of Correspondents Genealogy of the Brown and Linn Families Bibliography and Works Cited Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781611484441 20160612
Charles Brockden Brown (1771-1810) is a key writer of the revolutionary era and U.S. early republic, known for his landmark novels and other writings in a variety of genres. The Collected Writings of Charles Brockden Brown presents all of Brown's non-novelistic writings-letters, political pamphlets, fiction, periodical writings, historical writings, and poetry-in a seven-volume scholarly edition. The edition's volumes are edited to the highest scholarly standards and will bear the seal of the Modern Language Association's Committee on Scholarly Editions (MLA-CSE). Letters and Early Epistolary Writings, volume 1 of the series, presents, for the first time, Brown's complete extant correspondence along with three early epistolary fiction fragments. Brown's 179 extant letters provide essential context for reading his other works and a wealth of information about his life, family, associates, and the wider cultural life of the revolutionary period and Early Republic. The letters document the interactions of Brown's intellectual and literary circles in Philadelphia and during his New York years, when his publishing career began in earnest. The correspondence additionally includes exchanges with notables including Thomas Jefferson and Albert Gallatin. The volume's three epistolary fragments are the earliest examples of Brown's fiction and are transcribed here for the first time in complete and definitive texts. The volume's historical texts are fully annotated and accompanied by Historical and Textual Essays, as well as other appended materials, including the most complete and accurate information available concerning Brown's correspondents and family history. The scholarly work informing this volume establishes significant new findings concerning Brown, his family and friends, and the circumstances of his development as a major literary figure of the revolutionary Atlantic world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781611484441 20160612
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
liv, 414 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
As it tells the story of Constantia Dudley, from her family's financial collapse to her encounters with a series of cosmopolitan revolutionaries and reactionaries, Charles Brockden Brown's "Ormond or The Secret Witness (1799)" develops a sustained meditation on late-Enlightenment debates concerning political liberty, women's rights, conventions of sex-gender, and their relation to the reshaping of an Atlantic world in the throes of transformation. This edition of "Ormond" includes Brown's "Alcuin (1798)", an important dialogue on women's rights and marriage, as well as his key essays on history and literature, along with selections from contemporary writings on women's education and revolution debates that figure in the novel's background and in the charged atmosphere of the late 1790s.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781603841269 20160603
Green Library
Book
xlvii, 353 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
A thrilling tale that leads from ventriloquism and mania to a family murder and emotional breakdown, Charles Brockden Brown's "Wieland or The Transformation" (1798) ties revolutionary-era Gothic themes to struggles over the politics of Enlightenment on both sides of the Atlantic. This edition of "Wieland" includes Brown's "Memoirs of Carwin" the "Biloquist" and writings on Cicero, as well as his key essays on history and literature, and selections from contemporary German and other texts that figure in the novel's background and in the charged atmosphere of the late 1790s.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780872209756 20160527
Green Library
Book
xlv, 442 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
An influential classic of American gothic and urban literature, Charles Brockden Brown's "Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs of the Year 1793" (1799-1800) memorialises the epic Philadelphia Yellow Fever epidemic of 1793 and connects it to the upheavals of the revolutionary era and the murderous financial networks of Atlantic slavery. This edition of Brown's widely-read novel offers selections from key contemporary texts - including Richard Allen and Absalom Jones' "Narrative" (1794) defending the city's Free Black community, Godwin's "Enquiry Concerning Political Justice" (1793), Laurence Sterne's "Sentimental Journey" (1768), 1790s abolitionist tracts by members of Brown's circle, and popular poetry on the slave trade and imperial commerce - as well as excerpts from Brown's own writings on slavery, race, and the uses of history in fiction.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780872209220 20160527
Green Library
Book
xliii, 269 p. ; 24 cm.
In addition to the definitive UVA text of Brown's seminal novel, this edition includes an introduction setting the work in its historical, literary, and intellectual contexts. Selections from William Godwin's "Inquiry Concerning Political Justice" (1793), Erasmus Darwin's "Zoonomia" or "The Laws of Organic Life" (1794), Benjamin Franklin's "A Narrative of the Late Massacres" (1764), and Thomas Barton's "The conduct of the Paxton-men" (1764) are included here, as are several of Brown's lesser-known but revealing writings on such subjects as somnambulism and the uses of history in fiction.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780872208544 20160527
Green Library

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