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Book
xv, 414 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • * Biodiversity in the Green Economy: Setting the stage 2. Biodiversity in the Green Economy: what biodiversity do we need? 3. Chapter Biodiversity and the Forestry Sector 4. Uncovering hidden trade-offs in the Green Economy: Biodiversity and the manufacturing, transport and renewable energy sectors 5. The multifaceted contribution of biodiversity to human wellbeing: Lessons from The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) Initiative 6. Promoting sustainable use of biodiversity in socio-ecological production landscapes 7. Biodiversity and ecosystem services in European cultural landscapes: Pathways, pitfalls, and perspectives 8. Guiding principles for green economic development in the marine environment: Insights from small-scale fisheries and marine protected areas 9. Green Infrastructure: A bridging concept between biodiversity conservation and the Green Economy 10. Organizational, management and accounting perspectives on biodiversity 11. Payments for ecosystem services as a mechanism to promote biodiversity conservation in a Green Economy: Potentials and limitations 12. REDD+ forest carbon investments, biodiversity and the promise of a Green Economy 13. Biodiversity governance: A global perspective from the Convention on Biological Diversity 14. Exploring barriers to the integration of biodiversity concerns across EU policy 15. Biodiversity and green governance in Brazil: Innovative solutions to target resources for conservation and equity 16. The Green Economy as an Opportunity to Improve U.S. Biodiversity Assistance 17. Biodiversity in the Green Economy: moving beyond the rhetoric.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415723329 20160618
In the past decade, the growing realization that biodiversity and human wellbeing are inextricably linked has led to the adoption of numerous environmental policies. The concept of the Green Economy has gained particular attention as an economic system where growth is possible within environmental limits. The preservation of ecosystem services and the halt of biodiversity loss are identified as key pillars of the Green Economy. Despite the concept's momentum there is still no clear understanding of how biodiversity fits within a Green Economy. In the current debate, biodiversity is rarely acknowledged in economic sectors other than agriculture, forestry, fisheries and tourism, and when it is acknowledged biodiversity and its conservation feature more as buzzwords than as concrete and tangible components of the Green Economy. This book aims to identify, understand and offer pragmatic recommendations of how biodiversity conservation can become an agent of green economic development. This book establishes ways to assess biodiversity's contributions to the economy and to meaningfully integrate biodiversity concerns in green-economy policies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415723329 20160618
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
196 p. : col. ill., col. maps ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
52 p. : ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 30 cm.
Green Library, Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
vi, 272 p. ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
50 p. : ill. ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 78 pages : color maps ; 29 cm
On the completion of a decade of the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan in TAL, Nepal.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Map
1 map : color ; 42 x 59 cm
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Map
1 map : color ; 59 x 42 cm
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
2 v. : ill., maps (some col.) ; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
v. : digital, PDF file.
Book
x, 385 p. : ill. ; 24 cm
  • Contents: PART I: BACKGROUND 1. Human values and the conservation of wild species: an overview 2. Basic theory: the economic value of wild species, their conservation and use PART II: VALUES AND SUPPORT FOR THE CONSERVATION OF INDIVIDUAL SPECIES AS WELL AS SUSTAINABLE USE STRATEGIES 3. Changed values and increased support for wildlife conservation as a result of ecotourism: a sea turtle study 4. The economic worth of conserving the Asian elephant 5. Australia's curious tree-kangaroos: important influences (particularly knowledge) on support for their conservation 6. The social net economic benefit of conserving an endangered marsupial glider: economic and ecological considerations 7. Support for conserving the likeable koala versus that for a critically endangered species of wombat 8. The hawksbill turtle - its conservation and use: public values, attitudes and policies 9. Saltwater crocodiles: human values, conservation and sustainable use PART III: VALUES AND SUPPORT FOR THE CONSERVATION OF MULTIPLE SPECIES AS WELL AS SUSTAINABLE USE STRATEGIES 10. Public support for conserving reptile species: stated values for different species and comparative support for their conservation 11. Influences of knowledge on wildlife valuation and support for conserving species 12. The relative importance of likeability and endangerment for payments to conserve species 13. The similarity principle and public support for the survival of wildlife species 14. The comparative probability of species of mammals, birds and reptiles being selected for survival when only a limited number of species can be chosen 15. Public support for sustainable wildlife harvesting and biodiversity conservation: a case study 16. Public attitudes to wildlife use by Indigenous Australians: conservation issues, marketing and the economic viability of aboriginal wildlife enterprises.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781782544388 20160616
This pioneering book explores the influence of human values on the willingness of individuals to pay for the conservation of individual wildlife species (and classes of these), to be for or against their survival, and to favour or oppose their harvesting. Clement Tisdell combines original theories, survey results and experimental findings to assess the economic benefit of conserving particular wild species and to suggest strategies for a sustainable future. With a detailed analysis of 25 species, covering the three classes (mammals, birds and reptiles), this book examines how variations in knowledge and social factors can influence individuals' evaluation of species. Moreover, economics and ecology are combined to propose sound policies for wildlife management and to provide estimates of the net economic benefit of conserving particular species. The first work to provide such extensive analysis of human values and conservation, this book is an essential resource for economists, ecologists and all those interested in wildlife management, environment and nature conservation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781782544388 20160616
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
xii, 153 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
xviii, 397 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Biodiversity Conservation and Poverty Reduction: An Introduction to the Debate Part I: Linking Biodiversity Conservation and Poverty Reduction - Where, How and Why? Editors' Introduction 2. Biodiversity Conservation and the Eradication of Poverty 3.Linking Conservation and Poverty Reduction: Landscapes, People and Power 4. Poverty, Development and Biodiversity Conservation: Shooting in the Dark? 5. Livelihoods, Forests and Conservation in Developing Countries: An Overview Part II: Conservation's Place in International Development Editors' Introduction 6. Integrating the Rio Conventions into Development Co-operation 7. Wildlife and Poverty Study 8. Striking a Balance: Ensuring Conservation's Place on the International Biodiversity Assistance Agenda 9. Report of the Ad Hoc Open-ended Working Group of Review of Implementation of the Convention 10. Contested Relationships between Biodiversity Conservation and Poverty Alleviation 11. Poverty and Conservation: The New Century's 'Peasant Question?' 12. Making Poverty Reduction Irreversible: Development Implications of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment Part III: Conservation Policy and Protectionism Editors' Introduction 13. Protected Areas and Poverty - The Linkages and How to Address Them 14. Conservation Policy and Indigenous Peoples 15. The Role of Protected Areas in Conserving Biodiversity and Sustaining Local Livelihoods. 16. Eviction for Conservation: A Global Overview 17. Political Ecology and the Costs and Benefits of Protected Areas 18. A Property Rights Approach to Understanding Human Displacement from Protected Areas: The Case of Marine Protected Areas Part IV: Conservation NGOs and Poor People Editors' Introduction 19. Two Agendas on Amazon Development 20. International Conservation Organisations and the Fate of Local Tropical Forest Conservation Initiatives 21. A Challenge to Conservationists 22. Conservation, Development and Poverty Alleviation: Time for a Change in Attitudes 23. Conserving What and for Whom? Why Conservation Should Help Meet Basic Needs in the Tropics 24. Disentangling the Links between Conservation and Poverty Reduction in Practice Part V: New Developments: Ecosystem Services, Carbon and Climate Change Editors' Introduction 25. Ecosystems and Human Well-being: Current State and Trends 26. Selling Out on Nature (and letters in response) 27. Payments for Environmental Services and the Poor: Concepts and Preliminary Evidence 28. Climate, Carbon, Conservation and Communities 29. Protecting the Future: Carbon, Forests, Protected Areas and Local Livelihoods 30. Seeing REDD? Forests, Climate Change Mitigation the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities Part VI: Moving Beyond the Debate - The Need for Conservation-poverty Partnerships Editors' Introduction 31. Partnerships for Conservation and Poverty Reduction 32. Common Ground between Anthropology and Conservation Biology 33. Thinking Like a Human: Social Science and the Two Cultures Problem.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781844078431 20160604
In the last decade biodiversity loss and persistent poverty in developing countries have been recognised as major international problems that require urgent attention. However, the nature and scale of the links between these two problems, and between efforts to address them, has been the subject of much heated debate. Understanding the different elements of this debate is critical if we are to move towards constructive solutions. This Reader provides a guide to, and commentary on, the different strands of the current conservation-poverty debate through a selection of key readings from both the conservation and development literature including policy documents, journal articles and reports. The breadth of material will help readers, including both students and professionals, to locate current debates within their wider contexts. Among the areas of debate covered are: ' The lack of attention to biodiversity concerns in international development policy ' The social implications of protectionist conservation policy ' The roles and responsibilities of conservation NGOs towards local communities ' The links between climate change, biodiversity and poverty reduction, and in particular the implication of discussions around reduced emissions from deforestation (REDD) as a climate change mitigation strategy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781844078431 20160604
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 351 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm.
This book brings together a selection of 21 original studies submitted to Biodiversity and Conservation that address aspects of management for the conservation of biodiversity. The topics addressed include: lessons from the Northern spotted owl saga, hidden costs of implementing the EU Habitats Directive, the importance of recently created agricultural wetlands, cutting reeds to create a sustainable habitat, impacts and control of feral cats, selecting areas to complement existing reserve systems, beneficial effects of rabbit warrens, effects of fences on large predator ranges, spatial structure of critical habitats and connectivity, effects of an agro-pasture landscape on biodiversity, community involvement, reserve selection in forests, germ-plasm interventions in agroforestry systems, shade coffee plantations and the protection of tree diversity, and reserves and the reduction of deforestation rates in dry tropical forests. It also includes: reconciling forest conservation actions with usage by and needs of local people, weed invasion in understory plant communities in tropical lowland forests, problems of patch area and connectivity in plant conservation, the need not to focus just on hot-spots, and partitioning conservation across elevations. The organisms and communities considered embrace birds, coral reefs, various large and small mammals, reptiles, forest trees, and dune and boreal semi-natural grassland plants. The contributions are taken from situations being confronted in regions including the Andaman Islands, Brazil, Canary Islands, the Caribbean, Finland, Germany, Guinea, India, Italy, Mexico, Myanmar, Poland, South Africa, Spain, and the USA. Collectively, the studies presented here provide a snap-shot of the types of management actions being undertaken for conservation and their efficacy. This makes the volume especially valuable for use in conservation biology courses. It is reprinted from "Biodiversity and Conservation, volume 18, No 4" (2009).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789048138449 20160605
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 318 p. : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 24 cm.
This book brings together a selection of 22 original studies submitted to Biodiversity and Conservation that address aspects of methods and practice in biodiversity conservation. The contributions deal with a wide variety of approaches to site selection and management, especially the use of bioindicators, surrogates, and other approaches to site selection. As no complete inventory of all taxa in any one site has yet been achieved, alternative strategies are essential and bioindicators or surrogates come to the fore. The articles included cover a wide range of organisms used in such approaches to in situ conservation: annelids, anurans, arthropods, birds, bryophytes, butterflies, collembolans, flowering pants, a lobster, molluscs, rodents, and turtles. Further, the habitats considered here embrace estuaries, forests, freshwater, grasslands, the marine, mountains, and sand-dunes, and are drawn from a wide range of countries - notably Australia, Brazil, India, Italy, Mexico, Nigeria, Spain, Switzerland, Tanzania, and the U. K. Cryopreservation, well established for ex situ preservation of bacteria and fungi, is shown here also applied to bryophyte conservation. Finance is always a problem, and the final contribution examines the sources of money available for conservation action in an examplar country, Mexico. Collectively, the studies presented here provide a snap-shot of the range of methods and practices in use in the conservation of biodiversity today. This makes the volume especially valuable for use in conservation biology and biodiversity management courses. It is reprinted from "Biodiversity and Conservation, Volume 18 No 5 (2009)".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789048138487 20160605
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvii, 228 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Saving Biological Diversity: An Overview.-What Are We Trying to Save? And Why? Toward a Policy-Relevant Definition of Biodiversity.-Part I Protecting Populations of Particular Species.-Navigating for Noah, Setting New Directions for Endangered Species Protection in the 21st Century.-Economics of Protecting Endangered Species.-Center for Plant Conservation: Twenty Years of Recovering America's Vanishing Flora.-The Piping Plover as an Umbrella Species for the Barrier Beach Ecosystem.-Restoring Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) to New England.-Part II Saving an Ecosystem Through Endangered Species Recovery: Conservation of the Ivory-billed Woodpecker.-Sea Change: Changing Management to Protect Ocean Ecosystems.-Valuation of Natural Resource Improvements in the Adirondacks.-Minimum Dynamic Areas for Matrix Forest Ecosystems.-Restoring America's Everglades: A National Imperative.-Part III The Need for Global Efforts to Save Biological Diversity.-Implications of Local Conservation and Land Protection for the Global Environment.-Creative Approaches to Preserving Biodiversity in Brazil and the Amazon.-International Treaties and Laws on Biodiversity Protection.-Advancing Conservation in a Globalized Worls.-New Perspectives.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780387095660 20160528
The distinctive contribution of this book is that it presents a pragmatic approach for preserving biological diversity. Experts in a wide variety of fields, including philosophy, environmental policy, law, economics and biology, present different perspectives on how to prevent widespread extinction around the world. Several chapters deal with basic questions such as how we should define biodiversity and how we should determine what is most important to save. Two chapters focus on how we can place an economic value on biological diversity, a step that is often critical for gaining acceptance for conservation efforts. One of the major conclusions is that people are often willing to pay to preserve natural systems that have no immediate value in terms of generating income or commodities. Other chapters are case studies of efforts to protect particular species or ecosystems; these provide practical guidelines for how to protect biodiversity more effectively.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780387095660 20160528
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 375 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Some ecosystem management plans established by state and federal agencies have begun to shift their focus away from single-species conservation to a broader goal of protecting a wide range of flora and fauna, including species whose numbers are scarce or about which there is little scientific understanding. To date, these efforts have proved extremely costly and complex to implement. Are there alternative approaches to protecting rare or little-known species that can be more effective and less burdensome than current efforts?"Conservation of Rare or Little-Known Species" represents the first comprehensive scientific evaluation of approaches and management options for protecting rare or little-known terrestrial species. The book brings together leading ecologists, biologists, botanists, economists, and sociologists to classify approaches, summarize their theoretical and conceptual foundations, evaluate their efficacy, and review how each has been used.Contributors consider combinations of species and systems approaches for overall effectiveness in meeting conservation and ecosystem sustainability goals. They discuss the biological, legal, sociological, political, administrative, and economic dimensions by which conservation strategies can be gauged, in an effort to help managers determine which strategy or combination of strategies is most likely to meet their needs. Contributors also discuss practical considerations of implementing various strategies."Conservation of Rare or Little-Known Species" gives land managers access to a diverse literature and provides them with the basic information they need to select approaches that best suit their conservation objectives and ecological context. It is an important new work for anyone involved with developing land management or conservation plans.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781597261661 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 375 p. : ill.
  • 1. Introduction / Martin G. Raphael and Bruce G. Marcot
  • 2. Conservation goals and objectives / Martin G. Raphael ... [et al.]
  • 3. Species rarity : definition, causes, and classification / Curtis H. Flather and Carolyn Hull Sieg
  • 4. Definitions and attributes of little-known species / Randy Molina and Bruce G. Marcot
  • 5. Special considerations for the science, conservation, and management of rare or little-known species / Bruce G. Marcot and Randy Molina
  • 6. Species-level strategies for conserving rare or little-known species / Bruce C. Marcot and Curtis H. Flather
  • 7. System-level strategies for conserving rare or little-known species / Bruce G. Marcot and Carolyn Hull Sieg
  • 8. Effectiveness of alternative management strategies in meeting conservation objectives / Richard S. Holthausen and Carolyn Hull Sieg
  • 9. Social considerations / John D. Peine
  • 10. Economic considerations / Richard L. Johnson, Cindy S. Swanson, and Aaron J. Douglas
  • 11. Implementation considerations / Deanna H. Olson
  • 12. A process for selection and implementation of conservation approaches / Martin G. Raphael ... [et al.].
Book
vi, 272 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

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