Book
xii, 472 pages, 22 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
  • Part 1. Contexts
  • Militarizing time: waves of war
  • Militarizing minds: new ideas of army and nation
  • Militarizing places and persons: academies and cadets
  • Part 2. Academy culture and practice
  • Politics and status: special favor
  • Politics and power: a singular duty
  • State and society: revolution, reform, control
  • Tactics and spirit: certain victory
  • Order and discipline: joyful submission.
For South Koreans, the twenty years from the early 1960s to late 1970s were the best and worst of times a period of unprecedented economic growth and of political oppression that deepened as prosperity spread. In this masterly account, Carter J. Eckert finds the roots of South Korea s dramatic socioeconomic transformation in the country s long history of militarization a history personified in South Korea s paramount leader, Park Chung Hee.The first volume of a comprehensive two-part history, Park Chung Hee and Modern Korea: The Roots of Militarism, 1866 1945 reveals how the foundations of the dynamic but strongly authoritarian Korean state that emerged under Park were laid during the period of Japanese occupation. As a cadet in the Manchurian Military Academy, Park and his fellow officers absorbed the Imperial Japanese Army s ethos of victory at all costs and absolute obedience to authority. Japanese military culture decisively shaped Korea s postwar generation of military leaders. When Park seized power in an army coup in 1961, he brought this training and mentality to bear on the project of Korean modernization.Korean society under Park exuded a distinctively martial character, Eckert shows. Its hallmarks included the belief that the army should intervene in politics in times of crisis; that a central authority should plan and monitor the country s economic system; that the Korean people s can do spirit would allow them to overcome any challenge; and that the state should maintain a strong disciplinary presence in society, reserving the right to use violence to maintain order.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674659865 20161228
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xv, 246 pages ; 23 cm
  • 1. Introduction: South Korea's Anti-American Eruption 2. The Catalyst: Revisiting the Nogun-ri Massacre 3. Poisoning the Relationship: Agent Orange and Formaldehyde 4. Fairness and Equality: Maehyang-ri and SOFA Revision 5. Bushwhacked: North Korea Policy 6. Not Sporting: The Short-Track RacingIncident 7. Climax: The Highway 56 Tragedy 8. Conclusion: Lessons for Americans and Koreans.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781931368384 20160619
Although most South Koreans profess to hold favorable views of the United States, the phenomenon of anti-Americanism in this "pro-American" country is well known. David Straub, who served as the head of the political section at the U.S. embassy in Seoul for three years, analyzes the arc of increasing anti-American sentiment from 1999 that climaxed in 2002 in massive demonstrations over the accidental killing of two schoolgirls by a vehicle driven by American soldiers. Straub argues - using case studies of major incidents during the period - that anti-Americanism was not simply a reaction to U.S. actions, but was powerfully embedded in a longstanding Korean national narrative of victimization at the hands of great powers, magnified by the election of a left-national government and media dynamics in the Internet age.Contents: Introduction: South Korea's Anti-American Eruption; The Catalyst: Revisiting the Nogun-ri Massacre; Poisoning the Relationship: Agent Orange and Formaldehyde; Fairness and Equality: Maehyang-ri and SOFA Revision; Bushwhacked: North Korea Policy; Not Sporting: The Short-Track Racing Incident; Climax: The Highway 56 Tragedy; and Conclusion: Lessons for Americans and Koreans.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781931368384 20160619
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
202 pages.
  • Toward a new model of engaging skilled foreigners
  • Foreign students in Korea
  • Korean students overseas
  • The Korean diaspora
  • Expatriate Indians and Korean engineering
  • Toward a global Korea.
"Global Talent" seeks to examine the utility of skilled foreigners beyond their human capital value by focusing on their social capital potential, especially their role as transnational bridges between host and home countries. Gi-Wook Shin and Joon Nak Choi build on an emerging stream of research that conceptualizes global labor mobility as a positive-sum game in which countries and businesses benefit from building ties across geographic space, rather than the zero-sum game implied by the "global war for talent" and "brain drain" metaphors. The book empirically demonstrates its thesis by examination of the case of Korea: a state archetypical of those that have been embracing economic globalization while facing a demographic crisis--and one where the dominant narrative on the recruitment of skilled foreigners is largely negative. It reveals the unique benefits that foreign students and professionals can provide to Korea, by enhancing Korean firms' competitiveness in the global marketplace and by generating new jobs for Korean citizens rather than taking them away. As this research and its key findings are relevant to other advanced societies that seek to utilize skilled foreigners for economic development, the arguments made in this book offer insights that extend well beyond the Korean experience.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804794336 20160618
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xvii, 291 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction : protest dialectics and South Korea's democracy movement
  • The making of the authoritarian state
  • Consolidating authoritarianism
  • The rise and fall of the student movement
  • The emergence of Christian activism
  • The politicization of journalists and lawyers
  • Tactical adaptation and the rise of human rights
  • Repression and the formation of alliances
  • Conclusion : the legacy of the 1970s democracy movement.
1970s South Korea is characterized by many as the "dark age for democracy." Most scholarship on South Korea's democracy movement and civil society has focused on the "student revolution" in 1960 and the large protest cycles in the 1980s which were followed by Korea's transition to democracy in 1987. But in his groundbreaking work of political and social history of 1970s South Korea, Paul Chang highlights the importance of understanding the emergence and evolution of the democracy movement in this oft-ignored decade. "Protest Dialectics" journeys back to 1970s South Korea and provides readers with an in-depth understanding of the numerous events in the 1970s that laid the groundwork for the 1980s democracy movement and the formation of civil society today. Chang shows how the narrative of the 1970s as democracy's "dark age" obfuscates the important material and discursive developments that became the foundations for the movement in the 1980s which, in turn, paved the way for the institutionalization of civil society after transition in 1987. To correct for these oversights in the literature and to better understand the origins of South Korea's vibrant social movement sector this book presents a comprehensive analysis of the emergence and evolution of the democracy movement in the 1970s.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804791465 20160618
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xxii, 383 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Korea and Taiwan : new challenges for maturing democracies / Larry Diamond and Gi-Wook Shin
  • Trends in attitudes toward democracy in Korea and Taiwan / Chong-Min Park and Yun-han Chu
  • The party system in Korea and identity politics / Jiyoon Kim
  • Political parties and identity politics in Taiwan / Shelley Rigger
  • Digital media and the transformation of politics in Korea / Minjeong Kim and Han Woo Park
  • Digital media and the transformation of politics in Taiwan / Chen-dong Tso
  • Global ascendance, domestic fracture : Korea's economic transformation since 1997 / Yoonkyung Lee
  • Challenges for the maturing Taiwan economy / Wan-wen Chu
  • Democratization and health care : the case of Korea in financing and equity / Sangho Moon
  • The aging society and social policy in Taiwan / Wan-I Lin
  • Influencing South Korea's democracy : China, North Korea, and defectors / Katharine H.S. Moon
  • China's rise and other global trends : implications for Taiwan democracy / Richard Bush.
New Challenges for Maturing Democracies in Korea and Taiwan takes a creative and comparative view of the new challenges and dynamics confronting these maturing democracies. Numerous works deal with political change in the two societies individually, but few adopt a comparative approach - and most focus mainly on the emergence of democracy or the politics of the democratization processes. This book, utilizing a broad, interdisciplinary approach, pays careful attention to post-democratization phenomena and the key issues that arise in maturing democracies. What emerges is a picture of two evolving democracies, now secure, but still imperfect and at times disappointing to their citizens - a common feature and challenge of democratic maturation. The book demonstrates that it will fall to the elected political leaders of these two countries to rise above narrow and immediate party interests to mobilize consensus and craft policies that will guide the structural adaptation and reinvigoration of the society and economy in an era that clearly presents for both countries not only steep challenges but also new opportunities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804789189 20160612
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xv, 283 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
  • INTRODUCTION -- Part 1. THE SOCIETY KIM IL SUNG BUILT AND HOW HE DID IT -- Part 2: TWO DECADES OF CRISIS -- Part 3. THE LOGIC OF SURVIVAL (DOMESTICALLY) -- Part 4. THE SURVIVAL DIPLOMACY -- Part 5. WHAT TO DO ABOUT THE NORTH? -- Part 6. BEING READY FOR WHAT WE WISH FOR -- CONCLUSION.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199964291 20160611
Andrei Lankov has gone where few outsiders have ever been. A native of the former Soviet Union, he lived as an exchange student in North Korea in the 1980s. He has studied it for his entire career, using his fluency in Korean and personal contacts to build a rich, nuanced understanding. In The Real North Korea, Lankov substitutes cold, clear analysis for the overheated rhetoric surrounding this opaque police state. After providing an accessible history of the nation, he turns his focus to what North Korea is, what its leadership thinks, and how its people cope with living in such an oppressive and poor place. He argues that North Korea is not irrational, and nothing shows this better than its continuing survival against all odds. A living political fossil, it clings to existence in the face of limited resources and a zombie economy, manipulating great powers despite its weakness. Its leaders are not ideological zealots or madmen, but perhaps the best practitioners of Machiavellian politics that can be found in the modern world. Even though they preside over a failed state, they have successfully used diplomacy-including nuclear threats-to extract support from other nations. But while the people in charge have been ruthless and successful in holding on to power, Lankov goes on to argue that this cannot continue forever, since the old system is slowly falling apart. In the long run, with or without reform, the regime is unsustainable. Lankov contends that reforms, if attempted, will trigger a dramatic implosion of the regime. They will not prolong its existence. Based on vast expertise, this book reveals how average North Koreans live, how their leaders rule, and how both survive.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199964291 20160611
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xxx, 256 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
  • Life in the DPRK
  • Foreigners in the DPRK
  • The nature of the DPRK regime
  • Dealing with the DPRK.
Coverage of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) all too often focuses solely on nuclear proliferation, military parades, and the personality cult of its leaders. As the British ambassador to North Korea, John Everard had the rare experience of living there from 2006, when the DPRK conducted its first nuclear test, to 2008. While stationed in Pyongyang, Everard's travels around the nation provided him with numerous opportunities to meet and converse with North Koreans. Only Beautiful, Please goes beyond official North Korea to unveil the human dimension of life in that hermetic nation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781931368254 20160610
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xix, 415 p. : ill., map ; 23 cm
  • Pt. I. Inter-Korean summit, 2000
  • pt. II. The search for new inter-Korean relations, 1989-1993
  • pt. III. Sunshine Policy
  • pt. IV. Unfinished mission
  • Appendix : essential documents.
More than two decades after the Cold War ended elsewhere, it continues undiminished on the Korean Peninsula. The division of the Korean nation into competing North and South Korean states and the destructive war that followed constitute one of the great, and still unresolved, tragedies of the 20th century. Peacemaker is the memoir of Lim Dong-won, former South Korean unification minister and architect of Nobel Peace Prize winner Kim Dae-Jung's sunshine policy toward North Korea.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781931368278 20160612
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
281 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
Why should Americans worry about South Korean security? The answer is clear: North Korea, and beyond. Most international attention to the North Korea problem has focused on U.S. policy, but South Korea's longterm role may in fact be more important. South Korea's security is vital to peace and stability, not only in Northeast Asia but also the wider world. Written by eminent scholars, practitioners, and policymakers with extensive on-the-ground experience, Beyond North Korea assesses the varied contexts --regional and global, traditional and nontraditional --that underpin South Korea's varied security challenges. What are South Korea's military requirements? How do relations with its neighbors enhance or undermine its position? What economic, environmental, and demographic factors come into play? This book reveals that South Korea's national security rests as much on sound domestic policy choices as on successful interstate relations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781931368193 20160606
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xv, 294 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • I. Introduction: History Textbooks, Divided Memories, and Reconciliation, Gi-Wook Shin II. Comparative Excerpts from Textbooks of China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and the United States on Eight Historical Issues III. Textbooks and History: Comparative Analysis 1. War Stories, Peter Duus 2. Japanese History Textbooks in Comparative Perspective, Haruo Tohmatsu 3. International Wars in Chinese Secondary School History Textbooks, 1931-1951, Li Weike 4. Colonial Korea and the Asia-Pacific War: A Comparative Analysis of Textbooks in South Korea and Japan, Chung JaeJeong 5. One Colonialism, Two Memories: Representing Japanese Colonialism in Taiwan and South Korea, Hsin-Huang Michael Hsiao IV. Textbooks and International Relations 6. Writing History Textbooks in Japan, Hitoshi Mitani 7. Toward Pluralism? Reforming History Curricula and Textbooks in China, Taiwan, and South Korea, Alisa Jones 8. A History That Opens to the Future: The First Common China-Japan-Korea History Teaching Guide, Soon-Won Park 9. The War over Words: History Textbooks and International Relations in Northeast Asia, Daniel C. Sneider 10. Europe's Troubled World War II Memories: Are They That Different? Daniel Chirot.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415603034 20160605
Over the past fifteen years Northeast Asia has witnessed growing intraregional exchanges and interactions, especially in the realms of culture and economy. Still, the region cannot escape from the burden of history. This book examines the formation of historical memory in four Northeast Asian societies (China, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan) and the United States focusing on the period from the beginning of the Sino-Japanese war in 1931 until the formal conclusion of the Pacific War with the San Francisco Peace Treaty of 1951. The contributors analyse the recent efforts of Korean, Japanese, and Chinese scholars to write a 'common history' of Northeast Asia and question the underlying motivations for their efforts and subsequent achievements. In doing so, they contend that the greatest obstacle to reconciliation in Northeast Asia lies in the existence of divided, and often conflicting, historical memories. The book argues that a more fruitful approach lies in understanding how historical memory has evolved in each country and been incorporated into respective master narratives. Through uncovering the existence of different master narratives, it is hoped, citizens will develop a more self-critical, self-reflective approach to their own history and that such an introspective effort has the potential to lay the foundation for greater self- and mutual understanding and eventual historical reconciliation in the region. This book will be essential reading for students and scholars of Asian history, Asian education and international relations in East Asia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415603034 20160605
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xiii, 305 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • INTRODUCTION 1: Democratization and the Evolution of Social Movements in Korea: Institutionalization and Diffusion, Paul Y. Chang and Gi-Wook Shin PART I: SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION 2: The Korean Democracy Movement: an Empirical Overview, Gi-Wook Shin, Paul Y. Chang, Jung-eun Lee and Sookyung Kim 3: From Minjung to the Simin: The Discursive Shift in Korean Social Movements, Namhee Lee 4: Exorcizing the Ghosts of Kwangju: Policing Protest in the Post-Authoritarian Era, Jong Bum Kwon PART II: INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS 5: Origins of the National Human Rights Commission of Korea: Global and Domestic Causes, Jeong-Woo Koo 6: From the Streets to the Courts: PSPD's Legal Strategy and the Institutionalization of Social Movements, Joon Seok Hong 7: The Entry of Past Activists into the National Assembly and South Korea's Participation in the Iraq War, Sookyung Kim and Paul Y. Chang 8: The Consequences of Government Funding for Environmental NGOs in South Korea, Chang Bum Ju 9: The Institutionalization of the Women's Movement and Gender Legislation, Chan S. Suh, Eun Sil Oh and Yoon S. Choi PART III: SPIN OFF MOVEMENTS AND DIFFUSION PROCESSES 10: Citizen Journalism: The Transformation of the Democratic Media Movement, Thomas Kern and Sang-hui Nam 11: New Activist Cultural Production: Independent Filmmakers, the Post-Authoritarian State, and New Capital Flows in South Korea, Young-a Park 12: The Korean Gay and Lesbian Movement 1993-2008: From "Identity" and "Community" to "Human Rights", Hyun-young Kwon Kim and John (Song Pae) Cho 13: Lawyers for a Democratic Society (Minbyun): The Evolution of Its Legal Mobilization Process Since 1988, Patricia Goedde 14: Left Out: People's Solidarity for Social Progress and the Evolution of Minjung After Authoritarianism, Alice S. Kim APPENDIX: The Stanford Korea Democracy Project.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415619974 20160606
This book explores the evolution of social movements in South Korea by focusing on how they have become institutionalized and diffused in the democratic period. The contributors explore the transformation of Korean social movements from the democracy campaigns of the 1970s and 1980s to the rise of civil society struggles after 1987. South Korea was ruled by successive authoritarian regimes from 1948 to 1987 when the government decided to re-establish direct presidential elections. The book contends that the transition to a democratic government was motivated, in part, by the pressure from social movement groups that fought the state to bring about such democracy. After the transition, however, the movement groups found themselves in a qualitatively different political context which in turn galvanized the evolution of the social movement sector. Including an impressive array of case studies ranging from the women's movement, to environmental NGOs, and from cultural production to law, the contributors to this book enrich our understanding of the democratization process in Korea, and show that the social movement sector remains an important player in Korean politics today. This book will appeal to students and scholars of Korean studies, Asian politics, political history and social movements.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415619974 20160606
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
200 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xi, 241 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction. China's Shift to a Two-Koreas Policy. The Transformation of China - South Korea Economic Relations. Emerging Political Challenges in the Sino - South Korean Relationship. China's Evolving Economic and Political Relations with North Korea. China's Strategic Policy Dilemmas and the Future of North Korea. The China - South Korea - US Security Triangle. The Korean Peninsula and Sino-Japanese Rivalry. The New Sino-Korean Economic Relationship: Implications for Northeast Asian Security.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781588266224 20160528
With China now South Korea's number one trading partner and destination for foreign investment and tourism, what are the implications for politics and security in East Asia?Scott Snyder explores the transformation of the Sino - South Korean relationship since the early 1990s. Snyder considers the strategic significance of recent developments in China's relationship with both North and South Korea and also assesses the likely consequences of those developments for US and Japanese influence in the region. His meticulous study lends important context to critical debates regarding China's foreign policy, Northeast Asian security, and international relations more broadly.This title examines China's redefined political and economic relations with North and South Korea, as well as what this implies for US and Japanese influence in Northeast Asia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781588266224 20160528
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xviii, 278 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Korea in the Process of Globalization Chang Yun-Shik PART I Status Politics Introductory Notes Donald Baker 1 Globalization and Women in South Korea Sung-Nam Cho 2 Regionalism in Korea: Regional Origins of Imbalance in the Leadership Structure of South Korea Eui-Young Yu PART II. Class Politics Introductory Notes Donald Baker 3 Industrial Workers, Corporate Employers and the Government Chang Yun-Shik, 4 Globalization of Labour and Corporate Enterprises in South Korea: Labour Relations and Social Adjustment of Migrant Workers Hyun-ho Seok 5 Stumbling Democracy in South Korea: The Impacts of Globalization and Restructuring Hyun-Chin Lim PART III. Politics of Faiths, Ideology, and Values Introductory Notes Donald Baker 6 Left and Right in South Korea Chang Yun-Shik 7 Globalization and Value Conflict in Contemporary Korea Jonghoe Yang, 8 Tradition Modernized : Globalization and Korea's New Religions Donald Baker PART IV Societal Cohesion Introductory Notes Donald Baker 9 Globalization and Welfare Reform in South Korea: Performance and Limitations Byung Yung Ahn The Paradox of Korean Globalization? Shin Gi-Wook and Joon Nak Choi.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415458795 20160527
"Korea Confronts Globalization" looks at the way in which the phenomenon of globalization has impacted on Korean society in terms of national identity, corporate change, labour markets, democracy, tradition and social policy, and the implications for Korea's social cohesion in a continually globalizing world. While becoming more open to the outside world, South Korea has remained a cohesive national community with a strong nationalist reaction against the globalization of Korea and with Koreans constantly reminding themselves of the need to retain their national identity.They have also learned to cope with various forms of conflict arising from diversified interests in a complex society and the South Korean government is now making a serious attempt to establish a welfare state with various schemes designed to help the poor and needy to maintain a minimum level of 'decent' living. But it is uncertain whether South Korean society will continue to remain cohesive. Social inequality is increasing and the class divisions appear to be hardening and as such can Korea remain cohesive? As a volume looking at the political and social implications of globalization in modern South Korea, this book will be of great interest to students and scholars of Korean and East Asian studies, comparative sociology, development studies and politics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415458795 20160527
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xii, 314 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-195-01, HISTORY-395-01, HISTORY-95-01, INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
ix, 304 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Northeast Asia's economic and security regionalism : withering or blossoming? / Vinod K. Aggarwal and Min Gyo Koo
  • China's impact on regional relations in Northeast Asia : an assessment / David C. Kang
  • Constructing multilateralism in an anti-region : from Six Party Talks to a regional security framework in Northeast Asia? / Paul Evans
  • China's regional activism in East Asia / Zhu Feng
  • Regionalism : the view from Northeast Asia / Makio Miyagawa
  • Community-building in Northeast Asia : a Korean perspective / Su-Hoon Lee
  • The poisoned well : fifty years of Sino-Japanese animosity / Mark R. Peattie
  • The need for a composite strategy in China-Japan relations / Yinhong Shi
  • The Japan-China relationship in the East Asia region / Tomoyuki Kojima
  • The China-Japan rivalry : Korea's pivotal position? / Scott Snyder
  • The United States and Northeast Asia : the Cold War legacy / Daniel C. Sneider
  • Asia and our challenges : a U.S. perspective / Randall Schriver
  • The U.S. response to Asian regionalism / Michael H. Armacost.
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xxii, 309 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction : famine, aid, and markets in North Korea
  • The origins of the great famine
  • The distribution of misery : famine and the breakdown of the public distribution system
  • The aid regime : the problem of monitoring
  • Diversion
  • The political economy of aid
  • Coping, marketization, and reform : new sources of vulnerability
  • Conclusion : North Korea in comparative and international perspective
  • Appendix 1. Illicit activities
  • Appendix 2. The scope of the humanitarian aid effort
  • Appendix 3. The marketization balance sheet.
In the mid-1990S, as many as one million North Koreans died in one of the worst famines of the twentieth century. The collapse of the socialist food distribution system was primarily the result of a misguided push for self-reliance, but compounding the crisis was the regime's failure to formulate a quick response - the regime even blocked desperately needed humanitarian relief. As households, enterprises, local party organs, and military units tried to cope with the economic collapse, a grassroots process of marketization took root. However, rather than embrace these changes, the North Korean regime opted for tentative economic reforms with ambiguous benefits and a self-destructive foreign policy. As a result, a chronic food shortage continues to plague North Korea today. To fully understand North Korea's famine is a vital project of historical recovery, one that is especially critical in light of our current engagement with the "North Korean question." In their carefully researched book, Stephan Haggard and Marcus Noland present the most comprehensive account of the famine to date, examining not only the origins and aftermath of the crisis but also the regime's response to outside aid and the effect of its current policies on the country's economic future. The famine exemplified the depredations that can arise from tyrannical rule and the dilemmas such regimes pose for the humanitarian community, as well as the obstacles inherent in achieving economic and political reform.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231511520 20160527
In the mid-1990s, as many as one million North Koreans died in one of the worst famines of the twentieth century. The socialist food distribution system collapsed primarily because of a misguided push for self-reliance, but was compounded by the regime's failure to formulate a quick response-including the blocking of desperately needed humanitarian relief. As households, enterprises, local party organs, and military units tried to cope with the economic collapse, a grassroots process of marketization took root. However, rather than embracing these changes, the North Korean regime opted for tentative economic reforms with ambiguous benefits and a self-destructive foreign policy. As a result, a chronic food shortage continues to plague North Korea today. In their carefully researched book, Stephan Haggard and Marcus Noland present the most comprehensive and penetrating account of the famine to date, examining not only the origins and aftermath of the crisis but also the regime's response to outside aid and the effect of its current policies on the country's economic future. Their study begins by considering the root causes of the famine, weighing the effects of the decline in the availability of food against its poor distribution. Then it takes a close look at the aid effort, addressing the difficulty of monitoring assistance within the country, and concludes with an analysis of current economic reforms and strategies of engagement.North Korea's famine exemplified the depredations that can arise from tyrannical rule and the dilemmas such regimes pose for the humanitarian community, as well as the obstacles inherent in achieving economic and political reform. To reveal the state's culpability in this tragic event is a vital project of historical recovery, one that is especially critical in light of our current engagement with the "North Korean question.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231140003 20160528
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xii, 349 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction : minjung, history, and historical subjectivity
  • The construction of minjung
  • Anticommunism and North Korea
  • Anti-Americanism and chuch'e sasang
  • The undonggwŏn as a counterpublic sphere
  • Between indeterminacy and radical critique : madanggŭk, ritual, and protest
  • The alliance between labor and intellectuals
  • "To be reborn as revolutionary workers" : Gramscian fusion and Leninist vanguardism
  • The subject as the subjected : intellectuals and workers in labor literature
  • Conclusion : the minjung movement as history.
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
xv, 286 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01
Book
307 p.
  • Introduction: explaining the roots and politics of Korean nationalism
  • Pan-Asianism and nationalism
  • Colonial racism and nationalism
  • International socialism and nationalism
  • North korea and "socialism of our style"
  • Ilmin chuui and "modernization of the fatherland"
  • Contentious politics
  • Universalism and particularism in nation building
  • Tradition, modernity, and nation
  • Division and politics of national representation
  • Nation, history, and politics
  • Ethnic identity and national unification
  • Between nationalism and globalization
  • Conclusion: genealogy, legacy, and future.
This book explains the roots, politics, and legacy of Korean ethnic nationalism, which is based on the sense of a shared bloodline and ancestry. Belief in a racially distinct and ethnically homogeneous nation is widely shared on both sides of the Korean peninsula, although some scholars believe it is a myth with little historical basis. Finding both positions problematic and treating identity formation as a social and historical construct that has crucial behavioral consequences, this book examines how such a blood-based notion has become a dominant source of Korean identity, overriding other forms of identity in the modern era. It also looks at how the politics of national identity have played out in various contexts in Korea: semicolonialism, civil war, authoritarian politics, democratization, territorial division, and globalization.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804754088 20160528
Green Library
INTNLREL-143-01, SOC-111-01, SOC-211-01