Search results

RSS feed for this result

2 results

Book
ix, 290 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -- INTRODUCTION -- 1. : The New Sanctuary Movement -- 2. : Changing Hearts and Minds -- 3. : Sanctuary as Religious Conversion -- 4. : Focusing on Families -- 5. : The Art of Balance -- 6. : An Immigrant Rights Organization Without Immigrants? -- 7. : Who Rules in the Kingdom of God? -- CONCLUSION -- APPENDIX A: STORYTELLING AND TERMINOLOGY -- APPENDIX B: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY -- NOTES -- REFERENCES -- INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199988679 20160612
Behind the walls of a church, Liliana and her baby eat, sleep, and wait. Outside, protestors shout "Go back to Mexico!" and "Tax this political church!" They demand that the U.S. government deport Liliana, which would separate her from her husband and children. Is Liliana a criminal or a hero? And why does the church protect her? Grace Yukich draws on extensive field observation and interviews to reveal how immigration is changing religious activism in the U.S. In the face of nationwide immigration raids and public hostility toward "illegal" immigration, the New Sanctuary Movement emerged in 2007 as a religious force seeking to humanize the image of undocumented immigrants like Liliana. Building coalitions between religious and ethnic groups that had rarely worked together in the past, activists revived and adapted "sanctuary, " the tradition of providing shelter for fugitives in houses of worship. Through sanctuary, they called on Americans to support legislation that would keep immigrant families together. But they sought more than political change: they also pursued religious transformation, challenging the religious nationalism in America's faith communities by portraying undocumented immigrants as fellow children of God. Yukich shows progressive religious activists struggling with the competing goals of newly diverse coalitions, fighting to expand the meaning of "family values" in a globalizing nation. Through these struggles, the activists both challenged the public dominance of the religious right and created conflicts that could doom their chances of impacting immigration reform.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199988679 20160612
Green Library
AMSTUD-117R-01, RELIGST-117-01
Book
673 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
American Grace is a major achievement, a groundbreaking examination of religion in America. Unique among nations, America is deeply religious, religiously diverse, and remarkably tolerant. But in recent decades the nation's religious landscape has been reshaped. America has experienced three seismic shocks, say Robert Putnam and David Campbell. In the 1960s, religious observance plummeted. Then in the 1970s and 1980s, a conservative reaction produced the rise of evangelicalism and the Religious Right. Since the 1990s, however, young people, turned off by that linkage between faith and conservative politics, have abandoned organised religion. The result has been a growing polarisation - the ranks of religious conservatives and secular liberals have swelled, leaving a dwindling group of religious moderates in between. At the same time, personal interfaith ties are strengthening. Interfaith marriage has increased while religious identities have become more fluid. Putnam and Campbell show how this denser web of personal ties brings surprising interfaith tolerance, notwithstanding the so-called culture wars. American Grace promises to be the most important book in decades about American religious life.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781416566717 20160604
Green Library
AMSTUD-117R-01, RELIGST-117-01