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Book
xii, 215 pages ; 25 cm
Silicon Valley's latest trend for creating new ventures is based on trial and error: test market needs with new product concepts and a minimum amount of capital, expect that the product may not meet the market need, so fail fast and try another product with the hope that a product-market fit will eventually emerge. But this fail fast, step-and-pivot philosophy is like taking a random walk in the forest without a compass. If You Really Want to Change the World is about helping entrepreneurs find true north. Henry Kressel and Norman Winarsky--technologists, inventors, and investors with stellar track records--provide a guide for those who wish to create a market-leading company that will have a real impact: a disciplined and staged approach they have used to launch, invest in, and develop scores of highly successful companies. If You Really Want to Change the World leads entrepreneurs through the critical stages of venture development, from concept to acquisition or public offering to maintaining a rich culture of innovation in the company. It is a guide by innovators for innovators, with approaches that are practical and timeless. Drawing on the authors' experiences as well as those of their partners from around the world, Kressel and Winarsky share the stories of their triumphs and misses, demonstrate their method in action, and inspire their readers in the process. There are more opportunities now than ever before to build breakthrough companies that touch millions of lives. If this is your goal, let this book be your guide to creating world-changing ventures.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781625278296 20160619
Business Library
OB-512-01, OB-512-01
Book
210 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • The challenge of the future
  • Party like it's 1999
  • All happy companies are different
  • The ideology of competition
  • Last mover advantage
  • You are not a lottery ticket
  • Follow the money
  • Secrets
  • Foundations
  • The mechanics of mafia
  • If you build it, will they come?
  • Man and machine
  • Seeing green
  • The founder's paradox
  • Conclusion: stagnation or singularity.
"EVERY MOMENT IN BUSINESS HAPPENS ONLY ONCE. The next Bill Gates will not build an operating system. The next Larry Page or Sergey Brin won't make a search engine. And the next Mark Zuckerberg won't create a social network. If you are copying these guys, you aren't learning from them. It's easier to copy a model than to make something new: doing what we already know how to do takes the world from 1 to n, adding more of something familiar. But every time we create something new, we go from 0 to 1. The act of creation is singular, as is the moment of creation, and the result is something fresh and strange. Zero to One is about how to build companies that create new things. It draws on everything I've learned directly as a co-founder of PayPal and Palantir and then an investor in hundreds of startups, including Facebook and SpaceX. The single most powerful pattern I have noticed is that successful people find value in unexpected places, and they do this by thinking about business from first principles instead of formulas. Ask not, what would Mark do? Ask: WHAT VALUABLE COMPANY IS NOBODY BUILDING? "-- Provided by publisher.
"Thiel starts from the bold premise that we live in an age of technological stagnation, even if we're too distracted by our new mobile devices to notice. Progress has stalled in every industry except computers, and globalization is hardly the revolution people think it is. It's true that the world can get marginally richer by building new copies of old inventions, making horizontal progress from "1 to n." But true innovators have nothing to copy. The most valuable companies of the future will make vertical progress from "0 to 1," creating entirely new industries and products that have never existed before. Zero to One is about how to build these companies. Tomorrow's champions will not win by competing ruthlessly in today's marketplace. They will escape competition altogether, because their businesses will be unique. In today's post-internet bubble world, conventional wisdom dictates that all the good ideas are taken, and the economy becomes a tournament in which everyone competes to reach the top. Zero to One shows how to quit the zero-sum tournament by finding an untapped market, creating a new product, and quickly scaling up a monopoly business that captures lasting value. Planning an escape from competition is essential for every business and every individual, not just for technology startups. The greatest secret of the modern era is that there are still unique frontiers to explore and new problems to solve. Zero to One shows how to pursue them using the most important, most difficult, and most underrated skill in every job or industry: thinking for yourself"-- Provided by publisher.
Business Library
OB-512-01, OB-512-01
Book
1 online resource.
  • The challenge of the future
  • Party like it's 1999
  • All happy companies are different
  • The ideology of competition
  • Last mover advantage
  • You are not a lottery ticket
  • Follow the money
  • Secrets
  • Foundations
  • The mechanics of mafia
  • If you build it, will they come?
  • Man and machine
  • Seeing green
  • The founder's paradox
  • Conclusion: stagnation or singularity.
WHAT VALUABLE COMPANY IS NOBODY BUILDING? The next Bill Gates will not build an operating system. The next Larry Page or Sergey Brin won't make a search engine. If you are copying these guys, you aren't learning from them. It's easier to copy a model than to make something new: doing what we already know how to do takes the world from 1 to n, adding more of something familiar. Every new creation goes from 0 to 1. This book is about how to get there. `Peter Thiel has built multiple breakthrough companies, and Zero to One shows how.' ELON MUSK, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla `This book delivers completely new and refreshing ideas on how to create value in the world.' MARK ZUCKERBERG, CEO of Facebook `When a risk taker writes a book, read it. In the case of Peter Thiel, read it twice. Or, to be safe, three times. This is a classic.' NASSIM NICHOLAS TALEB, author of The Black Swan.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780753550304 20170911
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Business Library
OB-512-01