Book
viii, 180 pages ; 24 cm
  • The logic of promissory finance
  • The entrepreneurial ethic and the spirit of financialism
  • The ghost in the financial machine
  • The sacred market
  • Sociality, uncertainty, and ritual
  • The charismatic derivative
  • The wealth of dividuals
  • The global ambitions of finance
  • The end of the contractual promise.
In this provocative look at one of the most important events of our time, renowned scholar Arjun Appadurai argues that the economic collapse of 2008-while indeed spurred on by greed, ignorance, weak regulation, and irresponsible risk-taking-was, ultimately, a failure of language. To prove this sophisticated point, he takes us into the world of derivative finance, which has become the core of contemporary trading and the primary target of blame for the collapse and all our subsequent woes. With incisive argumentation, he analyzes this challengingly technical world, drawing on thinkers such as J. L. Austin, Marcel Mauss, and Max Weber as theoretical guides to showcase the ways language-and particular failures in it-paved the way for ruin. Appadurai moves in four steps through his analysis. In the first, he highlights the importance of derivatives in contemporary finance, isolating them as the core technical innovation that markets have produced. In the second, he shows that derivatives are essentially written contracts about the future prices of assets-they are, crucially, a promise. Drawing on Mauss's The Gift and Austin's theories on linguistic performatives, Appadurai, in his third step, shows how the derivative exploits the linguistic power of the promise through the special form that money takes in finance as the most abstract form of commodity value. Finally, he pinpoints one crucial feature of derivatives (as seen in the housing market especially): that they can make promises that other promises will be broken. He then details how this feature spread contagiously through the market, snowballing into the systemic liquidity crisis that we are all too familiar with now. With his characteristic clarity, Appadurai explains one of the most complicated-and yet absolutely central-aspects of our modern economy. He makes the critical link we have long needed to make: between the numerical force of money and the linguistic force of what we say we will do with it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226318776 20160619
Green Library
STS-186-01
Book
xi, 515 pages ; 24 cm
  • Prologue: The garden of forking paths
  • pt. 1. Disturbing the peace. The undertakers of capitalism ; The human attention exchange ; Knowing how to swim ; Abandoning the shipwreck
  • pt. 2. Pseudorandomness. Let me see your war face ; Like marriage, but without the fucking ; Speed is a feature ; D-Day ; A conclave of angels ; The hill of sand ; Turning and turning in the widening gyre ; ¡No pasarán! ; The dog shit sandwich ; Victory ; Launching! ; Dates @Twitter ; Acquisition chicken ; Getting liked ; Getting poked ; The various futures of the forking paths ; Retweets are not endorsements ; The dotted line ; Endgame
  • pt. 3. Move fast and break things. Boot camp ; Product masseur ; Google delenda est ; Leaping headlong ; One shot, one kill ; Twice bitten, thrice shy ; Ads five-oh ; The narcissism of privacy ; Are we savages or what? ; O Death ; The barbaric yawn ; Going public ; When the flying saucers fail to appear ; Monetizing the tumor ; The great awakening ; Barbarians at the gates ; IPA > IPO ; Initial public offering: a reevaluation ; Flash boys ; Full frontal Facebook ; Microsoft shrugged ; Ad majorem Facebook gloriam ; Adiós, Facebook ; Pandemonium lost
  • Epilogue: Man plans and God laughs.
"The industry provocateur behind such companies as Twitter and a nascent Facebook presents an irreverent exposé of life inside the tech bubble that traces his hedonist lifestyle against a backdrop of early social media and online marketing, sharing critical insights into how they are shaping today's world."-- NoveList.
Green Library
STS-186-01
Book
1 online resource
The rise of artificial intelligence has rekindled a long-standing debate regarding the impact of technology on employment. This is just one of many areas where exponential advances in technology signal both hope and fear, leading to public controversy. This book shows that many debates over new technologies are framed in the context of risks to moral values, human health, and environmental safety. But it argues that behind these legitimate concerns often lie deeper, but unacknowledged, socioeconomic considerations. Technological tensions are often heightened by perceptions that the benefits of new technologies will accrue only to small sections of society while the risks will be more widely distributed. Similarly, innovations that threaten to alter cultural identities tend to generate intense social concern. As such, societies that exhibit great economic and political inequities are likely to experience heightened technological controversies. Drawing from nearly 600 years of technology history, Innovation and Its Enemies identifies the tension between the need for innovation and the pressure to maintain continuity, social order, and stability as one of today's biggest policy challenges. It reveals the extent to which modern technological controversies grow out of distrust in public and private institutions. Using detailed case studies of coffee, the printing press, margarine, farm mechanization, electricity, mechanical refrigeration, recorded music, transgenic crops, and transgenic animals, it shows how new technologies emerge, take root, and create new institutional ecologies that favor their establishment in the marketplace. The book uses these lessons from history to contextualize contemporary debates surrounding technologies such as artificial intelligence, online learning, 3D printing, gene editing, robotics, and drones. It ultimately makes the case for shifting greater responsibility to public leaders to work with scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs to manage technological change, make associated institutional adjustments, and expand public engagement on scientific and technological matters.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190467036 20170206
eReserve
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Book
xii, 225 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • 1: Rethinking Capitalism: An Introduction (Michael Jacobs and Mariana Mazzucato) 2: The Failure of Austerity: Rethinking Fiscal Policy (Stephanie Kelton) 3: Understanding Money and Macroeconomic Policy (L. Randall Wray and Yeva Nersisyan) 4: The Costs of Short-termism (Andrew Haldane) 5: Innovative Enterprise and the Theory of the Firm (William Lazonick) 6: Innovation, the State and Patient Capital (Mariana Mazzucato) 7: Investment-led Growth: A Solution to the European Crisis (Stephany Griffith-Jones and Giovanni Cozzi) 8: Inequality and Economic Growth (Joseph Stiglitz) 9: The Paradoxes of Privatisation and Public Service Outsourcing (Colin Crouch) 10: Decarbonisation: Innovation and the Economics of Climate Change (Dimitri Zenghelis) 11: Capitalism, Technology and a Green Global Golden Age: The Role of History in Helping to Shape the Future (Carlota Perez).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119120957 20161003
"Thought provoking and fresh - this book challenges how we think about economics. Gillian Tett, Financial Times Watch an interview with Mariana Mazzucato at Bloomberg here and here. Download the introduction of the book here. Order the book now and receive 20% discount - simply enter promotion code SSHJB at the www.wiley.com online checkout (please click here for further information). Western capitalism is in crisis. For decades investment has been falling, living standards have stagnated or declined, and inequality has risen dramatically. Economic policy has neither reformed the financial system nor restored stable growth. Climate change meanwhile poses increasing risks to future prosperity. In this book some of the world s leading economists propose new ways of thinking about capitalism. In clear and compelling prose, each chapter shows how today s deep economic problems reflect the inadequacies of orthodox economic theory and the failure of policies informed by it. The chapters examine a range of contemporary economic issues, including fiscal and monetary policy, financial markets and business behaviour, inequality and privatisation, and innovation and environmental change. The authors set out alternative economic approaches which better explain how capitalism works, why it often doesn t, and how it can be made more innovative, inclusive and sustainable. Outlining a series of far-reaching policy reforms, Rethinking Capitalism offers a powerful challenge to mainstream economic debate, and new ideas to transform it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119120957 20161003
Green Library
STS-186-01
Book
xviii, 240 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Since its publication in 1918, Thorstein Veblen's The Higher Learning in America has remained a text that every serious student of the American university must confront. Intellectual historian Richard Teichgraeber brings us the first scholarly edition of Veblen's classic, thoroughly edited, annotated, and indexed. An extensive introduction discusses the book's composition and publishing history, Veblen's debts to earlier critics of the American university, and the place of The Higher Learning in America in current debates about the American university. Veblen's insights into the American university system at the outset of the twentieth century are as provocative today as they were when first published. Insisting that institutions of higher learning should be dedicated solely to the disinterested pursuit of knowledge, he urged American universities to abandon commitments to extraneous pursuits such as athletics, community service, and vocational education. He also believed that the corporate model of governance-with university boards of trustees dominated by well-to-do businessmen and university presidents who functioned essentially as businessmen in academic dress-mandated unsavory techniques of salesmanship and self-promotion that threatened to reduce institutions of higher learning to the status of competitive business enterprises. With a detailed chronology, suggested readings, and comprehensive notes identifying events, individuals, and institutions to which Veblen alludes, this volume is sure to become the standard teaching text for Veblen's classic work and an invaluable resource for students of both the history and the current workings of the American university.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781421416786 20160618
Green Library
STS-186-01
Book
221 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
  • Introduction
  • Part one: Fighting for Fujifilm (1. The core business vanishes ; 2. A second foundation)
  • Part two: Managing for victory (3. Managing in times of crisis ; 4. A battle that cannot be lost ; 5. Those who put the company first are those who truly grow ; 6. The way forward in a global age)
  • Conclusion.
In 2000, photographic film products made up 60% of Fujifilm's sales and up to 70% of its profit. Within ten years, digital cameras had destroyed that business. In 2012, Kodak filed for bankruptcy. Yet Fujifilm has boasted record profits and continues strong.What happened? What did Fujifilm do? What do businesses today need from their leaders? What kinds of employees can help businesses thrive in the future? Here, the CEO who brought Fujifilm back from the brink explains how he engineered transformative organizational innovation and product diversification, with observations on his management philosophy.
Green Library
STS-186-01
Database topics
General and Reference Works; Environmental Studies; Social Sciences (General); Art, Architecture and Design; Science (General); Physics and Astronomy; Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Earth Sciences; Biology; Medicine; Engineering
Physical extent
1 online resource
  • Citation Indexes
  • Science Citation Index Expanded 1900-present
  • Social Sciences Citation Index 1900-present
  • Arts & Humanities Citation Index 1975-present
  • Conference Proceedings Citation Index, Science 1990-present
  • Conference Proceedings Citation Index, Social Sciences & Humanities 1990-present
  • Book Citation Index - Science 2005-present
  • Book Citation Index - Social Sciences & Humanities 2005-present
  • Chemical Indexes
  • Current Chemical Reactions (CCR Expanded) 1985-present
  • Index Chemicus (IC) 1993-present
  • Emerging Sources Citation Index 2015-
Web of Science Core Collection provides access to the world's leading citation databases. Authoritative, multidisciplinary content covers journals worldwide, including Open Access journals and conference proceedings. Includes current and retrospective coverage in the sciences, social sciences, arts, and humanities, with coverage to 1900.
eReserve
STS-186-01
Book
xxv, 237 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • Introduction: Do something different
  • From crisis ideology to the division of innovative labour
  • Technology, innovation and growth
  • Risk-taking state : from "de-risking" to "bring it on!"
  • The US entrepreneurial state
  • The state behind the iPhone
  • Pushing vs. nudging the green industrial revolution
  • Wind and solar power : government success stories and technology in crisis
  • Risks and rewards : from rotten apples to symbiotic ecosystems
  • Socialization of risk and privitization of rewards : can the entrepreneurial state eat its cake too?
  • Conclusion.
Green Library
STS-186-01
Book
xiii, 396 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Preface-- 1. Two Worlds of Innovation-- 2. Autarkic Large Companies-- 3. Upholding the Pecking Order: Universities and their Relations with Industry-- 4. Up the Rocky Road: Venture Case Studies-- 5. IPO or Bust: Venture Financing-- 6. Amoeba Innovation: The Alternative to Ventures-- 7. Innovation Across Time and Space: Advantage New Companies.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199268801 20160528
The innovative strength of the world's two largest economies, the United States and Japan, are based on two different forms of industrial and social organization. For the United States, venture companies play a key role in technical and economic progress, while in Japan they have only a minor role. In Bridging Islands, Robert Kneller argues that without vibrant new high technology companies, Japanese industry will decline inexorably. At the same time, if the favorable yet delicate environment in America is undermined, America will face collapse of its innovative and economic strength. Japan has done much to improve its environment for high technology ventures. It has some promising new high technology companies and gradually increasing numbers of entrepreneurial scientists and managers. But they continue to swim against the current. One reason is that large, established companies dominate high technology fields and pursue an autarkic innovation strategy-relying on research in-house or in affiliated companies. Another reason is that these same large companies still have preferential access to university discoveries, largely because of government policies.Thus, high technology ventures are deprived of niches in which to grow, skilled personnel, and their natural customer base. In the field of university-industry relations, steps can still be taken to improve the environment for high technology ventures-steps that would also increase the quality of university science. The American-Japanese innovation dichotomy represents a broader dichotomy between so-called liberal and coordinated market economies. The lessons from these two countries' experiences are applicable to many industrialized countries, and to developing countries shaping their innovation systems. Bridging Islands is an integrated examination of the key role of venture companies in national technical and economic success, with important implications for academics, entrepreneurs, industry and technology managers, and policy-makers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199268801 20160528
Green Library
STS-186-01
Book
xi, 218 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. Institutional Frameworks and Silicon Valley Model-- 3. How an American Technology Cluster Emerged and Became Sustainable: San Diego Biotechnology-- 4. The New Economy in Germany: The Limits of Planned Innovation-- 5. The United Kingdom: The Right Institutions but Mixed Results-- 6. Large Firms as Drivers of Cluster Formation: Patterns of Sub-Sector Specialization within European Software-- 7. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199269525 20160528
Through the 1990s and early 2000s the strength of the United States economy has been linked to its ability to foster large numbers of small innovative technology companies, a few of which have grown to dominate new industries, such as Microsoft, Genentech, or Google. US technology clusters such as Silicon Valley have become tremendous engines of innovation and wealth creation, and the envy of governments around the world. Creating Silicon Valley in Europe examines trajectories by which new technology industries emerge and become sustainable across different types of economies. Governments around the world have poured vast sums of money into policies designed to foster clusters of similar start-up firms in their economies. This book employs careful empirical studies of the biotechnology and software industries in the United States and several European economies, to examine the relative success of policies aimed at cultivating the 'Silicon Valley model' of organizing and financing companies in Europe.Influential research associated with the 'varieties of capitalism' literature has argued that countries with liberal market orientations, such as the United States and the United Kingdom, can more easily design policies to cultivate success in new technology industries compared to countries associated with organized economies, such as Germany and Sweden. The book's empirical findings support the view that national institutional factors strongly condition the success of new technology policies. However, the study also identifies important cases in which radically innovative new technology firms have thrived within organized economies. Through examining case of both success and failure Creating Silicon Valley in Europe helps identify constellations of market and governmental activities that can lead to the emergence of sustainable clusters of new technology firms across both organized and liberal market economies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199269525 20160528
Green Library
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Book
x, 393 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
In Making Silicon Valley, Christophe Lecuyer shows that the explosive growth of the personal computer industry in Silicon Valley was the culmination of decades of growth and innovation in the San Francisco-area electronics industry. Using the tools of science and technology studies, he explores the formation of Silicon Valley as an industrial district, from its beginnings as the home of a few radio enterprises that operated in the shadow of RCA and other East Coast firms through its establishment as a center of the electronics industry and a leading producer of power grid tubes, microwave tubes, and semiconductors. He traces the emergence of the innovative practices that made this growth possible by following key groups of engineers and entrepreneurs. He examines the forces outside Silicon Valley that shaped the industry -- in particular the effect of military patronage and procurement on the growth of the industry and on the development of technologies -- and considers the influence of Stanford University and other local institutions of higher learning.Lecuyer argues that Silicon Valley's emergence and its growth were made possible by the development of unique competencies in manufacturing, in product engineering, and in management. Entrepreneurs learned to integrate invention, design, manufacturing, and sales logistics, and they developed incentives to attract and retain a skilled and motivated workforce. The largest Silicon Valley firms -- including Eitel-McCullough (Eimac), Litton Industries, Varian Associates, Fairchild Semiconductor, and Intel -- dominated the American markets for advanced tubes and semiconductors and, because of their innovations in manufacturing, design, and management, served as models and incubators for other electronics ventures in the area.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262122818 20160605
Green Library
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Book
x, 393 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Defiant West
  • 2. Diversification
  • 3. Military cooperative
  • 4. Revolution in silicon
  • 5. Opening up new markets
  • 6. Miniaturization
  • 7. Valley of silicon.
In Making Silicon Valley, Christophe Lecuyer shows that the explosive growth of the personal computer industry in Silicon Valley was the culmination of decades of growth and innovation in the San Francisco-area electronics industry. Using the tools of science and technology studies, he explores the formation of Silicon Valley as an industrial district, from its beginnings as the home of a few radio enterprises that operated in the shadow of RCA and other East Coast firms through its establishment as a center of the electronics industry and a leading producer of power grid tubes, microwave tubes, and semiconductors. He traces the emergence of the innovative practices that made this growth possible by following key groups of engineers and entrepreneurs. He examines the forces outside Silicon Valley that shaped the industry -- in particular the effect of military patronage and procurement on the growth of the industry and on the development of technologies -- and considers the influence of Stanford University and other local institutions of higher learning.Lecuyer argues that Silicon Valley's emergence and its growth were made possible by the development of unique competencies in manufacturing, in product engineering, and in management. Entrepreneurs learned to integrate invention, design, manufacturing, and sales logistics, and they developed incentives to attract and retain a skilled and motivated workforce. The largest Silicon Valley firms -- including Eitel-McCullough (Eimac), Litton Industries, Varian Associates, Fairchild Semiconductor, and Intel -- dominated the American markets for advanced tubes and semiconductors and, because of their innovations in manufacturing, design, and management, served as models and incubators for other electronics ventures in the area.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262122818 20160605
Green Library
STS-186-01
Book
424 p. ; 22 cm.
Like the Greeks who sailed with Jason in search of the Golden Fleece, the new Argonauts - foreign-born, technically skilled entrepreneurs who travel back and forth between Silicon Valley and their home countries - seek their fortune in distant lands by launching companies far from established centres of skill and technology. Their story illuminates profound transformations in the global economy. Economic geographer AnnaLee Saxenian has followed this transformation, exploring one of its great paradoxes: how the 'brain drain' has become 'brain circulation, ' a powerful economic force for development of formerly peripheral regions. The new Argonauts - armed with Silicon Valley experience and relationships and the ability to operate in two countries simultaneously - quickly identify market opportunities, locate foreign partners, and manage cross-border business operations. "The New Argonauts" extends Saxenian's pioneering research into the dynamics of competition in Silicon Valley. The book brings a fresh perspective to the way that technology entrepreneurs build regional advantage in order to compete in global markets. Scholars, policymakers and business leaders will benefit from Saxenian's first-hand research into the investors and entrepreneurs who return home to start new companies while remaining tied to powerful economic and professional communities in the United States. For Americans accustomed to unchallenged economic domination, the fast-growing capabilities of China and India may seem threatening. But as Saxenian convincingly displays in this path breaking book, the Argonauts have made America richer, not poorer.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674022010 20160527
Tells the story of the foreign-born, technically skilled investors and entrepreneurs who return home to start new companies while remaining tied to powerful economic and professional communities in the United States.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674025660 20160527
Green Library
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Book
xiii, 298 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • List of Illustrations and Tables ix Acknowledgments xi Introduction Discovering the City of Knowledge 1 PART ONE: INTENT 1. Cold War Politics 17 Frameworks, 1945-1950 18 Policy and Geography, 1950-1965 36 Conclusion 55 2. "Multiversities, " Cities, and Suburbs 58 The Scientist in the Garden 60 Economic Development Solutions 75 Conclusion 92 PART TWO: IMPLEMENTATION 3. From the Farm to the Valley: Stanford University and the San Francisco Peninsula 97 A Western Retreat 99 Hot and Cold Wars 103 Land Development 110 A Model City 127 "The Battle of the Hills" 132 Conclusion 139 4. Building" Brainsville" : The University of Pennsylvania and Philadelphia 142 Franklin's University and Its City 143 From Computers to Medicine 146 Industrial Decline and Urban Renewal 151 Building University City 158 Scientific Industry Comes to West Philadelphia 166 Controversy and Protest 172 Conclusion 180 5. Selling the New South: Georgia Tech and Atlanta 182 The New Industrial South 185 Postwar Growth and Postwar Power 190 Expansion and Entrepreneurship at Georgia Tech 201 Selling Atlanta in the Space Age 207 Research Parks, Office Parks, and Another Stanford? 216 Conclusion 221 PART THREE LEGACY Conclusion The Next Silicon Valley 225 Notes 235 Index 291.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691117164 20160528
What is the magic formula for turning a place into a high-tech capital? How can a city or region become a high-tech powerhouse like Silicon Valley? For over half a century, through boom times and bust, business leaders and politicians have tried to become 'the next Silicon Valley, ' but few have succeeded. This book examines why high-tech development became so economically important late in the twentieth century, and why its magic formula of people, jobs, capital, and institutions has been so difficult to replicate. Margaret O'Mara shows that high-tech regions are not simply accidental market creations but 'cities of knowledge' - planned communities of scientific production that were shaped and subsidized by the original venture capitalist, the Cold War defense complex.At the heart of the story is the American research university, an institution enriched by Cold War spending and actively engaged in economic development. The story of the city of knowledge broadens our understanding of postwar urban history and of the relationship between civil society and the state in late twentieth-century America. It leads us to further redefine the American suburb as being much more than formless 'sprawl, ' and shows how it is in fact the ultimate post-industrial city. Understanding this history and geography is essential to planning for the future of the high-tech economy, and this book is must reading for anyone interested in building the next Silicon Valley.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691117164 20160528
Green Library, Special Collections
STS-186-01
Book
xviii, 204 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm.
Despite the international market downturn technology based companies still lead world industry. Despite the dotcom crash Silicon Valley boasts more millionaires than anywhere on the planet. Cloning Silicon Valley locates those businesses and locations which will lead the next generation of technological advancement and business innovation. Technology underpins all post-industrial economies - which is why virtually every developed country in the world today, and not a few under-developed ones, aspires to build its own high tech industry using California's Silicon Valley as its model. But creating a technology economy - one where indigenous entrepreneurs and companies are developing, producing and marketing their own products - is a difficult and delicate undertaking. High tech is less an industry than a culture, and one that thrives in concentrations where venture capital, entrepreneurs and talented personnel can work closely together. This book explores the creation of successful concentrations of high-tech industry. Is the California model something that can be copied successfully? Who has succeeded and why? Could the high tech industry thrive if dispersed?These questions are answered by exploring the roles of government, management, the educational system, and the capital markets. The book also addresses the more amorphous but critical cultural imperatives that produce the fast-moving, entrepreneurial culture in which high tech thrives. At the centre of the book are profiles of six Silicon Valley imitators. David Rosenberg describes the approaches to building a technology industry, and details the opinions and evaluations of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, government officials and academics who have experienced the phenomenon in their home countries and in California.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781903684061 20160527
Green Library
STS-186-01
Book
xiv, 281 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgements. Introduction: The Hidden Lessons of "Siliconia". SILICON VALLEY. Introduction. From Semi desert to Silicon Valley. Valley Dynamism. Valley Innovators. Post silicon Silicon Valley. EUROPE S SILICON FEN. Introduction. The Phenomenon of Cambridge. Cambridge Dynamics. Phenomenally Innovative. The Future of the Phenomenon. Epilogue: A Silicon World? Endnotes. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780471496045 20160528
"An innovative book for an innovative topic." Charles Hampden-Turner Like the subject matter it covers, Clusters of Creativity is innovative and original. It breaks with popular interpretations of Silicon Valley and similar regions, which range from the hyperbolically laudatory to the contemptuously dismissive, and takes a critical, objective look at the lessons that these locations provide about innovation and entrepreneurship. Readable, yet rigorous in its analyses, the book provides a practical and balanced set of perspectives on how the powers of business creativity are fostered and sustained. It focuses not so much on the generations of high technologies but on the motivations and strategies of business leaders who turn revolutionary innovations into commercial realities. Clusters of Creativity demystifies the many enigmas that surround two leading capitals of the modern global economy, providing insights on managing innovation and entrepreneurship that are both eye-opening and broadly applicable to all organizations and industries. Clusters of Creativity will challenge assumptions, dispel myths, enlighten, inspire, and generally provoke thought. In an age where technology and hyperbole frequently go hand-in-hand, the book's well-founded insights are all the more refreshing and important.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780471496045 20160528
Green Library
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Book
ix, 173 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: MIT and the Rise of the Entrepreneurial University 1. The Second Academic Revolution 2. MIT: the Founding of an Entrepreneurial University 3. Controversy Over Consultation 4. The Traffic Among MIT, Industry and the Military 5. Knowledge as Property: the Debate Over Patenting Academic Science 6. The Regulation of Academic Patenting 7. Enterprises from Science: the Origin of Science-Based Regional Economic Development 8. The Invention of the Venture Capital Firm: American Research and Development 9. Stanford and Silicon Valley: Enhancement of the MIT Model 10. Technology Transfer Universalized: the Bayh-Dole Regime 11. The Making of the Entrepreneurial Scientists 12. Innovation: the Endless Transition.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415285162 20160527
MIT and the Rise of Entrepreneurial Science is a timely and authoritative book that analyses the transformation of the university's role in society as an expanded one involving economic and social development as well as teaching and research. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology invented the format for university-industry relations that has been copied all over America and latterly the rest of the world. This excellent book shows that the ground-breaking university-industry-government interactions have become one of the foundations of modern successful economies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415285162 20160527
Green Library
STS-186-01
Database topics
News
Access World News from NewsBank provides full-text information and perspectives from over 600 U.S. and over 700 international sources, each with its own distinctive focus offering diverse viewpoints on local, regional and world issues. Date coverage varies with individual newspaper. Also includes thousands of broadcast transcripts, newswires, video clips, and news blogs
eReserve
STS-186-01
Book
xvi, 351 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of figures-- List of tables-- List of disk drive related abbreviations-- Acknowledgments-- Part I. Introduction: 1. Why location matters-- 2. Industry background: technology, competition, and geographic reach-- Part II. Location and Competitive Advantage: 3. A theory of industry evolution, location, and competitive advantage-- 4. Alternative explanations for industry advangage-- 5. Global shift and competitiveness in hard disk drives-- 6. Leveraging locations: American industry and its southeast Asian production system-- Part III. Case Studies: 7. Singapore With Poh Kam Wong-- 8. Thailand-- 9. Malaysia-- Part IV. Implications: 10. Policy, politics, and location in developing countries-- 11. Globalization and industrial leadership-- Appendixes-- Notes-- References-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804741835 20160528
Momentous developments in the global economy over the last two decades have dramatically increased the availability of industrial investment sites and lowered the cost of relocating core activities to new countries. But how should these developments be exploited for competitive advantage? Firms face competing pressures: scale economies and the advantages of proximity push them to concentrate activities in one or only a few locations, while low wages and new markets invite dispersal across several countries. This book examines how location decisions have contributed to the global dominance of U.S. firms in the hard disk drive industry. In analyzing the industry since its beginnings some forty years ago, the book explains how American leadership in disk drives has rested on the formation of two complementary industrial clusters. Fundamental research and product development has been located almost entirely in the United States, principally California. Manufacturing has been concentrated in Southeast Asia (initially in Singapore and later in Thailand and Malaysia as well). This duality has proven key to the successful competitive position of the U.S. disk drive industry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804741835 20160528
Green Library
STS-186-01
Book
424 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. The Silicon Valley habitat Chong-Moon Lee, William F. Miller, Marguerite Gong Hancock and Henry S. Rowen-- 2. Mysteries of the region: knowledge dynamics in Silicon Valley John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid-- Part I. Silicon Valley Today: 3. A profile of the Valley's evolving structure Doug Henton-- 4. Life in Silicon Valley: a first-hand view of the region's growth E. Floyd Kvamme-- 5. Innovation in business models T. Michael Nevens-- 6. Four styles of Valley entrepreneurship Chong-Moon Lee-- 7. Changing everything: the Internet revolution and Silicon valley Steve Jurvetson-- Part II. The Evolution of Silicon Valley: 8. Fairchild semiconductor and its influence Christopher Lecuyer-- 9. Serendipity or strategy: how technology and markets came to favor Silicon Valley Henry S. Rowen-- 10. The role of Stanford University: a Dean's reflections James Gibbons-- 11. Social networks in Silicon Valley' Emilio J. Castilla, Hokyu Hwang, Ellen Granovetter and Mark Granovetter-- 12. Networks of immigrant entrepreneurs Annalee Saxeninan-- Part III. A Clustered Community: 13. Venture capitalists: the coaches of Silicon Valley Thomas F. Hellmann-- 14. The valley of deals: how venture capital helped shape the region P. Banatao and Kevin A. Fong-- 15. Fueling the revolution: commercial bank financing John C. Dean-- 16. Advising the new economy: the role of lawyers Craig W. Johnson-- 17. Shepherding the faithful: the influence of executive search firms Thomas J. Friel-- 18. Guiding the innovators: why accountants are valued James D. Atwell-- 19. Free advice: consulting the Silicon Valley way Regis McKenna-- Afterword: sustaining the edge Chong-Moon Lee, William F. Miller, Marguerite Gong Hancock and Henry S. Rowen-- Notes-- References-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804740623 20160527
The enormous and sustained success of Silicon Valley has excited interest around the globe. Startup companies the world over are attempting to emulate its high tech businesses, and many governments are changing their institutions in order to foster Silicon Valleys of their own. What accounts for the Valley's leading edge in innovation and entrepreneurship? This book gives an answer by insiders, by prominent business leaders and academics from the heart of the Valley. They argue that what distinguishes the Valley is not its scientific advances or technological breakthroughs. Instead, its edge derives from a habitat or environment that is tuned to turn ideas into products and take them rapidly to market by creating new firms.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804740623 20160527
The enormous and sustained success of Silicon Valley has excited interest around the globe. Startup companies the world over are attempting to emulate its high tech businesses, and many governments are changing their institutions in order to foster Silicon Valleys of their own. What accounts for the Valley's leading edge in innovation and entrepreneurship? This book gives an answer by insiders, by prominent business leaders and academics from the heart of the Valley. They argue that what distinguishes the Valley is not its scientific advances or technological breakthroughs. Instead, its edge derives from a "habitat" or environment that is tuned to turn ideas into products and take them rapidly to market by creating new firms. This habitat includes supportive government regulations for new firm formation, leading research universities that interact with industry, an exceptionally talented and highly mobile work force, and experienced support services in such areas as finance, law, accounting, headhunting, and marketing, all specializing in helping new companies form and grow. Not least is a spirit of adventure and a willingness to take risks. The elements of this habitat are packed into a small geographic area. In it, networks of specialists form communities of practice within which ideas develop and circulate and from which new products and new firms emerge. Feedback processes are strongly at work: the successes of Valley firms strengthen the habitat, and the stronger it becomes, the more new, successful firms are created. Among industries, electronics came into the Valley first, followed by semiconductors, computers, software, and, in the 1990s, biotechnology, networking, and the Internet. This extraordinary ability to keep adding new industrial sectors itself affects the prospect for the Silicon Valley's future. What lies ahead? From within, the Valley faces serious challenges in defining a new generation of entrepreneurs, addressing a growing digital divide, and maintaining quality of life. At the same time, the Valley must redefine its global role with respect to other rising innovative regions worldwide. Nevertheless, the proven ability of its highly effective habitat suggests that in both innovation and entrepreneurship, Silicon Valley will maintain its edge.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804740630 20160610
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