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Book
xvii, 355 p. ; 23 cm.
  • On the Song of Songs
  • Homilies on the Gospels
  • Ecclesiastical history of the English people.
Green Library
Book
224 p. ; 20 cm.
Green Library
Book
216 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiv, 222 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
  • Illustrations Acknowledgements Abbreviations Introduction Date and Purpose of On the Nature of Things (ONT) and On Times (OT) Structure and Content of ONT and OT Unity of Conception of ONT and OT The Place of ONT and OT in Bede's Thought Bede's template: Isidore of Seville's De natura rerum (DNR) Bede's transformation of Isidore's DNR Bede's Attitude Toward Isidore The Easter Controversy and the Pedagogy of Computus The Christian World-Chronicle Bede's Science: Continuities and New Directions The Transmission of ONT and OT The reception of ONT and OT: glosses and excerpts Principles Governing this Translation Inventory of Manuscripts and Editions of Bede's ONT and OT Bede: On the Nature of Things A Poem of Bede the Priest The Chapters of On the Nature of Things 1. The Fourfold Work of God 2. The Formation of the World 3. What the World Is 4. The Elements 5. The Firmament 6. The Varied Height of Heaven 7. Upper Heaven 8. The Heavenly Waters 9. The Five Circles of the World 10. The Regions of the World 11. The Stars 12. The Course of the Planets 13. Their Order 14. Their Orbits 15. Why Their Colours Change 16. The Circle of the Zodiac 17. The Twelve Signs 18. The Milky Way 19. The Course and Size of the Sun 20. The Nature and Place of the Moon 21. Method for Determining the Course of the Moon through the Signs of the Zodia 22. The Eclipse of the Sun and the Moon 23. Where there is No Eclipse and Why 24. Comets 25. The Air 26. The Winds 27. The Order of the Winds 28. Thunder 29. Lightning 30. Where Lightning is Not and Why 31. The Rainbow 32. Clouds 33. Rains 34. Hail 35. Snow 36. Signs of Storms or Fair Weather 37. Pestilence 38. On the Dual Nature of the Waters 39. The Ocean's Tide 40. Why the Sea does Not Grow in Size 41. Why It is Bitter 42. The Red Sea 43. The Nile 44. That the Earth is Bound by Waters 45. The Position of the Earth 46. That the Earth is Like a Globe 47. The Circles of the Earth 48. More on the Same Subject: the Art of Using Sundials 49. Earthquake 50. The Fire of Mount Etna 51. The Division of the Earth Bede: On Times The Chapters of On Times 1. Moments and Hours 2. The Day 3. The Night 4. The Week 5. The Month 6. The Months of the Romans 7. Solstice and Equinox 8. The Seasons 9. Years 10. The Leap-Year Day 11. The Nineteen-Year Cycle 12. The 'Leap of the Moon' 13. The Contents of the Paschal Cycle 14. The Formulas for the Headings of the Pascal Tables 15. The Sacrament of the Easter Season 16. The Ages of the World 17. The Sequence and Order of Times 18. The Second Age 19. The Third Age 20. The Fourth Age 21. The Fifth Age 22. The Sixth Age Commentary: On the Nature of Things Commentary: On Times Appendix 1: Bede: A Hymn on the Work of the First Six Days and the Six Ages of the World Appendix 2: An Excursus on Bede's Mathematical Reasoning Appendix 3: Bede's Calculation of Tidal Periods and the Purported 'Immaturity' of On the Nature of Things Appendix 4: Bede and Lucretius Select Bibliography Index of Sources General Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781846314964 20160605
The Venerable Bede composed On the Nature of Things (De natura rerum) and On Times (De temporibus) at the outset of his career, about AD 703. Bede fashioned himself as a teacher to his people and his age, and these two short works show him selecting, editing, and clarifying a mass of difficult and sometimes dangerous material. He insisted that his reader understand the mathematical and physical basis of time, and though he was dependent on his textual sources, he also included observations of his own. But Bede was also a Christian exegete who thought deeply and earnestly about how salvation-history connected to natural history and the history of the peoples of the earth. To comprehend his religious mentality, we have to take on board his views on "science" -- and vice versa. On the Nature of Things is a survey of cosmology. Starting with Creation and the universe as a whole, Bede reads the cosmos downwards from the heavens, through the atmosphere, to the oceans and rivers of earth. This order (recapitulating the four elements or fire, air, water and earth) was derived from his main source, Isidore of Seville's On the Nature of Things. However, Bede separated out Isidore's chapters on time, and dealt with them in On Times. On Times, like its "second, revised and enlarged edition" The Reckoning of Time (De temporum ratione), works upwards from the smallest units of time, through the day and night, the week, month and year, to the world-ages. Bede's innovation is to introduce a practical manual of Easter reckoning, or computus, into this survey. Hidden beneath the matter-of-fact surface of the work is an intense polemic about the correct principles for determining the date of Easter -- principles which in Bede's view are bound up with both the integrity of nature as God's creation, and the theological significance of Christ's death and resurrection. In these works Bede re-united cosmology and time-reckoning to form a unified science of computus that would become the framework for Carolingian and Scholastic basic scientific education.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781846314964 20160605
Green Library
Book
397 p. : maps ; 20 cm.
  • Book one: the situation of Britain and Ireland - their earliest inhabitants-- on Gaius Julius Caesar, the first Roman to reach Britain-- Claudius - the second Roman to reach Britain - annexes the Isles of Orkney to the Roman Empire - under his direction Vespasian subdues the Isle of Wight-- Lucius - a British king - writes to Pope Eleutherus and asks to be made a Christian-- Severus divides Roman Britain from the rest by an earth work-- the reign of Diocletian - his persecution of the Christian Church-- the martyrdom of Saint Alban and his companions - who shed their life-blood for Christ at this time-- the Church in Britain enjoys peace from the end of this persecution until the time of the Arian heresy-- during the reign of Gratian - Maximus is created Emperor in Britain and returns to Gaul with a large army-- during the reign of Arcadius - the Briton Pelagius presumptuously belittles the grace of God-- during the reign of Honorius - Gratian and Constantine set up as despots in Britain - the former is killed shortly afterwards in Britain - the latter in Gaul-- the Britons - harassed by the Irish and Picts - seek help from the Romans - who come and build a second wall across the island - notwithstanding, these enemies again break in and reduce the Britons to worse straits-- during the reign of Theodosius the Younger - Palladius is sent to the Christians among the Irish - the Britons make an unsuccessful appeal to the Consul Aetius-- the Britons made desperate by famine drive the Barbarians out of their land - there soon follows an abundance of corn - luxury - plague - and doom on the nation. (Part contents).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780140445657 20160528
Written in AD 731, Bede's work opens with a background sketch of Roman Britain's geography and history. It goes on to tell of the kings and bishops, monks and nuns who helped to develop Anglo-Saxon government and religion during the crucial formative years of the English people. Leo Sherley-Price's translation brings us an accurate and readable version, in modern English, of a unique historical document. This edition now includes Bede's Letter to Egbert concerning pastoral care in early Anglo-Saxon England, at the heart of which lay Bede's denunciation of the false monasteries; and The Death of Bede, an admirable eye-witness account by Cuthbert, monk and later Abbot of Jarrow, both translated by D. H. Farmer.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780140445657 20160528
Green Library
Book
606 p. : 4 folded charts ; 26 cm.
Green Library
Book
471 p. ; 26 cm.
Green Library
Book
xii, 359 p. ; 26 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 343 pages ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
330 pages : maps ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
175 p. : map ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction \ Extracts from The Ecclesiastical History of the English People \ Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781441181923 20160609
Bede's best known work, An Ecclesiastical History of the English People, was written in Latin and is not immediately easy to understand and follow. Yet it is a key text for any student of English history. Rowan Williams shows in his introduction how Bede works to create a sense of national destiny for the new English kingdoms of the seventh century, a sense that has helped to shape English self-awareness through the centuries, by using the imagery both of imperial Rome and of biblical Israel. But Bede also wrestles with the difficult question of how the Church relates to and serves the political order. The attraction and fascination of his work is partly in seeing the tension between the strategic use of wealth and political power for religious ends and the example of self-effacing service and simplicity of life offered by some of Bede's greatest Christian heroes. The issues around these questions are not academic or antiquarian. Understanding Bede is a key to understanding British society in the present as well as the past.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781441181923 20160609
Green Library

15. On Genesis [2008]

Book
xii, 359 p. ; 21 cm.
This is the first English translation of the Venerable Bede's commentary on the book of Genesis. Dealing as it does with the biblical account of the creation of the world and of mankind, and of mankind's fall from grace and exile into the life of time, "On Genesis" offers essential insights into Bede's fundamental assumptions as a theologian, historian, and scientific cosmologist. Bede's role in laying the foundations of the modern world cannot be overemphasised. From his quantitative approach to questions of science to his introduction of the Anno Domini system of dating and his text-critical methods of biblical analysis, he anticipated and influenced modern ways of thinking. Bede regarded the opening chapters of Genesis as the foundation narrative of the world. From it, Bede derived the theoretical basis for his scientific treatises and his notion of the English as a chosen people of God, which informs the Ecclesiastical History. This translation and introduction attempts to make Bede's commentary accessible to anyone with an interest in his work.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781846310881 20160528
Green Library
Book
v. ; 21 cm.
  • v. 1. Libri I-II / a cura di Michael Lapidge ; traduzione di Paolo Chiesa
  • v. 2. Libri III-V / a cura di Michael Lapidge ; traduzione di Paolo Chiesa
Green Library
Book
xliv, 260 p ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
v. : map ; 20 cm.
  • t. 1. Livres I-II
  • t. 2. Livres III-IIII
  • t. Livre V.
Green Library

19. Le tabernacle [2003]

Book
505 p. ; 20 cm.
Green Library
Book
1 microfilm reel : positive ; 35 mm.
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