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Book
xii, 172 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction I. At the Crossroads 1. Universal Design in a Digital World 2. iAccessbility from iTunes 1.0 to iPad 3. Building Digital Stairways: Nice View, But What About My Wheelchair? II. How Did We Get Here? 4. We Want You in Our Network: Universal Design V Retrofitting the Web 5. (Physical) Disability Is a Form of Social Oppression? 6. Does That Face-'Book' Come in Braille? Social Networking Sites and Disability III. Where to Next? 7. Avatars with Wheelchairs, But No Virtual Guide Dogs: Disability and Second Life 8. Challenges and Opportunities: The Road Ahead for Disability in a Digital World Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415871358 20160602
Disability and New Media examines how digital design is triggering disability when it could be a solution. Video and animation now play a prominent role in the World Wide Web and new types of protocols have been developed to accommodate this increasing complexity. However, as this has happened, the potential for individual users to control how the content is displayed has been diminished. Accessibility choices are often portrayed as merely technical decisions but they are highly political and betray a disturbing trend of ableist assumption that serve to exclude people with disability. It has been argued that the Internet will not be fully accessible until disability is considered a cultural identity in the same way that class, gender and sexuality are. Kent and Ellis build on this notion using more recent Web 2.0 phenomena, social networking sites, virtual worlds and file sharing. Many of the studies on disability and the web have focused on the early web, prior to the development of social networking applications such as Facebook, YouTube and Second Life. This book discusses an array of such applications that have grown within and alongside Web 2.0 , and analyzes how they both prevent and embrace the inclusion of people with disability.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415871358 20160602
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (1 v.) : ill.
  • Fundamentals
  • Document structure
  • Text
  • Images
  • Data tables
  • Layout tables
  • Frames
  • Lists
  • Forms
  • Links
  • Color
  • Audio and video
  • Interactivity
  • Editorial style
  • Page layout.
In just over a decade, the Web has evolved from an experimental tool for a limited community of technically inclined people into a day-to-day necessity for millions upon millions of users. Today's Web designers must consider not only the content needs of the sites they create, but also the wide range of additional needs their users may have: for example, those with physical or cognitive disabilities, those with slow modems or small screens, and those with limited education or familiarity with the Web. Bestselling author Sarah Horton argues that simply meeting the official standards and guidelines for Web accessibility is not enough. Her goal is universal usability, and in Access by Design: A Guide to Universal Usability for Web Designers, Sarah describes a design methodology that addresses accessibility requirements but then goes beyond. As a result, designers learn how to optimize page designs to work more effectively for more users, disabled or not.Working through each of the main functional features of Web sites, she provides clear principles for using HTML and CSS to deal with elements such as text, forms, images, and tables, illustrating each with an example drawn from the real world. Through these guidelines, Sarah makes a convincing case that good design principles benefit all users of the Web. In this book you will find: / Clear principles for using HTML and CSS to design functional and accessible Web sites / Best practices for each of the main elements of Web pages--text, forms, images, tables, frames, , links, interactivity, and page layout / Seasoned advice for using style sheets that provide flexibility to both designer and user without compromising usability / illustrations of actual Web sites, from which designers can model their own pages / Instructions for providing keyboard accessibility, flexible layouts, and user-controlled environments / Practical tips on markup, and resources.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780321311405 20160711
Book
1 online resource (4 pages) : illustrations
Book
1 online resource (1 v.) : ill.
  • Complete blindness
  • Visual accessibility : other types
  • Audio accessibility
  • Physical accessibility
  • Cognitive disabilities
  • Selling accessibility
  • Additional resources.
The 508 handbook is written for the developer or designer who wants to make accessible websites, but doesn't know where to begin. The reader will not only be introduced to the various audiences covered under 508 and their limitations and assistive technologies, but be given practical advice on how to make a website for them, while not compromising the overall design. Practical examples are provided, as well as heuristics to guide them during the development of completely new technologies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781449322854 20160615
Book
1 online resource (xix, 365 p.) : ill.
  • Introduction to HTML5 Acessibility Understanding Disability and Assistive Technology JavaScript Isn't a Dirty Word, and ARIA Isn't Just Beautiful Music API and DOM HTML5, the New Semantics and New Approaches to Document Markup Images, Rich Media, Audio and Video in HTML 5 HTML5 and Accessible Data Tables HTML5 and Accessible Forms HTML5, Usability and User-Centered Design Tools, Tips, and Tricks: Assessing Your Acessible HTML5 Project WCAG 2.0 Client-Side Scripting Techniques Definition of WAI-ARIA Roles.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781430241942 20160608
Pro HTML5 Accessibility helps designers come to grips with building exciting, accessible and usable web sites and applications with HTML5. The book covers how to use HTML5 in order to serve the needs of people with disabilities and older persons using assistive technology (AT). It aims to be a useful 'go-to' guide, providing practical advice. It takes several approaches, including a look at the new semantics of HTML5 and how to combine its use with authoring practices you know from using earlier versions of HTML. It also demonstrates how HTML5 content is currently supported (or not) by assistive technologies such as screen readers, and what this means practically for accessibility in your web projects. The HTML5 specification is huge, with new APIs and patterns that can be difficult to understand. Accessibility can also seem complex and nuanced if you have no experience interacting with people with disabilities. This book walks you though the process of designing exciting user interfaces that can potentially be used by everyone, regardless of ability. Accessibility is really a quality design issue, and getting it right is often more a matter of approach than having sophisticated, cutting-edge tools at your disposal. This book will be your companion in your journey to understand both HTML5 and accessibility, as the author has many years of experience as a designer and web developer working directly with people with all types of disabilities. He has been involved with the development of HTML5 from an accessibility perspective for many years, as a member of the W3C WAI Protocols and Formats working group (which is responsible for ensuring W3C specifications are serving the needs of people with disabilities) as well as the HTML5 Working Group itself. * Introduces the new HTML5 specification from an accessibility perspective * Shows how incorporating accessibility into your interfaces using HTML5 can have benefits for all users * Explains how HTML5 is currently supported by assistive technologies like screen readers, and how to work around these limitations when developing What you'll learn * Gain an overview of assistive technologies and how they work with web content, as well as how to approach accessibility in your design projects * Learn how HTML5 differs from HTML4 and earlier * Understand how to practically apply HTML5 to your web projects in order to design accessible content. * See what works and what doesn't * Learn the new semantics and structures within HTML5, and how to use them to build more accessible websites and applications * See which HTML5 elements and attributes are supported by browsers and assistive technologies, and what this means for the user experience of people with disabilities * Understand which parts of HTML5 are not well supported by browsers and assistive technology * Get a snapshot of current support, its limitations, and how to design and code in a way that will support older assistive technologies and browsers as well as more feature-rich, newer technologies * Learn how CSS, JavaScript, and WAI-ARIA can be used with HTML5 to support the development of accessible web content Who this book is for Pro HTML5 Accessibility is for the intermediate to advanced web designer and developer who is already building websites and applications but needs some help in understanding accessibility and how it relates to HTML5. The book can be read as a basic introduction to HTML5 and accessibility, but may be more suited to the professional or experienced designer who already has knowledge of HTML4 (or earlier) as well as CSS, WAI-ARIA and JavaScript. While no detailed knowledge of CSS, WAI-ARIA or scripting is really required, it will help the reader to understand some of the design patterns and examples discussed in the book. Table of Contents * Introduction to HTML5 Acessibility * Understanding Disability and Assistive Technology * JavaScript Isn't a Dirty Word, and ARIA Isn't Just Beautiful Music * API and DOM * HTML5, the New Semantics and New Approaches to Document Markup * Images, Rich Media, Audio and Video in HTML 5 * HTML5 and Accessible Data Tables * HTML5 and Accessible Forms * HTML5, Usability and User-Centered Design * Tools, Tips, and Tricks: Assessing Your Acessible HTML5 Project * WCAG 2.0 Client-Side Scripting Techniques * Definition of WAI-ARIA Roles.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781430241942 20160608
Book
1 online resource (v, 139 p.) : ill.
"This book looks at what accessibility is and the various reasons, such as legislative or legal, as to why you really need to understand accessibility and then create websites that can be used by everyone. This book therefore examines the diverse range of user requirements that need to be considered for humans to successfully use web technologies. If you have no experience of being around, or working with, people with disabilities then it can be very difficult to successfully design user interfaces that cover their needs. This book will show you how you can both understand some of the various needs of people with disabilities and the technology they use to interact with computers and the Web. This book provides a short, practical guide to ensure that your Joomla! web site is accessible and usable by the widest audience."--Resource description page.
Book
xxii, 340 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Contents Acknowledgements Chapter One: Introduction: Social Disability Part One: Advocacy Chapter Two: The Social Media and Deaf Empowerment. Polish Deaf Communities Online Fight for Representation (Magdalena Zdrodowska) Chapter Three: Personal reflections on the #107days campaign. Transformative, subversive or accidental? (Sara Ryan and George Julian) Chapter Four: Confirming Normalcy: 'Inspiration Porn' and the Construction of the Disabled Subject? (Beth Haller and Jeffrey Preston) Chapter Five: Bedding Out: art, activism and Twitter (Lucy Burke and Liz Crow) Part Two: Access Chapter Six: The growing importance of accessible social media (Scott Hollier) Chapter Seven: Transport mesadapte: Exploring online disability activism in Montreal (Laurence Parent and Marie-Eve Veilleux) Chapter Eight: Interactive inclusive - Designing tools for activism and empowerment (Tom Bieling, Tiago Martins and Gesche Joost) Chapter Nine: New Media and Accessible Emergency Communications: A United States-Based Meta Analysis (DeeDee Bennett, Helena Mitchell and Paul M. A. Baker) Part Three: Communications Chapter Ten: Social Media Use and Mediated Sociality Among Individuals with Communication Disabilities in the Digital Age (Meryl Alper and Beth Haller) Chapter Eleven: #socialconversations: disability representation and audio description on Marvel's Daredevil (Katie Ellis) Chapter Twelve: Articulating Vulnerability and Interdependence in Networked Social Space (Brian Goldfarb and John Armenta) Chapter Thirteen: Social media and disability inclusion: Critical reflections of a Zimbabwean activist (Kudzai Shava) Part Four: Education Chapter Fourteen: Opportunities for eLearning, social media and disability (Mike Kent) Chapter Fifteen: A Phenomenology of Media Making Experience: Disability Studies and Wearable Cameras (D. Andy Rice) Chapter Sixteen: Blackboard as in/accessible social media: Updating education, teaching and learning (Leanne McRae) Chapter Seventeen: Dyslexics 'Knowing How' to challenge 'Lexism' (Craig Collinson and Owen Barden) Part Five: Community Chapter Eighteen: 'Talking my language': The AthletesFirst project and the use of blogging in virtual disability sport communities (Andrea Bundon) Chapter Nineteen: Posting autism: Online self-representation strategies in Tistje, a Flemish blog on Living on the spectrum from the front row (Anneleen Masschelein and Leni Van Goidsenhoven) Chapter Twenty: From awareness to inclusion: Creating bridges with the disability community through social media and civil society in Japan (Muneo Kaigo) Part Six: New Directions Chapter Twenty one: Self-representation considerations for people who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and social media (Amanda Hynan, Janice Murray and Juliet Goldbart) Chapter Twenty two: Disability and discourse: An Arabian example (Najma Al Zidjaly) Chapter Twenty three: Using social media to advance the social rights of people with disability in China: The Beijing One Plus One Disabled Persons' Cultural Development Centre (Jian Xu, Mike Kent, Katie Ellis and He Zhang).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472458452 20170313
Social media is popularly seen as an important media for people with disability in terms of communication, exchange and activism. These sites potentially increase both employment and leisure opportunities for one of the most traditionally isolated groups in society. However, the offline inaccessible environment has, to a certain degree, been replicated online and particularly in social networking sites. Social media is becoming an increasingly important part of our lives yet the impact on people with disabilities has gone largely unscrutinised. Similarly, while social media and disability are often both observed through a focus on the Western, developed and English-speaking world, different global perspectives are often overlooked. This collection explores the opportunities and challenges social media represents for the social inclusion of people with disabilities from a variety of different global perspectives that include Africa, Arabia and Asia along with European, American and Australasian perspectives and experiences.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472458452 20170313
Green Library
Book
vi, 85 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (viii, 34 p.) : col. ill.
Book
xxxxiv, 467 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: The struggle for web equality
  • Web content equality, the ADA, and participation in society
  • Web equality and the ADA
  • ADA Title III and web equality : litigation begins
  • Web equality : second-generation advocacy
  • Future web equality advocacy
  • Web content equality and cognitive disabilities
  • Web eQuality in action
  • Towards web content equality
  • eQuality pocket usability.
Never before have the civil rights of people with disabilities aligned so well with developments in information and communication technology. The center of the technology revolution is the Internet's World Wide Web, which fosters unprecedented opportunities for engagement in democratic society. The Americans with Disabilities Act likewise is helping to ensure equal participation in society by people with disabilities. Globally, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities further affirms that persons with disabilities are entitled to the full and equal enjoyment of fundamental personal freedoms. This book is about the lived struggle for disability rights, with a focus on Web equality for people with cognitive disabilities, such as intellectual disabilities, autism, and print-related disabilities. The principles derived from the right to the Web - freedom of speech and individual dignity - are bound to lead toward full and meaningful involvement in society for persons with cognitive and other disabilities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107051805 20160617
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (5 pages) : color illustrations
Book
ix, 251 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
While digital media can offer many opportunities for civic and cultural participation, this technology is not equally easy for everyone to use. Hardware, software, and cultural expectations combine to make some technologies an easier fit for some bodies than for others. A YouTube video without closed captions or a social network site that is incompatible with a screen reader can restrict the access of users who are hard of hearing or visually impaired. Often, people with disabilities require accommodation, assistive technologies, or other forms of aid to make digital media accessible-useable-for them. Restricted Access investigates digital media accessibility-the processes by which media is made usable by people with particular needs-and argues for the necessity of conceptualizing access in a way that will enable greater participation in all forms of mediated culture. Drawing on disability and cultural studies, Elizabeth Ellcessor uses an interrogatory framework based around issues of regulation, use, content, form, and experience to examine contemporary digital media. Through interviews with policy makers and accessibility professionals, popular culture and archival materials, and an ethnographic study of internet use by people with disabilities, Ellcessor reveals the assumptions that undergird contemporary technologies and participatory cultures. Restricted Access makes the crucial point that if digital media open up opportunities for individuals to create and participate, but that technology only facilitates the participation of those who are already privileged, then its progressive potential remains unrealized. Engagingly written with powerful examples, Ellcessor demonstrates the importance of alternate uses, marginalized voices, and invisible innovations in the context of disability identities to push us to rethink digital media accessibility.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781479853434 20160912
Green Library
Journal/Periodical
1 online resource
Public Law 105-220, the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, amended section 508 of The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 to include accessibility requirements for electronic and information technology to accommodate people with disabilities. Coverage on this site includes: Laws and regulations; Federal and State policies for Section 508 mandates; identification of Section 508 coordinators within Federal agencies; an Accessibility Best Practices Library; and Section 508 blog. Includes http://www.buyaccessible.gov/, a web site for Section 508 procurement assistance.
Book
xi, 345 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Standards bodies, access to information technology, and human rights / Judy Brewer
  • Accessible ICTs and the opening of political space for persons with disabilities / Janet E. Lord
  • Web accessibility for people with cognitive disabilities : a legal right? / Peter Blanck
  • Intersection of human rights, social justice, the internet, and accessibility in libraries : access, education, and inclusion / Paul T. Jaeger, Brian Wentz, and John Carlo Bertot
  • Public financing of information technology and human rights for people with disabilities / Deborah Kaplan
  • Using provincial laws to drive a national agenda : connecting human rights and disability rights laws / Ravi Malhotra and Megan A. Rusciano
  • Access to justice / Fredric I. Lederer
  • Open government and digital accessibility / Timothy Elder
  • E-books and human rights / Jim Fruchterman
  • Accessibility and online learning / Mary J. Ziegler and David Sloan
  • Who owns captioning? / Raja Kushalnagar
  • Information privacy and security as a human right for people with disabilities / Jonathan Lazar, Brian Wentz, and Marco Winckler
  • How does inaccessible gaming lead to social exclusion? / Joyram Chakraborty
  • Pivot model of policy entrepreneurship : an application of European ideas in the global South / G. Anthony Giannoumis, Mirriam Nthenge, and Jorge Manhique
  • Accessibility infrastructure and the global South / Joyojeet Pal
  • ICT access, disability human rights, and social inclusion in India / Sanjay S. Jain.
Disability, Human Rights, and Information Technology addresses the global issue of equal access to information and communications technology (ICT) by persons with disabilities. The right to access the same digital content at the same time and at the same cost as people without disabilities is implicit in several human rights instruments and is featured prominently in Articles 9 and 21 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The right to access ICT, moreover, invokes complementary civil and human rights issues: freedom of expression; freedom to information; political participation; civic engagement; inclusive education; the right to access the highest level of scientific and technological information; and participation in social and cultural opportunities. Despite the ready availability and minimal cost of technology to enable people with disabilities to access ICT on an equal footing as consumers without disabilities, prevailing practice around the globe continues to result in their exclusion. Questions and complexities may also arise where technologies advance ahead of existing laws and policies, where legal norms are established but not yet implemented, or where legal rights are defined but clear technical implementations are not yet established. At the intersection of human-computer interaction, disability rights, civil rights, human rights, international development, and public policy, the volume's contributors examine crucial yet underexplored areas, including technology access for people with cognitive impairments, public financing of information technology, accessibility and e-learning, and human rights and social inclusion. Contributors: John Bertot, Peter Blanck, Judy Brewer, Joyram Chakraborty, Tim Elder, Jim Fruchterman, G. Anthony Giannoumis, Paul Jaeger, Sanjay Jain, Deborah Kaplan, Raja Kushalnagar, Jonathan Lazar, Fredric I. Lederer, Janet E. Lord, Ravi Malhotra, Jorge Manhique, Mirriam Nthenge, Joyojeet Pal, Megan A. Rusciano, David Sloan, Michael Ashley Stein, Brian Wentz, Marco Winckler, Mary J. Ziegler.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249231 20170717
Green Library
Book
xi, 345 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction / Jonathan Lazar and Michael Ashley Stein
  • Standards bodies, access to information technology, and human rights / Judy Brewer
  • Accessible ICTs and the opening of political space for persons with disabilities / Janet E. Lord
  • Web accessibility for people with cognitive disabilities : a legal right? / Peter Blanck
  • Intersection of human rights, social justice, the internet, and accessibility in libraries : access, education, and inclusion / Paul T. Jaeger, Brian Wentz, and John Carlo Bertot
  • Public financing of information technology and human rights for people with disabilities / Deborah Kaplan
  • Using provincial laws to drive a national agenda : connecting human rights and disability rights laws / Ravi Malhotra and Megan A. Rusciano
  • Access to justice / Fredric I. Lederer
  • Open government and digital accessibility / Timothy Elder
  • E-books and human rights / Jim Fruchterman
  • Accessibility and online learning / Mary J. Ziegler and David Sloan
  • Who owns captioning? / Raja Kushalnagar
  • Information privacy and security as a human right for people with disabilities / Jonathan Lazar, Brian Wentz, and Marco Winckler
  • How does inaccessible gaming lead to social exclusion? / Joyram Chakraborty
  • Pivot model of policy entrepreneurship : an application of European ideas in the global South / G. Anthony Giannoumis, Mirriam Nthenge, and Jorge Manhique
  • Accessibility infrastructure and the global South / Joyojeet Pal
  • ICT access, disability human rights, and social inclusion in India / Sanjay S. Jain.
Disability, Human Rights, and Information Technology addresses the global issue of equal access to information and communications technology (ICT) by persons with disabilities. The right to access the same digital content at the same time and at the same cost as people without disabilities is implicit in several human rights instruments and is featured prominently in Articles 9 and 21 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The right to access ICT, moreover, invokes complementary civil and human rights issues: freedom of expression; freedom to information; political participation; civic engagement; inclusive education; the right to access the highest level of scientific and technological information; and participation in social and cultural opportunities. Despite the ready availability and minimal cost of technology to enable people with disabilities to access ICT on an equal footing as consumers without disabilities, prevailing practice around the globe continues to result in their exclusion. Questions and complexities may also arise where technologies advance ahead of existing laws and policies, where legal norms are established but not yet implemented, or where legal rights are defined but clear technical implementations are not yet established. At the intersection of human-computer interaction, disability rights, civil rights, human rights, international development, and public policy, the volume's contributors examine crucial yet underexplored areas, including technology access for people with cognitive impairments, public financing of information technology, accessibility and e-learning, and human rights and social inclusion. Contributors: John Bertot, Peter Blanck, Judy Brewer, Joyram Chakraborty, Tim Elder, Jim Fruchterman, G. Anthony Giannoumis, Paul Jaeger, Sanjay Jain, Deborah Kaplan, Raja Kushalnagar, Jonathan Lazar, Fredric I. Lederer, Janet E. Lord, Ravi Malhotra, Jorge Manhique, Mirriam Nthenge, Joyojeet Pal, Megan A. Rusciano, David Sloan, Michael Ashley Stein, Brian Wentz, Marco Winckler, Mary J. Ziegler.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249231 20170717
Law Library (Crown)

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