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Book
242 pages ; 21 cm
  • Venice, book capital of the world
  • Aldus Manutius, the Michelangelo of books
  • The first Talmud
  • The lost Koran
  • Armenians and Greeks
  • The wind from the East
  • Geography and war
  • Music publishing
  • Cures for the body: medicine, cosmetology, and gastronomy
  • Pietro Aretino and birth of the author
  • Decline, come back, and swan song.
Green Library
MLA-298-01
Book
198 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Must children born with socially challenging anatomies have their bodies changed because others cannot be expected to change their minds? One of Us views conjoined twinning and other "abnormalities" from the point of view of people living with such anatomies, and considers these issues within the larger historical context of anatomical politics. Anatomy matters, Alice Domurat Dreger tells us, because the senses we possess, the muscles we control, and the resources we require to keep our bodies alive limit and guide what we experience in any given context. Her deeply thought-provoking and compassionate work exposes the breadth and depth of that context - the extent of the social frame upon which we construct the "normal." In doing so, the book calls into question assumptions about anatomy and normality, and transforms our understanding of how we are all intricately and inextricably joined.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674012943 20160527
Green Library
MLA-298-01, THINK-48-01, THINK-48-01
Book
xxi, 386 p., [14] p. of plates : ill., 1 map ; 24 cm.
Perhaps more than in any other city, Venice has been shaped by its environment. The lagoon on which it was built isolated the city's inhabitants from mainland Europe, forcing them to look seaward for their survival and to establish a maritime empire that generated incalculable wealth, making Venice the envy of Renaissance Europe. In this volume, Elisabeth Crouzet-Pavan provides a multilayered history of Venice from Roman times to the 16th century. Instead of employing a rigidly chronological framework, she looks at the history of Venice thematically, focusing on the relationship between the city and its unique physical milieu in a way that emphasizes complexity and continuity. Central to Crouzet-Pavan's discussion is her concept of "l'imaginaire", literally translated as "the imaginary" and here meaning the many symbolic terms Venetians created to describe and understand the peculiar space they inhabited and, by extension, themselves. One key example of "l'imaginaire" is Venetians' use of the term "the continent" to refer, somewhat dismissively, to Italy, Germany, and other lands beyond the lagoon in order to emphasize their own distinctive maritime identity. As Crouzet-Pavan shows, this sense of exceptionalism impacts every aspect of Venetian history: its art and architecture; its involvement with mainland politics; its commercial, civic, and political institutions; and the shape of daily life in its homes, alleys, and courtyards.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801869587 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-332B-01, ITALIAN-332B-01, MLA-298-01
Book
xxiv, 484 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
MLA-298-01
Book
xxvii, 115 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
These works by Sister Bartolomea Riccoboni offer an intimate portrait of the women who inhabited the venetian convent of Corpus Domini, where they shared a religious life bounded physically by the convent walls and organized temporally by the rhythms of work and worship. At the same time, they show how this cloistered community vibrated with news of the great ecclesiastical events of the day, such as the Great Western Schism and the Council of Constance. While the chronicle recounts the history of the nuns' collective life, the necrology provides highly individualized biographies of nearly 50 women who died in the convent between 1395 and 1436. We follow the fascinating stories that led these women, from adolescent girls to elderly widows, to join the convent; and we learn of their cultural backgrounds and intellectual accomplishments, their ascetic practices and mystical visions, their charity and devotion to each other, and their fortitude in the face of illness and death. FDEThe personal and social meaning of religious devotion comes alive in these texts, the first of their kind to be translated into English.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226717890 20160528
Green Library
MLA-298-01
Book
xiii, 538 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
The essays in this volume offer a portrait of Venice from the establishment of the Republic at the end of the 13th century to its fall to Napoleon in 1797. In contrast to efforts which have characterized Venice's politics as strictly republican, the volume presents a more fluid and complex interpretation of Venetian culture. Drawing on a variety of disciplines - history, art history and musicology - these essays show that fundamental social categories such as nobility and citizenship were continually modifed and renegotiated throughout the Republic's history. In particular, the study of women and nonelites complicates the more static images of Venice that once dominated the historiography. New analyses of Venice's rule of the terraferma have profoundly altered perceptions of the Republic's politcal history and its legacies to the emerging nation-state. Finally, through explorations of the meanings and functions of art, music and architectue, these essays present variants of the myth of Venice - the nearly inexhaustible repertoire of stories Venetians told about themselves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801863127 20160527
Green Library
MLA-298-01
Book
xxvii, 290 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Gender equality and the responsibilty of husbands and fathers had currency in Renaissance Venice as evidenced by the publication of this title in 1600. Moderata Fonte was the pseudonym of Modesta Pozzo (1555-92), a Venetian woman who produced literature in genres that were commonly considered "masculine" - the chivalric romance and the literary dialogue. This work takes the form of the latter, with Fonte creating a converation among seven Venetain noblewomen. The dialogue explores nearly every aspect of women's experience in both theoretical and practical terms. These women, who differ in age and experience, take as their broad theme men's curious hostility towards women and the possible cures for it. Fonte seeks to elevate women's status to that of men, arguing that women have the same innate abilities as men and, when singularly educated, prove their equals.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226256825 20160528
Green Library
MLA-298-01
Book
119 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
MLA-298-01
Book
xxv, 308 p. : ill., map, fascims. ; 24 cm.
Leon (Judah Aryeh) Modena was a major intellectual figure of the early modern Italian Jewish community--a complex and intriguing personality who was famous among contemporary European Christians as well as Jews. Modena produced an autobiography that documents in poignant detail the turbulent life of his family in the Jewish ghetto of Venice. The text of this work is well known to Jewish scholars but has never before been translated from the original Hebrew, except in brief excerpts. This complete translation, based on Modena's autographic manuscript, makes available in English a wealth of historical material about Jewish family life of the period, religion in daily life, the plague of 1630-1631, crime and punishment, the influence of kabbalistic mysticisms, and a host of other subjects. The introdctory essay by Mark R. Cohen and Theodore K. Rabb highlights the significance of the work for early modern Jewish and general European history. Howard E. Adelman presents an up-to-date biographical sketch of the author and points the way toward a new assessment of his place in Jewish history.Natalie Zemon Davis places Modena's work in the context of European autobiography, both Christian and Jewish, and especially explores the implications of the Jewish status as outsider for the privileged exploration of the self. A set of historical notes, compiled by Howard Adelman and Benjamin C.I. Ravid, elucidates the text.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691008240 20160528
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
MLA-298-01
Book
xiv, 356 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
MLA-298-01
Book
192 p., [8] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Green Library
MLA-298-01
Book
xiii, 505 p. illus. 27 cm.
"Frederic Lane has achieved what is the often unfulfilled dream of every historian who has devoted his entire work to the exploration of partial aspects of a single broad subject: he has given us a comprehensive, thoughtful, readable, beautifully illustrated general history of Venice from the origins to the beginning of decline."--'Speculum.'.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801814600 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
MLA-298-01
Book
379 p. : maps, geneal. table ; 18 cm.
Green Library
MLA-298-01